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Definitions of mace

  1. (trademark) a liquid that temporarily disables a person; prepared as an aerosol and sprayed in the face, it irritates the eyes and causes dizziness and immobilization Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a ceremonial staff carried as a symbol of office or authority Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. spice made from the dried fleshy covering of the nutmeg seed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an official who carries a mace of office Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. A money of account in China equal to one tenth of a tael; also, a weight of 57.98 grains. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A kind of spice; the aril which partly covers nutmegs. See Nutmeg. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A staff borne by, or carried before, a magistrate as an ensign of his authority. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. An officer who carries a mace as an emblem of authority. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A knobbed mallet used by curriers in dressing leather to make it supple. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A rod for playing billiards, having one end suited to resting on the table and pushed with one hand. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A heavy staff or club of metal; a spiked club; - used as weapon in war before the general use of firearms, especially in the Middle Ages, for breaking metal armor. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A potent eye, throat, and skin irritant. One of its uses is as a riot control agent. Medical Dictionary DB
  13. A large and heavy staff usually topped by a crown; a staff carried by or before an official as a symbol of authority; a person who bears such a staff; a kind of aromatic spice consisting of the dried covering of the nutmeg. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. Arillus myristicae, the arillode, or husk, surrounding the nutmeg; employed for the same purposes as nutmeg. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  15. Condiment; mild narcotic, obtained from myristica. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  16. A staff used as an ensign of authority: the heavier rod used in billiards: formerly, a weapon of offence, consisting of a staff headed with a heavy spiked ball of iron. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. A spice, the second coat of the nutmeg. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. A metallic club; ensign of authority; aromatic inner coat of the nutmeg. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. A club-shaped staff of office; an officer who carries it. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. A spice made from the covering of the nutmeg-seed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. A kind of club; an ensign of authority borne before magistrates; the heavier rod used in billiards. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. A spice; the external envelope of the seed of the nutmeg. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. The insignia of authority in the form of a club, and generally surmounted by a crown, borne before high officials, as mayors, lord provosts, the Speaker of the House of Commons, the Lord Chancellor, &c.; anciently, a weapon of war in the form of a club; the heavy rod used at billiards. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  24. A spice; the aril or second coat of the nutmeg. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. A heavy staff or club of metal; a spiked club; -- used as weapon in war before the general use of firearms, especially in the Middle Ages, for breaking metal armor. mso.anu.edu.au
  26. A large staff, made of the precious metals, aud highly ornamented. It Is used as an emblem of authority, and carried before certain public functionaries by a mace- bearer. In many legislative bodies, the mace is employed as a visible symbol of the dig- nity and collective authority of the house. In the house of lords and house of commons of the Rritish parliament, it is laid upon the table when the house is in session. In the United States house of representatives, it is borne upright by the sergeant-at-arms on extraordinary occasions, as when it is necessary to quell a disturbance or bring refrac- tory members to order. thelawdictionary.org
  27. A heavy staff or club of metal; a spiked club; used as weapon in war before the general use of firearms, especially in the Middle Ages, for breaking metal armor. dictgcide_fs
  28. An officer who carries a mace as an emblem of authority; a macebearer. dictgcide_fs
  29. A chemical preparation containing tear gas in a solvent, packaged in the form of a spray, and used to temporarily incapacitate people, such as rioters or criminals, by causing intense eye and skin irritation; also called chemical mace. It is designed to be a non-lethal weapon for defending against violent people. dictgcide_fs
  30. m[=a]s, n. a staff used as a mark of authority: a light, flat-headed stick in use at billiards before the introduction of the bridge or cue-rest: formerly, a weapon of war, consisting of a staff headed with a heavy spiked ball of iron: a mallet used by a currier in dressing leather.--n. MACE'-BEAR'ER, one who carries the mace in a procession, or before men in authority--also MAC'ER. [O. Fr. mace (Fr. masse)--obs. L. matea, whence L. dim. mateola, a mallet.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. m[=a]s, n. a kind of spice: the second coat of the nutmeg. [O. Fr. macis--L. macer--Gr. maker.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  32. See Myristica moschata- m. Reed, Typha latifolia. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  33. [Latin] The envelope of the seed of the nutmeg (Myristica fragrans). It contains a volatile oil (Oleum macidis, G. P.) consisting mainly of Macene, C10H16, and is an aromatic used mainly as a condiment and flavoring agent. na
  34. (Hist.) heavy usu. metal-headed& spiked club; staff of office resembling this; m.-bearer, official carrying this staff; stick used in bagatelle. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. Dried outer covering of nutmeg, used as spice. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. A spice; the aril which envelops nutmeg. American pocket medical dictionary.
  37. The aril of the nutmeg (fruit of Myristica fragrans). [Lat.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. The mace used in the House of Representatives from 1789 on (ebony fasces surmounted by a silver eagle upon a silver globe) was destroyed when the British burned the Capitol in 1814. The present one was made in 1842. Dictionary of United States history
  39. [Fr.] (Mil.) A weapon used by cavalry; a species of club, with large fixed head, or hanging loose by chains. In the first form it is still used as an ensign of authority. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  40. [It.] The aril - a body which rises up from the placenta and encompasses the seed - of the nutmeg, used as a spice. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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