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Definitions of magnet

  1. a device that attracts iron and produces a magnetic field Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (physics) a device that attracts iron and produces a magnetic field Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. a characteristic that provides pleasure and attracts; "flowers are an attractor for bees" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; - called also natural magnet. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; - called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. The loadstone; a variety of ore having the property of attracting iron; a steel bar having the power to attract iron artificially given to it; a person or thing that attracts. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. Lodestone, magnetite, native magnetic oxide of iron, a body which has the property of attracting particles of iron and which has magnetic polarity, i.e. when freely suspended, it tends to assume a definite direction between the magnetic poles of the earth. This is a natural magnet; an artificial magnet is a bar or horseshoe-shaped piece of iron which has been made magnetic by contact with another magnet. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  8. The lodestone, an iron ore which attracts iron, and, when freely suspended, points to the poles: a bar or piece of steel to which the properties of the lodestone have been imparted. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. The lodestone; piece of iron or steel having the properties of the lodestone, viz.; attracting iron and pointing to the poles. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. A body capable of attracting to itself iron and steel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. The loadstone; a steel bar to which the properties of the loadstone have been imparted. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. The loadstone, which has the property of attracting iron, and of pointing to the poles when freely suspended; a bar of steel, to which the properties of the loadstone are imparted by contact; any piece of iron rendered powerfully attractive by a galvanic current; any powerful attraction. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. The loadstone; a species of iron ore the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4 which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; -- called also natural magnet. mso.anu.edu.au
  14. A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; -- called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet. mso.anu.edu.au
  15. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; called also natural magnet. dictgcide_fs
  16. A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet. dictgcide_fs
  17. mag'net, n. the lodestone, an iron ore which attracts iron, and, when hung so that it can move freely, points to the poles: a bar or piece of steel to which the properties of the lodestone have been imparted.--adjs. MAGNET'IC, -AL, pertaining to the magnet: having the properties of the magnet: attractive.--adv. MAGNET'ICALLY.--ns. MAGNETIC'IAN, MAG'NETIST, one versed in magnetism.--adj. MAGNETIS'ABLE.--n. MAGNETIS[=A]'TION.--v.t. MAG'NETISE, to render magnetic: to attract as if by a magnet.--v.i. to become magnetic.--ns. MAG'NETISER, one who, or that which, imparts magnetism; MAG'NETISM, the cause of the attractive power of the magnet: attraction: the science which treats of the properties of the magnet-- (ANIMAL MAGNETISM, Mesmer's name for the phenomena of mesmerism; TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM, the magnetic properties possessed by the earth as a whole); MAG'NETIST, one skilled in magnetism.--adjs. MAG'NETO-ELEC'TRIC, -AL, pertaining to magneto-electricity.--ns. MAG'NETO-ELECTRIC'ITY, electricity produced by the action of magnets: the science which treats of electricity produced by magnetism; BAR'-MAG'NET, a magnet in the form of a bar.--MAGNETIC BATTERY, several magnets placed with their like poles together, so as to act with great force; MAGNETIC CURVES, the curves formed by iron-filings around the poles of a magnet; MAGNETIC EQUATOR, the line round the earth where the magnetic needle remains horizontal; MAGNETIC FIELD, the space over which magnetic force is felt; MAGNETIC FLUID, a hypothetical fluid assumed to explain the phenomena of magnetism; MAGNETIC MERIDIAN, the meridian lying in the direction in which the magnetic needle points; MAGNETIC NEEDLE, the light bar in the mariner's compass which, because it is magnetised, points always to the north; MAGNETIC NORTH, that point of the horizon which is indicated by the direction of the magnetic needle; MAGNETIC POLES, two nearly opposite points on the earth's surface, where the dip of the needle is 90°; MAGNETIC STORM, a disturbance in the magnetism of the earth or air, which causes the magnetic needle to move rapidly backwards and forwards.