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Definitions of love

  1. have sexual intercourse with; "This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm"; "Adam knew Eve" (know is archaic); "Were you ever intimate with this man?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a beloved person; used as terms of endearment Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. get pleasure from; "I love cooking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. sexual activities (often including sexual intercourse) between two people; "his lovemaking disgusted her"; "he hadn't had any love in months"; "he has a very complicated love life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a deep feeling of sexual desire and attraction; "their love left them indifferent to their surroundings"; "she was his first love" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a strong positive emotion of regard and affection; "his love for his work"; "children need a lot of love" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a score of zero in tennis or squash; "it was 40 love" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. have a great affection or liking for; "I love French food"; "She loves her boss and works hard for him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. be enamored or in love with; "She loves her husband deeply" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting"; Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. have sexual intercourse with; "This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm"; "Adam knew Eve"; "Were you ever intimate with this man?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. A feeling of strong attachment induced by that which delights or commands admiration; preeminent kindness or devotion to another; affection; tenderness; as, the love of brothers and sisters. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Especially, devoted attachment to, or tender or passionate affection for, one of the opposite sex. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Due gratitude and reverence to God. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Cupid, the god of love; sometimes, Venus. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A thin silk stuff. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A climbing species of Clematis (C. Vitalba). Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To have a feeling of love for; to regard with affection or good will; as, to love one's children and friends; to love one's country; to love one's God. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To regard with passionate and devoted affection, as that of one sex for the other. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To take delight or pleasure in; to have a strong liking or desire for, or interest in; to be pleased with; to like; as, to love books; to love adventures. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To have the feeling of love; to be in love. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Courtship; - chiefly in the phrase to make love, i. e., to court, to woo, to solicit union in marriage. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Affection; kind feeling; friendship; strong liking or desire; fondness; good will; - opposed to hate; often with of and an object. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The object of affection; - often employed in endearing address. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Nothing; no points scored on one side; - used in counting score at tennis, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between members of the opposite sex. Medical Dictionary DB
  27. A strong feeling of affection; fond and tender attachment; passionate devotion to one of the opposite sex; state of feeling kindly toward others and of desiring the welfare of all; as, in love and charity for all men; the term used for zero in scoring at tennis. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To regard with strong affection; feel devotion towards; delight in. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To be in love; have strong affection. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Lovingly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: nothing, in billiards and some other games. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. LOVINGNESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Fondness; affection; the object of affection. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To be fond of; feel affection for. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To regard with affection; delight in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. To feel tender or passionate affection. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Devoted affection; tender feeling; fondness; courtship. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. One who is beloved. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. An affectionate doveted attachment, especially that passionate all-absorbing form of it when the object is one of the opposite sex; courtship; benevolence; the object beloved; a word of endearment; the god of love. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To like; to be pleased with; to regard with affection; to be in love with. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To be in love; to be tenderly attached. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. An affection of the mind excited by qualities in an object which are capable of communicating pleasure; the passion of the sexes; courtship; the object beloved; goodwill; benevolence; strong liking or inclination; fondness; tenderness or regard; poetical personification; dutiful reverence to God. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. To delight or take pleasure in an object; to regard with strong and tender affection, as that of one sex for the other; to regard with parental tenderness; to regard with goodwill or benevolence; to be pleased with; to like. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. Courtship; -- chiefly in the phrase to make love, i. e., to court, to woo, to solicit union in marriage. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. Affection; kind feeling; friendship; strong liking or desire; fondness; good will; -- opposed to hate; often with of and an object. mso.anu.edu.au
  47. The object of affection; -- often employed in endearing address. mso.anu.edu.au
  48. Nothing; no points scored on one side; -- used in counting score at tennis, etc. mso.anu.edu.au
