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Definitions of long

  1. planning prudently for the future; "large goals that required farsighted policies"; "took a long view of the geopolitical issues" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. desire strongly or persistently Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a comparatively long time; "this won't take long"; "they haven't been gone long" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. for an extended time or at a distant time; "a promotion long overdue"; "something long hoped for"; "his name has long been forgotten"; "talked all night long"; "how long will you be gone?"; "arrived long before he was expected"; "it is long after your bedtime" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. for an extended distance Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. having or being more than normal or necessary:"long on brains"; "in long supply" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. primarily spatial sense; of relatively great or greater than average spatial extension or extension as specified; "a long road"; "a long distance"; "contained many long words"; "ten miles long" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. primarily temporal sense; being or indicating a relatively great or greater than average duration or passage of time or a duration as specified; ; "a long life"; "a long boring speech"; "a long time"; "a long friendship"; "a long game"; "long ago"; "an hour long" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. (phonetics) of speech sounds (especially vowels) of relatively long duration (as e.g. the English vowel sounds in `bate', `beat', `bite', `boat', `boot') Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (finance) holding securities or commodities in expectation of a rise in prices; "is long on coffee"; "a long position in gold" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. involving substantial risk; "long odds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. of relatively great height; "a race of long gaunt men"- Sherwood Anderson; "looked out the long French windows" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. (of memory) having greater than average range; "a long memory especially for insults"; "a tenacious memory" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. of speech sounds (especially vowels) of relatively long duration (as e.g. the English vowel sounds in `bate', `beat', `bite', `boat', `boot') Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. holding securities or commodities in expectation of a rise in prices; "is long on coffee"; "a long position in gold" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. used of syllables that are unaccented or of relatively long duration Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. Drawn out or extended in time; continued through a considerable tine, or to a great length; as, a long series of events; a long debate; a long drama; a long history; a long book. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Slow in passing; causing weariness by length or duration; lingering; as, long hours of watching. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Occurring or coming after an extended interval; distant in time; far away. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Extended to any specified measure; of a specified length; as, a span long; a yard long; a mile long, that is, extended to the measure of a mile, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Far-reaching; extensive. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A note formerly used in music, one half the length of a large, twice that of a breve. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A long sound, syllable, or vowel. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To a great extent in time; during a long time. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. At a point of duration far distant, either prior or posterior; as, not long before; not long after; long before the foundation of Rome; long after the Conquest. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Through the whole extent or duration. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. By means of; by the fault of; because of. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Having a supply of stocks or goods; prepared for, or depending for a profit upon, advance in prices; as, long of cotton. Hence, the phrases: to be, or go, long of the market, to be on the long side of the market, to hold products or securities for a rise in price, esp. when bought on a margin. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Drawn out in a line, or in the direction of length; protracted; extended; as, a long line; - opposed to short, and distinguished from broad or wide. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Prolonged, or relatively more prolonged, in utterance; - said of vowels and syllables. See Short, a., 13, and Guide to Pronunciation, 22, 30. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The longest dimension; the greatest extent; - in the phrase, the long and the short of it, that is, the sum and substance of it. