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Definitions of meningitis

  1. infectious disease characterized by inflammation of the meninges (the tissues that surround the brain or spinal cord) caused by a bacterial infection; symptoms include headache and stiff neck and fever and nausea Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. infectious disease characterized by inflammation of the meninges (the tissues that surround the brain or spinal cord) usually caused by a bacterial infection; symptoms include headache and stiff neck and fever and nausea Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. Inflammation of the membranes of the brain or spinal cord. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  4. Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (e.g., carcinomatous meningitis), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6) Medical Dictionary DB
  5. A disease in which the membranes inclosing the brain and the spinal cord become inflamed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. Inflammation of the membranes of the brain. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. Inflammation of the membranes, as of the brain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. Inflammation of the membranes covering the brain. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. From Meninges, and itis, detonating inflammation. Inflammation of the meninges or membranes of the brain. See Phrenitis. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  10. [Greek] Inflammation of the envelopes of the brain (Cerebral m.), the spinal cord (Spinal m.), or both (Cerebro-spinal m.). M may affect the dura mater (pachymeningitis, q.v.)or the arachnoid and pia mater (lepto-meningitis or simply M.). M. is classed, according to the character of the inflammation, as Simple, in which the exudate consists chiefly of serum (Serous m.)or of fibrin and serum, and Purulent, in which the exudate consists largely of pus; and, according to the site of the lesion, as M. of the vertex and M. of the base (Basilar m.) of the brain, the former occurring especially in ordinary acute m., the latter in tuberculous and syphilitic m. Acute (cerebral) m. is due to traumatism (Traumatic m.), the extension of inflammation from adjacent organs, as the ear (Otitic m.), eye, or brain, the transmission of infection from remote parts in general diseases, as the exanthemata, septicaemia, etc. (Septicaemic m., Metastatic m.), to the presence of tubercles (Tuberculous m., Acute hydrocephalus), or to the action of a specific virus (Epidemic cerebro-spinal m.). The bacteria most frequently causing m. are Micrococcus lanceolatus, Micrococcus intracellularis (in cerebro-spinal m.), Bacillus meningitidis, Bacillus meningitidis aerogenes, Bacillus coli, and Bacillus chlologenus. Symptoms: chills, fever (with comparatively slow pulse), severe headache, delirium, vomiting, photophobia and intolerance of sounds, and signs of compression or irritation of the nerves at the base or vertex of the skull (optic neuritis, strabismus, inequality of the pupils, ptosis, facial paresis, rigidity of the limbs, rigidity of the muscles at the back of the neck, producing retraction of the head, and convulsions). In epidemic cerebro-spinal m., there is often an eruption of erythema, herpes, or haemorrhagic spots upon the skin. Chronic (cerebral) m. is due usually to alcoholism (Alcoholic m.), in which the symptoms are chiefly headache and slow mental degeneration; and to syphilis, in which case headache and pressure symptoms (paralysis of any of the nerves, convulsions, etc.) occur. Acute spinal m., produced by exposure to cold and by the causes producing cerebral m., is marked by fever, pain in the back and radiating along the peripheral nerves, hyperaesthesia, rigidity, and spasm, succeeded in the later stages by anaesthesia and paralysis of the muscles of the back and limbs; dyspnoea from spasm of the thoracic muscles; retention of urine. Chronic spinal m., due to continued exposure to cold, to syphilis, sexual excess, over-exertion, alcoholism, etc., is marked by pains in the back and radiating along the nerves and by cutaneous hyperaesthesia, succeeded by paralysis and atrophy of the muscles. TREATMENT OF M.: removal of exciting cause; quiet and rest in a dark room, with bromides and opiates as sedatives; the application of cold, dry cupping, and counter-irritants; ergot in acute cases mercury and potassium iodide, especially in chronic m. na
  11. Inflammation of the meninges. American pocket medical dictionary.
  12. Inflammation of the cerebral or spinal meninges, usually involving the subjacent tissues of the brain or spinal cord. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  13. [Gr.] (Med.) Inflammation of the membranes of the brain. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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