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Definitions of mass

  1. (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "it must have cost plenty" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the property of something that is great in magnitude; "it is cheaper to buy it in bulk"; "he received a mass of correspondence"; "the volume of exports" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the common people generally; "separate the warriors from the mass"; "power to the people" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. occurring widely (as to many people); "mass destruction" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. join together into a mass; collect or form a mass; of crowds of people; "Crowds were massing outside the palace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the celebration of the Eucharist (in the Roman Catholic Church and some Protestant Churches) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a sequence of prayers constituting the Christian eucharistic rite; "the priest said Mass" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a musical setting for a Mass; "they played a Mass composed by Beethoven" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. an ill-structured collection of similar things (objects or people) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a body of matter without definite shape; "a huge ice mass" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. (Roman Catholic Church and Protestant Churches) the celebration of the Eucharist Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. join together into a mass or collect or form a mass; "Crowds were massing outside the palace" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. gathered or tending to gather into a mass or whole; "aggregate expenses include expenses of all divisions combined for the entire year"; "the aggregated amount of indebtedness" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. The sacrifice in the sacrament of the Eucharist, or the consecration and oblation of the host. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The portions of the Mass usually set to music, considered as a musical composition; -- namely, the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei, besides sometimes an Offertory and the Benedictus. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. To celebrate Mass. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size; as, a mass of ore, metal, sand, or water. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A large quantity; a sum. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Bulk; magnitude; body; size. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The principal part; the main body. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The portions of the usually set to music, considered as a musical composition; - namely, the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei, besides sometimes an Offertory and the Benedictus. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The celebration of the Holy Communion in the Roman Catholic Church; a musical setting for certain parts of such a celebration: mass, the measure of the quantity of mattre in a body; a large quantity; lump; body of things collectively. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To collect into a lump or body. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. 1. A lump or aggregation of coherent material. 2. In pharmacy a soft solid preparation containing an active medicinal agent, of such consistency that it can be divided into small pieces and rolled into pills. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  29. Product of mixed drugs. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  30. A lump of matter: a quantity: a collected body: the gross body: magnitude: the principal part or main body: quantity of matter in any body. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To form into a mass: to assemble in masses. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. The celebration of the Lord's Supper in R. Cath. churches. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. A lump; bulk; quantity of matter; assemblage; the Lord's Supper in the Catholic Church. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To form into a mass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. An assemblage; principal part; quantity of matter in a body. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. The celebration of the eucharist in the Roman Catholic Church. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A lump: a body of matter concreted, collected, or formed into a heap; a collective body; a heap; magnitude; an assemblage; the body or main body; quantity of matter. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. In the Roman Catholic Church, the consecration and oblation of the host in the Eucharist. High mass, that which is publicly performed on high occasions or festivals with music. Low mass, that which is merely read. Massbook, the missal, or Rom. Cath. Service-book. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To collect into a mass or body. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. A body or lump; a large quantity; a heap; the quantity of matter in any body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To form into a mass; to form into a collective body; to assemble. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The celebration of the Eucharist in the R. Cath. Ch.; the sacrifice of the mass, or the celebration of the Lord's Supper in the R. Cath. Ch.; high mass, that which is sung or chanted, low mass being only read. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. The portions of the Mass usually set to music, considered as a musical composition; namely, the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei, besides sometimes an Offertory and the Benedictus. dictgcide_fs
  44. mas, n. a lump of matter: a quantity: a collected body: the main body: magnitude: the principal part or main body: quantity of matter in any body, weight being proportional to mass: (pl.) the lower classes of the people.--v.t. to form into a mass: to bring together in masses.--v.i. to assemble in masses.--adj. MASS'IVE, bulky: weighty: not separated into parts or elements: without crystalline form, geologically homogeneous.--adv. MASS'IVELY.--ns. MASS'IVENESS, MASS'INESS; MASS'-MEETING, a public meeting of persons of all classes to discuss some matter of general interest.--adj. MASS'Y, massive, made up of masses. [Fr. masse--L. massa--Gr. maza--massein, to squeeze together.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. mas, n. the celebration of the Lord's Supper or Eucharist in R.C. churches, also the office for the same: a musical setting of certain parts of the R.C. liturgy: a church festival or feast-day, as in Candlemas, Christmas, Martinmas, &c.--ns. MASS'-BELL, or Sacring-bell, a bell rung during the celebration of mass, at the elevation of the host; MASS'-BOOK, the R.C. missal or service-book; MASS'-PRIEST, formerly a R.C. secular priest, as distinct from those living under a rule--later, a priest retained in chantries, &c., to say masses for the dead: a R.C. priest generally.--MASS FOR THE DEAD, a funeral mass for the faithful in Christ, to hasten their release from purgatory; CONVENTUAL MASS, a mass for the general community of a religious house: a mass at which special remembrance is made of pious founders and benefactors; DRY MASS, or SERVICE, a rite in which there is neither consecration nor communion; HIGH MASS, a mass celebrated with music, ritual, ceremonies, and incense; LOW MASS, the ordinary mass celebrated without music and incense; MIDNIGHT MASS, that mass which is said at midnight on Christmas-eve; PRIVATE MASS, any mass where only the priest communicates, esp. in a private oratory; SOLEMN MASS, a mass resembling a high mass, but without some of its special ceremonies; VOTIVE MASS, a special mass over and above those ordinarily said for the day, for some particular grace or purpose, and provided by some individual. [A.S. mæsse--Low L. missa--L. missus, mitt[)e]re, to send away, from the phrase at the close of service, Ite, missa est (ecclesia), 'Go, the congregation is dismissed.'] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  46. The compound, from which pills have to be formed. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  47. [Latin, Greek] A collection of particles cohering to form a single body. na
  48. [Latin, Greek] Hence, of U. S. Pharmacopoeia, a substance or aggregation of substances made into a cohesive solid mixture for division into pills; also called a Pill-m. (Massa pilularum) or Pill (Pilula, B. P.). Blue m., massa hydrargyri (see Mercury). Vallet’s m., massa ferri carbonatis (see Iron carbonate). na
  49. [Latin, Greek] in physics, the amount of matter which a body contains. na
  50. (A) celebration (now usu. Rom. Cath.) of the Eucharist, as m. was said, we attend, go to, hear, m., mm. were said for his soul; liturgy used in this; musical setting of parts of this; high m. (with incense, music, & assistance of deacon& subdeacon); low m. (with no music& minimum of ceremony). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. Coherent body of matter of indefinite shape; dense aggregation of objects, as a m. of fibres; large number (of); he is a m. of (covered with) bruises; unbroken expanse (of light &c.); the (great) m., the majority (of); the mm., the lower orders, of, CLASSES; in the m., in the aggregate; (Physics) quantity of matter a body contains; m. meeting, large (usu. political) assembly of people; (vb) gather (t. & i.) into m., (Mil.) concentrate (troops). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  52. A body made up of coherent particles. American pocket medical dictionary.
  53. Any agglomeration of matter; in pharmacy, a solid or semisolid mixture of a number of ingredients. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  54. [L.L.] The Eucharistic Office in the Latin Church ; so named, it is said, from the words of dismissal, ' ' Ite missa est ; " but this is doubtful. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  55. In Physics, the quantity of matter in a given body ; it is proportional to the weight. If two bodies exactly counterpoise each other in a perfectly just balance, they have equal masses. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  56. n. [Latin] A body of matter assembled or formed into a lump; a great quantity collected; a heap; an assemblage;— bulk; magnitude; size;— chief component portion; principal part; main body;— the quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume;— pl. The people; the lower classes. Cabinet Dictionary

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