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Through an extent of time, more or less; - only in question; as, how long will you be gone? Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To feel a strong or morbid desire or craving; to wish for something with eagerness; - followed by an infinitive, or by after or for. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To belong; - used with to, unto, or for. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Not short; covering a great distance from end to end; extended in time; having a definite measure in space or time; as, a yard long; drawn out or continued to a great extent; slow; tedious. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. To a great length or period; at a time for distant; for a length of time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To desire something eagerly; with for or after. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. (comp. LONGER; superl. LONGEST) Extended: not short: extended in time: slow in coming: tedious: farreaching. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. To a great extent in space or time: through the whole: all along. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. To desire earnestly: to have an eager appetite. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. LONGINGLY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Extended; protracted; tedious. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. Through much space or time. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To desire earnestly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To have an eager craving or desire. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. Having length; lasting; extended, as in space or time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. To, at, or through a great extent or period. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Extended in length; extended in time; protracted; slow in coming; lingering; extending far in prospect; far-seeing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. To a great extent in space or time; at a point of duration far distant. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To desire earnestly; to have a craving appetite. Long-home, the grave, or death. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. To a great extent in apace; as, a long drawn out line. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. Not short; drawn out in length or time; continued, as in time or sound; extending far in space or prospect. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. To a great length or extent; not for a short time; throughout, as all his life long. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. To desire or wish for earnestly; to wish for eagerly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. In various compound legal terms (see infra) this word carries a meaning not essentially different from its signification in the vernacular. In the language of the stock exchange, a broker or speculator is said to be "long" on stock, or as to a particular security, when he has in his possession or control an abun- dant supply of it, or a supply exceeding the amount which he has contracted to deliver, or. more particularly, when he has bought a supply of such stock or other security for future delivery, speculating on a considerable future advance in the market price. See Kent v. Miltenberger, 13 Mo. App. 506. thelawdictionary.org
  56. Drawn out in a line, or in the direction of length; protracted; extended; as, a long line; -- opposed to short, and distinguished from broad or wide. mso.anu.edu.au
  57. Prolonged, or relatively more prolonged, in utterance; -- said of vowels and syllables. See Short, a., 13, and Guide to Pronunciation, // 22, 30. mso.anu.edu.au
  58. The longest dimension; the greatest extent; -- in the phrase, the long and the short of it, that is, the sum and substance of it. mso.anu.edu.au
  59. Through an extent of time, more or less; -- only in question; as, how long will you be gone? mso.anu.edu.au
  60. To feel a strong or morbid desire or craving; to wish for something with eagerness; -- followed by an infinitive, or by after or for. mso.anu.edu.au
  61. To belong; -- used with to, unto, or for. mso.anu.edu.au
  62. Drawn out in a line, or in the direction of length; protracted; extended; as, a long line; opposed to short, and distinguished from broad or wide. dictgcide_fs
  63. Having a length of the specified measure; of a specified length; as, a span long; a yard long; a mile long, that is, extended to the measure of a mile, etc. dictgcide_fs
  64. Prolonged, or relatively more prolonged, in utterance; said of vowels and syllables. See Short, a., 13, and Guide to Pronunciation, dictgcide_fs
  65. Having a supply of stocks or goods; prepared for, or depending for a profit upon, advance in prices; as, long of cotton. Hence, the phrases: to be, or go, long of the market, to be on the long side of the market, to hold products or securities for a rise in price, esp. when bought on a margin. Contrasted to short. dictgcide_fs
