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Definitions of magic

  1. possessing or using or characteristic of or appropriate to supernatural powers; "charming incantations"; "magic signs that protect against adverse influence"; "a magical spell"; "'tis now the very witching time of night"- Shakespeare; "wizard wands"; "wizardly powers" Webster Dictionary DB
  2. an illusory feat; considered magical by naive observers Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any art that invokes supernatural powers Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces in nature attained by a study of occult science, including enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy, incantation, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Alt. of Magical Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Beliefs and practices concerned with producing desired results through supernatural forces or agents as with the manipulation of fetishes or rituals. Medical Dictionary DB
  7. Sleight of hand. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. The pretended art of working by power over the hidden forces of nature or by the assistance of supernatural beings; sorcery; witchcraft; enchantment; any hidden or secret power; as, the magic of beauty. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. Pertaining to, produced by, or exercising more than, human power; enchanted. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Magical. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. Magically. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. The science of the Magi: the pretended art of producing marvellous results contrary to nature, generally by evoking spirits: enchantment: sorcery. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Enchantment; sorcery; jugglery. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. Magic, magical. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. Of the nature of magic; having magical power; magical. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Any supposed supernatural art; necromancy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Pertaining to, or used by magic, employing magic; as if done by magic. Magic square, a series of numbers so arranged in a square that the vertical, horizontal, and diagonal columns give the same sum. Magic lantern, an optical instrument by means of which images of small pictures, considerably magnified, are exhibited upon a wall or screen in a dark room. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. The pretended art of bringing into action the agency of supernatural beings; a wonderful effect produced in some mysterious way; sorcery; witchcraft. Natural magic, the art of employing the powers of nature to produce effects apparently supernatural. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. The pretended art or science of working by the aid or power of spirits; sorcery; enchantment; the secret operation of natural causes, as natural magic. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. The Jews seem early to have consulted the teraphim (q.v.) for oracular answers ( Judges 18:5 Judges 18:6 ; Zechariah 10:2 ). There is a remarkable illustration of this divining by teraphim in Ezek. 21:19-22 . We read also of the divining cup of Joseph ( Genesis 44:5 ). The magicians of Egypt are frequently referred to in the history of the Exodus. Magic was an inherent part of the ancient Egyptian religion, and entered largely into their daily life. All magical arts were distinctly prohibited under penalty of death in the Mosaic law. The Jews were commanded not to learn the "abomination" of the people of the Promised Land ( Leviticus 19:31 ; Deuteronomy 18:9-14 ). The history of Saul's consulting the witch of Endor ( 1 Samuel 28:3-20 ) gives no warrant for attributing supernatural power to magicians. From the first the witch is here only a bystander. The practice of magic lingered among the people till after the Captivity, when they gradually abandoned it. It is not much referred to in the New Testament. The Magi mentioned in Matthew 2:1-12 were not magicians in the ordinary sense of the word. They belonged to a religious caste, the followers of Zoroaster, the astrologers of the East. Simon, a magician, was found by Philip at Samaria ( Acts 8:9-24 ); and Paul and Barnabas encountered Elymas, a Jewish sorcerer, at Paphos ( 13:6-12 ). At Ephesus there was a great destruction of magical books ( Acts 19:18 Acts 19:19 ). biblestudytools.com
  21. In English statutes. Witchcraft and sorcery. thelawdictionary.org
  22. The art of creating illusions which appear to the observer to be inexplicable except by some supernatural influence; it includes simple sleight of hand (legerdemain) as well as more elaborate stage magic, using special devices constructed to produce mystifying effects; as, the magic of David Copperfield. It is practised as an entertainment, by magicians who do not pretend to have supernatural powers. dictgcide_fs
  23. maj'ik, n. the pretended art of producing marvellous results by the aid of spirits, or of the secret forces of nature: enchantment: sorcery.--adjs. MAG'IC, -AL, pertaining to, used in, or done by magic: causing wonderful or startling results.--adv. MAG'ICALLY.--ns. MAGIC'IAN, one skilled in magic: a wizard: an enchanter; MAG'IC-LAN'TERN (see LANTERN).--MAGIC SQUARE, a square filled with rows of figures so arranged that the sums of all the rows will be the same, perpendicularly or horizontally--as 2, 7, 6; 9, 5, 1; 4, 3, 8, &c.; there are also MAGIC CIRCLES, CUBES, CYLINDERS, and SPHERES similarly arranged.--BLACK MAGIC, the black art, magic by means of union with evil spirits; NATURAL MAGIC, the art of working wonders by a superior knowledge of the powers of nature; WHITE MAGIC, magic without the aid of the devil. [O. Fr. magique--L.,--Gr. See MAGI.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. (Of) the pretended art of influencing course of events by occult control of nature or of spirits, witchcraft; black, white, m. (involving, not involving, invocation of devils); inexplicable or remarkable influence producing surprising results; m. square, one divided into smaller squares containing each a number, so arranged that sum of a row, vertical, horizontal, or diagonal, is always same; m. lantern, optical instrument throwing magnified image of glass picture on white screen in dark room. Hence magical a., magically adv. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n.[Latin]The science or practice of evoking and employing supernatural or diabolic agency, or of raising departed spirits of men; witch craft; sorcery; necromancy the secret operations of the powers and forces of nature— often employed so to impress with the idea, of a supernatural or diabolic power; natural magic. Cabinet Dictionary

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