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Definitions of lose

  1. fail to make money in a business; make a loss or fail to profit; "I lost thousands of dollars on that bad investment!"; "The company turned a loss after the first year" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. be set at a disadvantage; "This author really suffers in translation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. fail to win; "We lost the battle but we won the war" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. place (something) where one cannot find it again; "I misplaced my eyeglasses" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. suffer the loss of a person through death or removal; "She lost her husband in the war"; "The couple that wanted to adopt the child lost her when the biological parents claimed her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. fail to perceive or to catch with the senses or the mind; "I missed that remark"; "She missed his point"; "We lost part of what he said" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. allow to go out of sight; "The detective lost the man he was shadowing after he had to stop at a red light" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. miss from one's possessions; lose sight of; "I've lost my glasses again!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. fail to keep or to maintain; cease to have, either physically or in an abstract sense; "She lost her purse when she left it unattended on her seat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. fail to get or obtain; "I lost the opportunity to spend a year abroad" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. Lost. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To part with unintentionally or unwillingly, as by accident, misfortune, negligence, penalty, forfeit, etc.; to be deprived of; as, to lose money from one's purse or pocket, or in business or gaming; to lose an arm or a leg by amputation; to lose men in battle. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To cease to have; to possess no longer; to suffer diminution of; as, to lose one's relish for anything; to lose one's health. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Not to employ; to employ ineffectually; to throw away; to waste; to squander; as, to lose a day; to lose the benefits of instruction. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To wander from; to miss, so as not to be able to and; to go astray from; as, to lose one's way. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To ruin; to destroy; as destroy; as, the ship was lost on the ledge. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To be deprived of the view of; to cease to see or know the whereabouts of; as, he lost his companion in the crowd. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To fail to obtain or enjoy; to fail to gain or win; hence, to fail to catch with the mind or senses; to miss; as, I lost a part of what he said. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To cause to part with; to deprive of. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To prevent from gaining or obtaining. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To suffer loss, disadvantage, or defeat; to be worse off, esp. as the result of any kind of contest. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Retreat. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To be deprived of; cease to have in possession; mislay; to wander from; as, to lose one's way; miss; as, to lose an opportunity; fail to win; as, to lose a battle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To fail of success; be defeated. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Losing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. The opposite of keep or gain: to be deprived of: to mislay: to waste, as time: to miss: to bewilder: to cause to perish: to ruin: to suffer waste:-pr.p. losing (loozing); pa.t and pa.p. lost. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. LOSABLE. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. LOSER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To be deprived of; part with; waste; forfeit; miss. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To part with unintentionally; forfeit; mislay; be deprived of; miss; squander; waste. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To cease to have; to be deprived of; not to gain; to fail to obtain; to possess no longer; to forfeit; to waste; to squander; to ruin; to destroy; to cause to perish; to miss; to bewilder; to fail to see or find. To lose one's self, to be bewildered; to have the memory and reason suspended. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To forfeit anything in contest; not to win; to decline; to fail. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To mislay; to lay or drop so as not to be able to find; not to gain or win; to be deprived of; to fail to obtain; to miss; to wander from; to bewilder; to waste, as time; to squander or throw away; to ruin or destroy; not to employ or enjoy; to suffer loss. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. l[=oo]z, v.t. to be deprived of: to cease to have: to mislay: to waste, as time: to miss: to bewilder: to cause to perish: to ruin.--v.i. to fail, to be unsuccessful: to suffer waste:--pr.p. los'ing; pa.t. and pa.p. lost.--adj. LOS'ABLE.--n. LOS'ER.--adj. LOS'ING, causing loss.--adv. LOS'INGLY.--n. LOSS, the act of losing: injury: destruction: defeat: that which is lost: waste.--adj. LOST, parted with: no longer possessed: missing: thrown away: squandered: ruined.--LOSE ONE'S SELF, to lose one's way, to become bewildered; LOST TO, insensible to; LOST TRIBES, the tribes of Israel which never returned from captivity.--AT A LOSS, in uncertainty. [A.S. losian--leósan; cog. with Ger. ver-lieren, to lose.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. (lost pr. law- or lo-). Be deprived of, cease by negligence, misadventure, separation, death, &c., to possess or have, (property, life, quality, limb, father, friend, &c.; doctor loses patient, fails to keep him alive, also is left by him for another doctor; l. patience, one\'s temper, become impatient, angry; l. one\'s head: l. one\'s HEART; l. heart; l. ground, fail to keep position, recede, decline; have lost my cold, got rid of it; l. interest, of person, cease to be interested, of thing, cease to interest), (pass.) disappear, perish, die or be dead, (letter-writing is a lost art; the ship& all hands were lost; lost to sense of duty, shame, &c., no longer affected by them; lost soul, damned); suffer loss or detriment, incur disadvantage, be the worse off in money or otherwise by transaction &c., (the publisher lost by it; the army lost heavily); become unable to find, fail to keep in sight or follow or mentally grasp, (l. a document, one\'s way, the thread of a discourse, a person &c. under observation); spend (time, opportunities, pains) to no purpose, waste, (pass., be lost upon, fail to influence or draw the attention of); fail to obtain, catch, see, or hear (l. one\'s train, a legacy, a word or remark, a fox); forfeit (stake), be defeated in (game, battle, lawsuit, or abs.; losing game, in which defeat seems inevitable; cannot play a losing game, loses heart or temper in it); fail to carry (motion); cause person the loss of, cost, (will l. you your place); (refl. & pass.) go astray, become merged or engrossed (in), be obscured (in); losing hazard. Hence losable a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. story does not l. in the telling, is if anything exaggerated. Concise Oxford Dictionary

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