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Definitions of lobby

  1. a large entrance or reception room or area Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. detain in conversation by or as if by holding on to the outer garments of; as for political or economic favors Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a group of people who try actively to influence legislation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. That part of a hall of legislation not appropriated to the official use of the assembly; hence, the persons, collectively, who frequent such a place to transact business with the legislators; any persons, not members of a legislative body, who strive to influence its proceedings by personal agency. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. An apartment or passageway in the fore part of an old-fashioned cabin under the quarter-deck. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A confined place for cattle, formed by hedges. trees, or other fencing, near the farmyard. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To address or solicit members of a legislative body in the lobby or elsewhere, with the purpose to influence their votes. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To urge the adoption or passage of by soliciting members of a legislative body; as, to lobby a bill. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A small hall or waiting room; passage opening into an apartment; legislative hall, etc.; persons who try to influence the votes of members of a law-making body. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To try to get the votes of members of a legislature or law-making body. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. Lobbied. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Lobbying. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. A small hall or waiting-room: a passage serving as a common entrance to several apartments. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. A waiting-room; passage. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To try to secure (legislation) by corrupt influence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. An anteroom, as of a legislative hall; men engaged in lobbying. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Lobbyist. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A passage opening into several apartments; a hall serving as an ante-room; a small hall or waiting-room; an apartment close before the captain's cabin; a confined place for cattle, near the farm-yard. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. An antechamber or gallery; a hall or passage serving as a common entrance to different apartments. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. A passage or hall of communication, especially when large enough to serve also as a waiting room. It differs from an antechamber in that a lobby communicates between several rooms, an antechamber to one only; but this distinction is not carefully preserved. mso.anu.edu.au
  21. That part of a hall of legislation not appropriated to the official use of the assembly; hence, the persons, collectively, who frequent such a place to transact business with the legislators; dictgcide_fs
  22. To address or solicit members of a legislative body in the lobby or elsewhere, with the purpose to influence their votes; in an extended sense, to try to influence decision-makers in any circumstance. dictgcide_fs
  23. To urge the adoption or passage of by soliciting members of a legislative body; as, to lobby a bill; also used with the legislators as object; as, to lobby the state legislatuire for protection. dictgcide_fs
  24. lob'i, n. a small hall or waiting-room: a passage serving as a common entrance to several apartments: the ante-chamber of a legislative hall, frequented by outsiders for the purpose of influencing votes.--ns. LOBB'YING, frequenting the lobby to collect political intelligence, &c.; LOBB'YIST, LOBB'Y-MEM'BER, a journalist, &c., who frequents a lobby in the interest of some cause or of a newspaper. [Low L. lobia--Middle High Ger. loube (Ger. laube), a portico, arbour--laub, a leaf.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  25. Porch, anteroom, entrance-hall, corridor; (in House of Commons &c.) large hall open to public used esp. for interviews between members& outsiders, (also division l.) one of two corridors to which members retire to vote. (Vb, chiefly United States) influence (members of legislature), get (bill &c.) through, by l. interviews &c.; frequent l. of legislature, solicit members votes, whence lobbyist (1) n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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