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Definitions of lower

  1. To appear dark or gloomy; to threaten a storm; to frown. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To bring down; make or become lower; humble; sink. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To lesson or bring down; reduce in price or value; weaken; humble; change to a less high pitch. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To bring low: to depress: to degrade: to diminish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To let down; depress; degrade; lessen. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To fall; to sink; to grow less; to diminish; to decrease; as, the river lowered as rapidly as it rose. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To be dark, gloomy, and threatening, as clouds; to be covered with dark and threatening clouds, as the sky; to show threatening signs of approach, as a tempest. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To frown; to look sullen. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To become less high; sink; fall; to appear dark, gloomy, or threatening. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To fall: to sink: to grow less. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To gather and appear gloomy, as the clouds: to threaten a storm: to frown. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To appear gloomy; frown. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. To descend; lessen. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. To look angry; scowl. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. look angry or sullen, wrinkle one's forehead, as if to signal disapproval Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. make lower or quieter; "turn down the volume of a radio" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. To let down; to bring down; to humble; to diminish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. To bring low; to cause to descend; to bring down; to lessen; to humble or degrade; to enfeeble; to sink. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. Cloudiness; gloominess. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A frowning; sullenness. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. LOWERINGLY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. inferior in rank or status; "the junior faculty"; "a lowly corporal"; "petty officialdom"; "a subordinate functionary" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. the bottom one of two; "he chose the lower number" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. move something or somebody to a lower position; "take down the vase from the shelf" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. (usually preceded by `no') lower in esteem; "no less a person than the king himself" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. Compar. of Low, a. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To let descend by its own weight, as something suspended; to let down; as, to lower a bucket into a well; to lower a sail or a boat; sometimes, to pull down; as, to lower a flag. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To reduce the height of; as, to lower a fence or wall; to lower a chimney or turret. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To depress as to direction; as, to lower the aim of a gun; to make less elevated as to object; as, to lower one's ambition, aspirations, or hopes. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To reduce the degree, intensity, strength, etc., of; as, to lower the temperature of anything; to lower one's vitality; to lower distilled liquors. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To bring down; to humble; as, to lower one's pride. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Comp. of low; less high or elevated. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for lower?

Usage examples for lower

  1. You are to stay with me, and be as happy as you can, and because you are sweet enough still to look after Baba, that does not lower you in anyone's eyes. – Christina by L. G. Moberly
  2. She found herself talking in a lower tone than usual, and quite slowly, when she answered. – The Little Colonel at Boarding-School by Annie Fellows Johnston
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