  66. The longest dimension; the greatest extent; in the phrase, the long and the short of it, that is, the sum and substance of it. dictgcide_fs
  67. To a great extent in space; as, a long drawn out line. dictgcide_fs
  68. Through an extent of time, more or less; only in question; as, how long will you be gone? dictgcide_fs
  69. To feel a strong or morbid desire or craving; to wish for something with eagerness; followed by an infinitive, or by for or after. dictgcide_fs
  70. To belong; used with to, unto, or for. dictgcide_fs
  71. long, conj. by means (of), owing (to). [Along.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  72. long, v.i. (Spens.) to belong. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  73. long, adj. (comp. LONG'ER; superl. LONG'EST) extended: not short: extended in time: slow in coming: tedious: far-reaching.--n. (prosody) a long time or syllable: (coll.) the long summer vacation at the English universities, termed 'the Long.'--adv. to a great extent in space or time: through the whole: all along.--v.i. to desire earnestly.--adv. LONG'-AG[=O]', in the far past.--n. the far past.--n. LONGANIM'ITY, long-suffering, endurance.--adj. LONGAN'IMOUS.--ns. LONG'BOAT, the largest and strongest boat of a ship; LONG'-BOW, a bow bent by the hand in shooting, called long as distinguished from the cross-bow.--adj. LONG'-BREATHED, able to continue violent exercise of the lungs for a long time.--n.pl. LONG'-COATS, long clothes, worn by infants.--adj. LONG'-DESCEND'ED, of ancient lineage.--n. LONG'-DOZ'EN, thirteen.--adjs. LONG'-DRAWN, prolonged; LONGEVAL, LONGEVOUS (-j[=e]'-), of long or great age.--ns. LONGEVITY (-jev'-); LONG'-FIELD (cricket), a fielder placed near the boundary on the bowler's side; LONG'-FIRM, the name given to a company of swindlers who obtain goods on pretence of being established in business, and then decamp without payment to do the like elsewhere; LONG'HAND, writing of the ordinary kind.--adj. LONG'-HEAD'ED, having good intellectual powers: sagacious.--ns. LONG'-HEAD'EDNESS; LONG'-HUN'DRED, a hundred and twenty.--adjs. LON'GICORN (-ji-), having long antennæ; LONGIMANOUS (-jim'-), long-handed; LONGIMET'RIC.--ns. LONGIMETRY (-jim'-), the art of measuring distances; LONG'ING, an eager desire, craving, esp. of the whimsical desires sometimes felt in pregnancy.--adv. LONG'INGLY.--n. LONGINQUITY (-jinq'-), greatness of distance.--adj. LONGIPEN'NATE (-ji-), long-winged, as gulls.--n. LONGIROS'TER (-ji-), one of a family of birds having a long, slender bill, as the snipe.--adjs. LONGIROS'TRAL, LONGIROS'TRATE (-ji-), having a long bill or beak; LONG'ISH.--n. LON'GITUDE (-ji-), distance of a place east or west of a given meridian: distance in degrees from the vernal equinox, on the ecliptic--adj. LONGITUD'INAL, pertaining to longitude or length: extending lengthwise.--adv. LONGITUD'INALLY.--n. LONG'-LEG (cricket), see LEG.--adj. LONG'-LEGGED, having long legs.--n. LONG'LEGS, an insect with long legs, as the common crane-fly.--adj. LONG'-LIVED, having a long life.--adv. LONG'LY (Shak.), longingly.--ns. LONG'-MEAS'URE, lineal measure; LONG'-OFF, LONG'-ON (cricket), the fielders in the long-field to the left and right of the bowler respectively; LONG'-PRIM'ER, a size of type intermediate between small pica and bourgeois; LONG'-PUR'PLES, the manorchis.--adj. LONG'-RANGE, able to reach or hit from a considerable distance.--n.pl. LONGS'-AND-SHORTS', verses.--adj. LONG'SHORE, existing or employed along the shore.--n. LONG'SHOREMAN, a stevedore: one who makes a living along shores by oyster-fishing, &c.--adj. LONG'-SIGHT'ED, able to see far but not close at hand: sagacious.--ns. LONG'-SIGHT'EDNESS; LONG'-SLIP (cricket), a fielder some distance behind on the right of the batsman.--adjs. LONG'SOME, long and tedious; LONG'-SPUN, long-drawn, tedious; LONG'-ST[=A]'PLE, having a long fibre.--n. LONG'-STOP (cricket), one who stands behind the wicket-keeper and stops balls missed by him.--v.i. to field at long-stop.--adj. LONG'-SUFF'ERING, enduring long.--n. long endurance or patience.--n. LONG'-TAIL, an animal, esp. a dog, with uncut tail--also adj.--adjs. LONG'-TONGUED, talkative, babbling; LONG'-VIS'AGED, having a long face, of rueful countenance; LONG'-WAIST'ED, having a long waist, long from the armpits to the hips; LONG'-WIND'ED, long-breathed: tedious.--n. LONG'-WIND'EDNESS.--adv. LONG'WISE, lengthwise.--LONG HOME, the grave; LONG TOM (see TOM).--A LONG FIGURE (slang), a high price or rate; BEFORE LONG, ERE LONG, soon; DRAW THE LONG-BOW, to exaggerate, to tell incredible stories; FOR LONG, for a considerable period of time; IN THE LONG-RUN (see RUN); MAKE A LONG ARM (prov.), to help one's self liberally at table; THE LONG AND THE SHORT, the sum of the matter in a few words. [A.S. lang; Ger. lang, Ice. langr.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  74. Longus, Macros. That which is much greater in length than in breadth; as the long bones. The epithet is, also, applied to several muscles, to distinguish them from others of similar function, when the latter are shorter. We say, for instance, long flexors, and long extensors, in opposition to short flexors, and short extensors. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  75. Measuring much from end to end in space or time (l. line, distance, journey; l. life, whence longlived a; make a l. arm, reach out for something esp. at table; has a l. arm, can make his power felt far; l. face, dismal; l. head, of more than average length, fig. shrewdness or foresight, whence longheaded a., longheadedness n., lit. & fig.; make a l. nose, cock snook; l. tongue, loquacity; two &c. l. miles &c., more than that; by a l. chalk; grievance &c. of l. standing, not recent); (prefixed to name; colloq.) tall (L. Tom, gun of great length or range); far-reaching, acting at a distance, involving great interval or difference, (l. sight, that sees distant objects, fig. penetretion, whence long-sighted a., long-sightedness n., lit. & fig.; little pitchers have l. ears; take l. views, consider remote effects; l. odds in betting, very uneven; l. bowls, fighting at l. range, opp. close quarters; l. date, distant date for maturing of bill &c., whence long-dated a.; l. waist in dress, made far down); (usu. appended to measurement) having specified length or duration (tail 6 in. l.; vacation is two months l.; as BROAD as it is l.); of elongated shape; remarkable for or distinguished by or concerned with length or duration (l. clay, churchwarden pipe; l. division; l. ears, stupidity as of ass, whence longeared a.; l. finger, the second; l. jump, measured along ground, opp. high jump; l. measure, miles, yards, inches, &c.; l. metre, hymn-stanza of four eight-syllable lines; Latin Parliament, that elected 1640& dissolved 1660; l. primer; l. robe, legal attire, esp. gentlemen of the l. r., lawyers; in the l. run, in the end after vicissitudes; l. service, system of military enlistment for many e.g. 12 years; l. vacation, summer vacation of law-courts& universities; l. WHIST; l. wind, capacity for running far without rest, or fig. for talking or writing at tedious length, whence long-winded a., long-windedness n.); expressed by many ciphers or consisting of many individuals (l. figure or price, heavy cost; l. family, of many children; l. bill, of many items; l. suit, many cards of one suit in a hand); lengthy, prolix, tedious; of more than the usual numerical amount (l. DOZEN HUNDRED); lasting, going far back or forward, (a l. custom, memory, farewell); (phonet., Pros.; of vowel or syllable) (prop.) having the greater of the two recognized durations, (pop.) stressed, (also, of vowel) having the pronunciation shown in its name (e.g., pate& lucre have long, pat& put or but short a& u); l.-bill, kinds of bird, esp. snipe; l.-boat, sailing-ship\'s largest boat (cf. LAUNCH); l.-bow, drawn by hand& discharging long feathered arrow (cf. CROSS-BOW), draw the l.-b., tell exaggerated or invented stories; l.-butt, cue for reaching billiard-ball beyond range of half-butt; l.-cloth, kind of calico made in l. pieces; l.-clothes, & archaic -coats, clothes of baby in arms; l. field, l. off or on (see below), also part of ground behind bowler; l. firm; longhand, ordinary writing (opp. shorthand); l. hop, short-pitched ball in cricket; l. off, on, man fielding at bowler\'s left, right, rear; l.-pig, sailors\' transl. of cannibals\' name for human flesh; longshanks, stilt or long-legged plover; longstop, man fielding straight behind wicketkeeper, (vb) field here; hence longish (2) a., longways, longwise, advv. (N. orabs. adj.) l. interval or period (shall see you be fore l.; shall not be away for l.; will not take l.; it is l. since I saw him; so at longest, to mention the most distant date possible); recital at length (the l. & the short of it, all that can or need be said, the total upshot); l. syllable (ll. & shorts, verse esp. Latin); (Arch.) ll. & shorts, l. & short blocks placed alternately; =l. vacation. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  76. For a l. time (have l. thought so; nor wants that little l.; so or as l. as transf., provided that, if only; be l. doing, &, prob. by confusion of the adv. w. the adj., in doing, take a l. time, be slow, to do, as he was l. finding it out, the chance was l. in coming; not be l. for this world, have short time to live; l.-liver, one who lives l.); by a l. time (l. before, after, since, ago); (appended to nn. of duration) throughout specified time (all day l., his life l.); (comp., with no, any, much, &c.) after implied point of time (shall not wait any longer; no longer, not benceforth as formerly); l.-ago a. & n., (belonging to) the distant past; l.-drawn (-out), unduly prolonged; l.-standing, that has l. existed; l.-suffering n. & a., bearing provocation patiently. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  77. Yearn, wish vehemently, for thing or to do. Hence longing (1) n., longingly adv. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  78. L. Acre, London street formerly the head-quarters of coach building. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  79. A p. in which the duration of the systolic wave is comparatively long Appleton's medical dictionary.
  80. adv. To a great extent in space;— to a great extent in time at a point of duration far distant, either prior or posterior;— through the whole extent or duration. Cabinet Dictionary

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