  49. This word seems to require explanation only in the case of its use by our Lord in his interview with "Simon, the son of Jonas," after his resurrection ( John 21:16 John 21:17 ). When our Lord says, "Lovest thou me?" he uses the Greek word agapas ; and when Simon answers, he uses the Greek word philo , i.e., "I love." This is the usage in the first and second questions put by our Lord; but in the third our Lord uses Simon's word. The distinction between these two Greek words is thus fitly described by Trench:, " Agapan has more of judgment and deliberate choice; philein has more of attachment and peculiar personal affection. Thus the 'Lovest thou' (Gr. agapas) on the lips of the Lord seems to Peter at this moment too cold a word, as though his Lord were keeping him at a distance, or at least not inviting him to draw near, as in the passionate yearning of his heart he desired now to do. Therefore he puts by the word and substitutes his own stronger 'I love' (Gr. philo) in its room. A second time he does the same. And now he has conquered; for when the Lord demands a third time whether he loves him, he does it in the word which alone will satisfy Peter ('Lovest thou,' Gr. phileis), which alone claims from him that personal attachment and affection with which indeed he knows that his heart is full." In 1 Corinthians 13 the apostle sets forth the excellency of love, as the word "charity" there is rendered in the Revised Version. biblestudytools.com
  50. A feeling of strong attachment induced by that which delights or commands admiration; preas, the love of brothers and sisters. dictgcide_fs
  51. Courtship; chiefly in the phrase to make love, i. e., to court, to woo, to solicit union in marriage. dictgcide_fs
  52. Affection; kind feeling; friendship; strong liking or desire; fondness; good will; opposed to hate; often with of and an object. dictgcide_fs
  53. The object of affection; often employed in endearing address; as, he held his love in his arms; his greatest love was reading. dictgcide_fs
  54. A climbing species of Clematis (Clematis Vitalba). dictgcide_fs
  55. Nothing; no points scored on one side; used in counting score at tennis, etc. dictgcide_fs
  56. Sexual intercourse; a euphemism. dictgcide_fs
  57. luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.--v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.--v.i. to have the feeling of love.--adj. LOV'ABLE, worthy of love: amiable.--ns. LOVE'-APP'LE, the fruit of the tomato; LOVE'BIRD, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; LOVE'-BROK'ER (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; LOVE'-CHARM, a philtre; LOVE'-CHILD, a bastard; LOVE'-DAY (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; LOVE'-F[=A]'VOUR, something given to be worn in token of love; LOVE'-FEAST, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; LOVE'-FEAT, the gallant act of a lover; LOVE'-IN-[=I]'DLENESS, the heart's-ease; LOVE'-JUICE, a concoction used to excite love; LOVE'-KNOT, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.--adj. LOVE'LESS, without love, tenderness, or kindness.--ns. LOVE'-LETT'ER, a letter of courtship; LOVE'-LIES-BLEED'ING, a species of the plant Amaranthus; LOVE'LINESS; LOVE'LOCK, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.--adj. LOVE'LORN, forsaken by one's love.--n. LOVE'LORNNESS.--adj. LOVE'LY, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.--adv. beautifully, delightfully.--ns. LOVE'-MATCH, a marriage for love, not money; LOVE'-MONG'[.E]R, one who deals in affairs of love; LOVE'-P[=O]'TION, a philtre; LOV'ER, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.--adjs. LOV'ERED (Shak.), having a lover; LOV'ERLY, like a lover.--n. LOVE'-SHAFT, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.--adjs. LOVE'-SICK, languishing with amorous desire; LOVE'SOME, lovely.--ns. LOVE'-SUIT (Shak.), courtship; LOVE'-T[=O]'KEN, a gift in evidence of love.--adj. LOV'ING, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.--ns. LOV'ING-CUP (see under CUP); LOV'ING-KIND'NESS, kindness full of love: tender regard: mercy: favour.--adv. LOV'INGLY.--n. LOV'INGNESS.--FOR LOVE OR MONEY, in some way or another; IN LOVE, enamoured; MAKE LOVE TO, to try to gain the affections of; PLAY FOR LOVE, to play without stakes; THERE'S NO LOVE LOST BETWEEN THEM, they have no regard for each other. [A.S. lufu, love; Ger. liebe; cf. L. libet, lubet.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. A tender and elevated feeling, which attracts one sex to the other. Love is occasionally a cause of disease, especially of insanity. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  59. Warm affection, attachment, liking, or fondness, paternal benevolence, affectionate devotion, (of, for, to, or towards person, for or to thing; give l. to, convey affectionate message to, send one\'s l. to, get this done; for the l. of, for sake or in name of, esp. in adjurations; for l. or money, by any means, esp. cannot get it &c. f. l. o. m.; labour of l., that one delights in, or that one does for l. of some one; there\'s no l. lost between them, they dislike each other; play for l., for the pleasure of it, not for stakes); sexual affection or passion or desire, relation between sweethearts, this feeling as a literary subject, a personified influence, or a god (also representation of Cupid, or of naked winged child, or in pl. children, symbolizing l.), (in l., possessed by this; in l. with, enamoured of, also transf. fond of a pursuit, thing, &c.; fall in l., become enamoured; all\'s fair in l. & war; l. in a cottage, marriage on insufficient means; make l., pay amorous attentions to or abs., whence love making n.); beloved one, sweetheart, (esp. of woman, cf. lover; hence lovey n.; my l., common form of address between husband& wife), (colloq.) delightful person or pretty thing (he is an old l.; what ll. of teacups!); (Games) no score, nothing, nil, (l. all, neither side has yet scored; l. game, in which loser has not scored); l.-affair, amour; l.-begotten, illegitimate; l.-bird, small bird of parrot kind said to pine away at death of its mate; l.-child, illegitimate; l.-feast, meal in token of brotherly l. among early Christians, religious service among Methodists &c. imitating this; l.-in-a-mist, Fennel-flower; l.-in-idleness, Heart\'sease; l.-knot, peculiarly interlaced bow of ribbon; l.-letter, between sweethearts& concerned with l.; l.-lies-bleeding, garden plant with long drooping spike of purple-red bloom; lovelock, tress or curl worn on temple or forehead; l.-lorn, pining with l., deserted by one\'s love (r); l.-match, marriage made for l.\'s sake only; l.-philtre, philtre; lovesick, languishing with l.; l.-song, about or expressing l.; l.-story, novel &c. of which main theme is l., facts of a wooing &c.; l.-token, thing given in sign of l. Hence loveworthy a., loveworthiness n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Hold dear, bear l. to, be in l. with, be fond of, (l. me, I. my dog; lord l. you!, excl. of surprise at person\'s mistake &c.; l. one\'s l. with an A, a B, &c., formula in game of forfeits); be in l.; cling to, delight in, enjoy having, be addicted to, admire or be glad of the existence of, (life, houour, comfort, golf, doing, virtue, man who knows his own mind, &c.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. (Also, w. inf.) be (habitually) inclined (children l. to ape their elders); (colloq.) like, be delighted, (he simply loves to find mistakes; Will you come?-I should l. to). Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for love?

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