--ARTIFICIAL MAGNET, a magnet made by rubbing with other magnets; HORSE-SHOE MAGNET, a magnet bent like a horse-shoe; PERMANENT MAGNET, a magnet that keeps its magnetism after the force which magnetised it has been removed. [Through O. Fr., from L. magnes, a magnet--Gr. magn[=e]s=Magnesian stone, from Magn[=e]sia, in Lydia or Thessaly.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  18. called from Magnes, its discoverer, or from Magnesia, where it is said to have been first found. (F.) Aimant, Pierre d'Aimant. The magnet or loadstous. An amorphous, oxydulated ore of iron, which exerts an attraction on unmagnetized iron, and has the property of exhibiting poles; that is, of pointing by one of its extremities to the north. This ore, by constant or long rubbing, communicates its properties to iron; and thus artificial magnets are formed. Magnetic is found in many countries, and particularly on the island of Elba. The magnet is sometimes used to extract spicula of iron from the eye or from wounds. It has been employed as an antispasmodic; but acts only through the imagination. The powder has been given as a tonic. In Pharmacy, it is used to purify iron filings. It attracts the iron, and the impurities remain behind. It formerly entered, as an ingredient, into several plasters, to draw bullets and heads of arrows from the body- as the Emplastrum divinum Nicolai, the Emplastrum nigrum of Augsburg, the Opodeldoch, and Attractivum of Paracelsus, etc. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  19. [Greek] A substance which has the property of attracting iron, of attracting or repelling bodies similar to itself, and when freely suspended of turning so that its extremities (north and south poles) turn toward fixed points (the Magnetic poles)which are situated approximately north and south. The amount by which a m. deviates from the true north depends partly upon the situation of the m. upon the earth’s surface (Magnetic variation), partly upon the influence of iron in the vicinity of the m. (Magnetic deviation and Local attraction). A freely suspended m. also deviates from the horizontal plane through an angle called the Dip or Declination. Natural m., an oxide of iron (Magnetic oxide, ferroso-ferric oxide), Fe3O4, which is found native. See iron oxide. Artificial m., a piece of iron or steel which has been rendered magnetic by contact with a m. or in other ways. Electro-m., a piece of soft iron rendered magnetic by the inductive action of a galvanic current passing through a coil of wire surrounding it. Permanent m., a m. which retains its properties indefinitely; usually bent in the form of a horseshoe (Horseshoe m.), so as to approximate the two poles. Temporary m., a m. (e. g., an electro-m.) which remains magnetic only while the influences that render it so are still acting. Compound m., a collection of m’s with their similar poles adjacent, so as to reinforce one another. M’s have been used in the treatment of nervous diseases and to withdraw particles of iron from the body, and particularly from the eye. na
  20. Piece of iron or steel to which properties of loadstone have been imparted by contact with another m., by induction, or by electric current; =load stone; (fig.) thing that attracts. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. A substance possessing the property of attracting iron, also other substances (especially nickel) in a much feebler degree, and of being itself attracted by those substances. The points at or near the ends of a magnetic bar where such attraction is concentrated, and which, owing to the earth's magnetic attraction, assume a position toward the north and south respectively, are the poles of the magnet. There are two kinds of m's, the natural m.-loadstone, magnetic iron oxid (q. v., under iron)-and artificial m's (i. e., bars or needles of steel), which have acquired magnetic properties from being rubbed with a m., or otherwise. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  22. [Gr.] A body, commonly a piece of steel, which has the property of attracting pieces of iron to its poles or ends. An Electro-Magnet is a magnet formed of a core consisting of a rod, or bundle of rods, of wrought iron round which an electric current circulates. If a bar of steel is used as a core instead of soft wrought iron, it retains its magnetic power after the current has ceased to circulate. In this way magnets are commonly made, though certain kinds of iron ore, called lodestones, are natural magnets; and magnets used to be made by touching steel needles with a lodestone. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  23. n. [Latin] The loadstone; a species of iron ore which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles;— a bar of steel or iron to which the properties of the loadstone have been Imparted— called an artificial magnet. Cabinet Dictionary

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