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Definitions of meander

  1. To flow in a winding course; to be intricate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To wind or flow round. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To have a winding course, as a river; wander listlessly or without purpose. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To flow or run in a winding course: to be intricate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To run in windings. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To flow circuitously. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. To wind turn, or flow round. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. To wind or flow round; to flow in a winding course or passage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. A winding, crooked, or involved course; as, the meanders of the veins and arteries. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A tortuous or intricate movement. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Fretwork. See Fret. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A winding course: a maze: perplexity. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. A winding course; a maze. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. A winding course; a winding or turning in a passage or current. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for meander?

Usage examples for meander

  1. " We went to Meander this morning thinking we'd catch father there before he left. – The Rustler of Wind River by G. W. Ogden
  2. There is also a difference between the nobles in their wealth, and the dignity in which they live: for instance, in the number of horses they breed; for this cannot be supported without a large fortune: for which reason, in former times, those cities whose strength consisted in horse became by that means oligarchies; and they used horse in their expeditions against the neighbouring cities; as the Eretrians the Chalcidians, the Magnetians, who lived near the river Meander and many others in Asia. – Politics A Treatise on Government by Aristotle
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