Spellcheck.net

Definitions of master

  1. an officer who is licensed to command a merchant ship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. have dominance or the power to defeat over; "Her pain completely mastered her"; "The methods can master the problems" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. get on top of; deal with successfully; "He overcame his shyness" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. be or become completely proficient or skilled in; "She mastered Japanese in less than two years" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. presiding officer of a school Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a person who has general authority over others Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an artist of consummate skill; "a master of the violin"; "one of the old masters" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an original creation (i.e., an audio recording) from which copies can be made Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. key that secures entrance everywhere Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. an authority qualified to teach apprentices Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. directs the work of other Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. someone who holds a master's degree from academic institution Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. have a firm understanding or knowledge of; be on top of; "Do you control these data?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. controlling; "master race"; "master plan" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. highly skilled or proficient; "a master plumber"; "a master thief" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. a combatant who is able to defeat rivals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. A male person having another living being so far subject to his will, that he can, in the main, control his or its actions; -- formerly used with much more extensive application than now. (a) The employer of a servant. (b) The owner of a slave. (c) The person to whom an apprentice is articled. (d) A sovereign, prince, or feudal noble; a chief, or one exercising similar authority. (e) The head of a household. (f) The male head of a school or college. (g) A male teacher. (h) The director of a number of persons performing a ceremony or sharing a feast. (i) The owner of a docile brute, -- especially a dog or horse. (j) The controller of a familiar spirit or other supernatural being. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. One who uses, or controls at will, anything inanimate; as, to be master of one's time. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. One who has attained great skill in the use or application of anything; as, a master of oratorical art. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A young gentleman; a lad, or small boy. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The commander of a merchant vessel; -- usually called captain. Also, a commissioned officer in the navy ranking next above ensign and below lieutenant; formerly, an officer on a man-of-war who had immediate charge, under the commander, of sailing the vessel. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. A person holding an office of authority among the Freemasons, esp. the presiding officer; also, a person holding a similar office in other civic societies. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To become the master of; to subject to one's will, control, or authority; to conquer; to overpower; to subdue. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To gain the command of, so as to understand or apply; to become an adept in; as, to master a science. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To own; to posses. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To be skillful; to excel. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A vessel having (so many) masts; - used only in compounds; as, a two-master. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A title given by courtesy, now commonly pronounced mister, except when given to boys; - sometimes written Mister, but usually abbreviated to Mr. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The commander of a merchant vessel; - usually called captain. Also, a commissioned officer in the navy ranking next above ensign and below lieutenant. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. One who rules or commands people or things; director; employer; owner; head of a household, college, school, etc.; an expert; winner in a contest; a great artist; a skilled workman; commander of a merchant vessel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Exercising control; chief; skilled. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. To subdue or overcome; conquer; as, to master a task; to excel in: Master, a person holding an advanced university degree; a title used before the names of boys; a legal title. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. One who commands: a lord or owner: a leader or ruler: a teacher: an employer: the commander of a merchant-ship: the officer who navigates a ship-of-war under the captain: a degree in universities: one eminently skilled in anything: the common title of address to a young gentleman. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. Belonging to a master, chief, principal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. To become master of: to overcome: to become skillful in: to execute with skill. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. In many compounds-chief, as in MASTER-BUILDER, MASTER-MASON, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. (in compounds) chief; excellent. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. A ruler; owner; teacher; employer; degree in universities; one of distinguished skill in anything; title of address. esp. to a youth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To become master of; conquer; become skilful in. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To overpower; subdue; rule; know; understand thoroughly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Controlling; chief. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A commander; teacher; employer; owner. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. An adept, as in an art or profession. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A man who rules, governs, or directs: a director; owner: ruler; commander; the commander of a merchant ship; an officer who takes rank immediately after the lieutenants, and navigates under the captain; a teacher; the head of a school or a college; an appellation of respect: an appellation given to boys; an expert or proficient; a university degree; the chief of a society. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. To conquer or subdue; to make one's self master of; to execute with skill. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. A vessel having masts. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. A man who has rule or government over others; a lord; a ruler; a chief; the head of a household; a director; an owner; a possessor; one very skilful in anything; one uncontrolled; a teacher or instructor; an employer; the commander of a merchant ship; an officer in a ship of war under the direction of the captain; a title of address to a young gentleman; title of dignity in the universities, as master of arts. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. To subdue; to conquer; to bring under control; to overcome; to excel in anything. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. A vessel having so many masts; -- used only in compounds; as, a two-master. mso.anu.edu.au
  50. A title given by courtesy, now commonly pronounced mister, except when given to boys; -- sometimes written Mister, but usually abbreviated to Mr. mso.anu.edu.au
  51. ing out of tho exigencies thereof, arbitrary i:i its character, and depending only ou the will of the commander of an army, which is established and administered in a place or district of hostile territory held in belligerent possession, or, sometimes, in places occupied or pervaded by insurgents or mobs, and which suspends all existing civil laws, as well as the civil authority and the ordinary administration of justice. See In re lizeta (IX C.) 02 Fed. 072; Diekelman v. U. S., 11 Ct. CI. 4:;!); Com. v. Shortall, 200 l'a. 105, 55 Atl. 052, 05 I- R. A. 103, !>8 Am. St. ltep. 75!); Griffin v. Wilcox, 21 Ind. 377. See, also. MILITARY LAW. "Martial law, which is built upon no settled principles, but is entirely arbitrary in its decisions, is in truth and reality no law, but something indulged rather than allowed as a law. 'i lie necessity of order and discipline iu an army is the only tiling w hich can give it countenance, and therefore it ought not to be permitted in time of peace, when the king's courts are open for all persons to receive justice according to the laws of the land." 1 ill. Comm. 413. Martial law is neither more nor less than the will of the general w ho commands the army. It overrides aud suppresses all existing civil laws, civil officers, and civil authorities, by the arbitrary exercise of military power; and every citizen or subject thelawdictionary.org
  52. A vessel having (so many) masts; used only in compounds; as, a two-master. dictgcide_fs
  53. A male person having another living being so far subject to his will, that he can, in the main, control his or its actions; formerly used with much more extensive application than now. dictgcide_fs
  54. A title given by courtesy, now commonly pronounced m, except when given to boys; sometimes written Mister, but usually abbreviated to Mr. dictgcide_fs
  55. The commander of a merchant vessel; usually called captain. Also, a commissioned officer in the navy ranking next above ensign and below lieutenant; formerly, an officer on a man-of-war who had immediate charge, under the commander, of sailing the vessel. dictgcide_fs
  56. mas't[.e]r, n. one who commands: a lord or owner: a leader or ruler: a teacher: an employer: the commander of a merchant-ship: formerly the navigator or sailing-master of a ship-of-war: one eminently skilled in anything: the common title of address to a young gentleman, &c.: a title of dignity or office--a degree conferred by universities, as Master of Arts, &c., the title of the eldest son of a Scotch viscount or baron, the head of some corporations, as Balliol College, &c., of a lodge of freemasons, &c.: a husband.--adj. the chief, predominant: belonging to a master, chief, principal, as in Master-builder, &c.--v.t. to become master of: to overcome: to become skilful in: to execute with skill.--ns. MAS'TER-BUILD'ER, a chief builder, one who directs or employs others; MAS'TERDOM, power of control.