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Definitions of mast

  1. nuts of forest trees (as beechnuts and acorns) accumulated on the ground; used especially as food for swine Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a vertical spar for supporting sails Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any sturdy upright pole Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. nuts of forest trees used as feed for swine Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. The fruit of the oak and beech, or other forest trees; nuts; acorns. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A pole, or long, strong, round piece of timber, or spar, set upright in a boat or vessel, to sustain the sails, yards, rigging, etc. A mast may also consist of several pieces of timber united by iron bands, or of a hollow pillar of iron or steel. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The vertical post of a derrick or crane. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To furnish with a mast or masts; to put the masts of in position; as, to mast a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A spar or strut to which tie wires or guys are attached for stiffening purposes. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A long round piece of timber or iron tube, raised upright on the keel, through the decks, of a vessel to support the sails; any upright pole; the fruit of the oak, beech, etc., especially when used as food for swine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. A long upright pole for sustaining the yards, rigging, etc., in a ship. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To supply with a mast or masts. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. The fruit of the oak, beech, chestnut, and other forest trees, on which swine feed: nuts, acorns. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. Upright pole sustaining the yards, &c., of a ship; fruit of forest trees. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. An upright spar to sustain the yards, sails, etc., of a vessel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Nuts, acorns, etc., as food for animals. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A long round piece of timber, &c., elevated perpendicularly on the keel of a ship for supporting the sails. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. The fruit of the oak and beech, or other forest trees; acorns, nuts, &c. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To supply with masts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. One of the large upright timbers or poles which support the rigging of a ship. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. The fruit of oaks or beech-trees used for fattening hogs. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. To fatten with mast, (acorns, etc.) 1 Leon. ISO. thelawdictionary.org
  23. mast, n. a long upright pole for bearing the yards, rigging, &c. in a ship.--v.t. to supply with a mast or masts.--adj. MAST'ED.--n. MAST'-HEAD, the head or top of the mast of a ship.--v.t. to raise to the mast-head: to punish by sending a sailor to the mast-head for a certain time.--n. MAST'-HOUSE, the place in dockyards where masts are made.--adj. MAST'LESS, having no mast. [A.S. mæst, the stem of a tree; Ger. mast.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. mast, n. the fruit of the oak, beech, chestnut, and other forest trees, on which swine feed: nuts, acorns.--adjs. MAST'FUL; MAST'LESS; MAST'Y. [A.S. mæst; Ger. mast, whence mästen, to feed.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  25. Long pole of timber, iron, &c., set up on ship\'s keel to support sails; BEFORE the m.; HALF-m. high; m.-head, highest part of m., esp. of lower mast as place of observation or punishment, (v.t.) send (sailor) to this, raise (sail) to its position. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  26. Fruit of beech, oak, & other foresttrees, esp. as food for swine. [West German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  27. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A pole Bet upright in a boat or vessel to sustain the sails, yards, rigging &c. Cabinet Dictionary
  28. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The fruit of the oak and beech or other forest trees; nuts; acorns. Cabinet Dictionary

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