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Definitions of mast

  1. To furnish with a mast or masts; to put the masts of in position; as, to mast a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To supply with a mast or masts. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. To supply with masts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  4. a vertical spar for supporting sails Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. any sturdy upright pole Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. nuts of forest trees used as feed for swine Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. The fruit of the oak and beech, or other forest trees; nuts; acorns. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A pole, or long, strong, round piece of timber, or spar, set upright in a boat or vessel, to sustain the sails, yards, rigging, etc. A mast may also consist of several pieces of timber united by iron bands, or of a hollow pillar of iron or steel. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The vertical post of a derrick or crane. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A spar or strut to which tie wires or guys are attached for stiffening purposes. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A long round piece of timber or iron tube, raised upright on the keel, through the decks, of a vessel to support the sails; any upright pole; the fruit of the oak, beech, etc., especially when used as food for swine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. The fruit of the oak, beech, chestnut, and other forest trees, on which swine feed: nuts, acorns. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Upright pole sustaining the yards, &c., of a ship; fruit of forest trees. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. An upright spar to sustain the yards, sails, etc., of a vessel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Nuts, acorns, etc., as food for animals. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. The fruit of the oak and beech, or other forest trees; acorns, nuts, &c. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. One of the large upright timbers or poles which support the rigging of a ship. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. The fruit of oaks or beech-trees used for fattening hogs. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for mast?

Usage examples for mast

  1. He was remembering that it was one his grandfather had cracked for him and made into a boat by the addition of matches for seats and mast – Secret Bread by F. Tennyson Jesse
  2. I was bothered about the rest, as I knew the bears were likely to come down; but I found a ledge on the face of the perpendicular rock, and by putting the boat's mast against it I was able to get up to it. – The Treasure of the Incas by G. A. Henty
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