--adj. MAS'TERFUL, exercising the authority or power of a master: imperious: having the skill of a master.--adv. MAS'TERFULLY, in a masterful or imperious manner.--ns. MAS'TERFULNESS; MAS'TER-HAND, the hand of a master: a person highly skilled; MAS'TERHOOD; MAS'TER-JOINT, the most marked system of joints or divisional planes by which a rock is intersected; MAS'TERKEY, a key that opens many locks: a clue fitted to guide one out of many difficulties.--adj. MAS'TERLESS, without a master or owner: ungoverned: unsubdued: beyond control.--n. MAS'TERLINESS, quality of being masterly: masterly skill.--adj. MAS'TERLY, like a master: with the skill of a master: skilful: excellent: overbearing.--adv. with the skill of a master.--ns. MAS'TER-MAR'INER, the captain of a merchant-vessel or fishing-vessel; MAS'TER-M[=A]'SON, a freemason who has attained the third degree; MAS'TER-MIND; MAS'TER-PASS'ION; MAS'TERPIECE, a piece of work worthy of a master: a work of superior skill: chief excellence; MAS'TERSHIP, the office of master: rule or dominion: superiority; MAS'TERSTROKE, a stroke or performance worthy of a master: superior performance; MAS'TER-WHEEL, the wheel in a machine which imparts motion to other parts; MAS'TER-WORK, work worthy of a master: masterpiece; MAS'TERWORT, a perennial umbelliferous herb, native to northern Europe, its root reputed as a stomachic, sudorific, diuretic, &c.; MAS'TERY, the power or authority of a master: dominion: victory: superiority: the attainment of superior power or skill.--MASTER OF CEREMONIES, OF THE ROLLS, &c. (see CEREMONIES, ROLLS, &c.); MASTER OF THE HORSE, the Roman Magister Equitum, an official appointed by the dictator to act next under himself: an equerry, esp. the exalted official bearing this name at the British court; MASTER OF THE TEMPLE, the preacher of the Temple Church in London; MASTERS OF THE SCHOOLS, at Oxford, the conductors of the first examination (Responsions) for the degree of B.A.--MASTERLY INACTIVITY, the position or part of a neutral or a Fabian combatant, carried out with diplomatic skill, so as to preserve a predominant influence without risking anything.--PASSED, or PAST, MASTER, one who has occupied the office of master, esp. among freemasons--hence any one known to possess ample knowledge of some subject; THE LITTLE MASTERS, a 16th-17th cent. group of followers of Dürer, notable for fine work on wood and copper; THE OLD MASTERS, a term applied collectively to the great painters about the time of the Renaissance, esp. the Italians.--BE MASTER OF ONE'S SELF, to have one's passions or emotions under control. [O. Fr. maistre (Fr. maître)--L. magister, from root of magnus, great.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. Person having control; (Naut.) captain of merchant vessel; employer; owner of dog, horse, &c.; be m. of, have at one\'s disposal; make oneself m. of, acquire thorough knowledge of or facility in using; one who has or gets the upper hand, as we will see which of us is m.; teacher, tutor, esp. (also schoolm.) in school; HOUSE -m.; teacher in philosophy &c.; The M., Christ; M. of Arts (abbr. M.A.), holder of university degree orig. giving authority to teach in university; skilled workman, or one in business on his own account, as m. carpenter; great artist, esp. old m. (esp. of painters of 13th-17th cc.), picture &c. by a m.; head of some colleges; (as title of legal functionaries) M. in Chancery &c.; M. of Ceremonies (see CEREMONY), MISRULE, ROLLS; M. (organizer, leader, esp. in Royal Household& Inns of Court) of the revels; M. of the Horse, official in English royal household; M. (one who has control) of foxhounds (abbr. M.F.H.), beagles, &c.; (prefixed, esp. by servants, to name of young gentleman) M. Tom, M. Jones; (attrib.) a m. (commanding, superior) mind; m.-at-arms, police officer on man-of-war; m.-key (opening many locks, each also opened by separate key); m.-mason, (as above, also) freemason who has passed third degree; masterpiece, consummate piece of workmanship; m.-stroke, surpassingly skilful act (of policy &c.). Hence masterdom, masterhood, nn., masterless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. Overcome, defeat; reduce to subjection; acquire complete knowledge of (subject) or facility in using (instrument &c.); rule as a master. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. [A.S.] (Naut.) Of a merchantman, the captain; of a man-of-war, an officer ranking with and after lieutenants according to date, but junior in command to all lieutenants. It is his duty to navigate the vessel under the captain, but he reports to the first lieutenant, who gives the necessary orders. He is also charged with stowing stores, etc. Master and commander, former designation of a commander. See Rank. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  60. n. [Latin] A superior; one who has servants under him, or who directs or manages men or business;— owner; proprietor;— chief; principal;— director; chief manager; head;— one having exclusive right to, or uncontrolled authority over; absolute lord;— teacher; instructor;— the commander of a merchant ship;— in ships of war, an officer who navigates the ship;— one highly skilled in art, science, or accomplishments; adopts;— a director of ceremonies on public or festive occasions;— a title in the universities, as Master of Arts;— a judicial title, as Master in Chancery, &c.;— a title of respect, written Mr.;— and application given to lads or inferiors. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for master?

X