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Definitions of metal

  1. To cover with metal; as, to metal a ship's bottom; to metal a road. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To cover with metal, such as gold, silver, copper, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. cover with metal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. To cover with metal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. Mils. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  6. any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc. Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. An elementary substance, as sodium, calcium, or copper, whose oxide or hydroxide has basic rather than acid properties, as contrasted with the nonmetals, or metalloids. No sharp line can be drawn between the metals and nonmetals, and certain elements partake of both acid and basic qualities, as chromium, manganese, bismuth, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A mine from which ores are taken. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Courage; spirit; mettle. See Mettle. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The broken stone used in macadamizing roads and ballasting railroads. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The effective power or caliber of guns carried by a vessel of war. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Glass in a state of fusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The rails of a railroad. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Ore from which a metal is derived; - so called by miners. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A heavy, lustrous substance, capable of being drawn into a fine thread and beaten or hammered into thin plates, of being melted by heat, and of carrying electricity; material; substance; hence, spirit; temper. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. A solid, shining, opaque body, such as gold, etc.: broken stone used for macadamized roads. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. A simple, fixed, opaque body, fusible by heat. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. Metallic. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. An elementary substance, usually hard, heavy, and malleable, as iron, gold, tin, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. An opaque body or substance, insoluble in water, fusible by heat, a good conductor of heat and electricity, and having a peculiar lustre known as the metallic lustre; glass in a state of fusion; stones broken small for roads; the effective power of guns borne by a vessel of war. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. A well-known body, such as gold, silver, copper, iron, &c.; broken stones used for roads; broken glass for the melting-pot. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. See mettle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for metal

  1. He tried to ask them from whence the metal came, but he could not make them understand. – The Return of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  2. With the mounting strain Christopher began to prove of what metal he was made. – Christopher Hibbault, Roadmaker by Marguerite Bryant
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