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Definitions of metal

  1. a mixture containing two or more metallic elements or metallic and nonmetallic elements usually fused together or dissolving into each other when molten; "brass is an alloy of zinc and copper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. cover with metal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. containing or made of or resembling or characteristic of a metal; "a metallic compound"; "metallic luster"; "the strange metallic note of the meadow lark, suggesting the clash of vibrant blades"- Ambrose Bierce Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc. Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. An elementary substance, as sodium, calcium, or copper, whose oxide or hydroxide has basic rather than acid properties, as contrasted with the nonmetals, or metalloids. No sharp line can be drawn between the metals and nonmetals, and certain elements partake of both acid and basic qualities, as chromium, manganese, bismuth, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A mine from which ores are taken. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The substance of which anything is made; material; hence, constitutional disposition; character; temper. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Courage; spirit; mettle. See Mettle. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The broken stone used in macadamizing roads and ballasting railroads. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The effective power or caliber of guns carried by a vessel of war. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Glass in a state of fusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The rails of a railroad. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To cover with metal; as, to metal a ship's bottom; to metal a road. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Ore from which a metal is derived; - so called by miners. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A heavy, lustrous substance, capable of being drawn into a fine thread and beaten or hammered into thin plates, of being melted by heat, and of carrying electricity; material; substance; hence, spirit; temper. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To cover with metal, such as gold, silver, copper, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Hard, heavy, fusible substance, as iron. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  18. A solid, shining, opaque body, such as gold, etc.: broken stone used for macadamized roads. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. A simple, fixed, opaque body, fusible by heat. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. Metallic. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. An elementary substance, usually hard, heavy, and malleable, as iron, gold, tin, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Mils. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. An opaque body or substance, insoluble in water, fusible by heat, a good conductor of heat and electricity, and having a peculiar lustre known as the metallic lustre; glass in a state of fusion; stones broken small for roads; the effective power of guns borne by a vessel of war. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To cover with metal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. A well-known body, such as gold, silver, copper, iron, &c.; broken stones used for roads; broken glass for the melting-pot. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. See mettle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. Ore from which a metal is derived; -- so called by miners. mso.anu.edu.au
  28. Chemical element characterized (1) as a good heat and electricity conductor, (2) as opaque but when polished reflects light very well, (3) as malleable, (4) as processable into wires, (5) as sonorous when struck. Cobalt, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and zinc are metals essential to animal, human, and plant health, in trace quantities. Under suitable conditions all metals crystallize. All metals are solid at normal temperature except cesium, gallium, and mercury. Metals tend to form positive ions, being electropositive chemically, and most have strong reactive-affinity with certain non-metallic elements to forms salts, as with chlorine and sulfur. thelawdictionary.org
  29. Ore from which a metal is derived; so called by miners. dictgcide_fs
  30. met'al, n. an opaque substance, possessing a peculiar lustre, fusibility, conductivity for heat and electricity, &c., such as gold, &c.: courage or spirit (now spelt mettle): intrinsic quality: the number and power of guns carried by a ship-of-war: broken stones used for macadamised roads: (pl.) the rails of a railroad.--v.t. to put metal on, as a road.--n. METALIC'ITY.--adjs. MET'ALLED, covered with metal, as a road; METAL'LIC, pertaining to, or like, a metal: consisting of metal.--adv. METAL'LICALLY.--adjs. METALLIF'EROUS, producing or yielding metals; METAL'LIFORM, having the form of metals: like metal; MET'ALLINE, pertaining to a metal: consisting of, or mixed with, metal.--ns. MET'ALLING, road-metal, broken stones; METALLIS[=A]'TION.--v.t. MET'ALLISE, to form into metal: to give to a substance its metallic properties.--ns. MET'ALLIST, a worker in metals: one who is skilled in metals: an advocate of the use of metal as currency; METAL'LOGRAPH, a print produced by metallographic process.--adj. METALLOGRAPH'IC--ns. METALLOG'RAPHIST; METALLOG'RAPHY, an account or description of metals: a process for utilising metal plates in a manner similar to lithographic stones: a process of imitating the grain of wood on metals; MET'ALLOID, one of the metallic bases of the fixed alkalies and alkaline earths: any of the elements which are non-metallic in the chemical sense of being able to replace hydrogen in an acid, and thus forming a salt: one of the inflammable non-metallic elements (sulphur, phosphorus, &c.).--adjs. MET'ALLOID, METALLOID'AL, pertaining to, or of the nature of, the metalloids.--ns. METAL'LOPHONE, a kind of piano, having graduated metal bars in place of strings: a musical instrument, differing from the xylophone in having metal instead of wooden bars; MET'ALLOTHERAPY, the treatment of disease by the external application of metals.--METALLIC OXIDE, a compound of metal and oxygen; METALLIC SALTS, salts having a metal or metallic oxide for base.--BASE METALS, lead, zinc, copper, iron; FUSIBLE METAL, a metallic alloy that fuses at a very low temperature--usually of lead, tin, and bismuth; LIGHT METALS, those whose specific gravity is less than 5; NOBLE, or PERFECT, METALS, gold, silver, platinum, so called because they keep their lustre when exposed to the air. [Fr.,--L. metallum--Gr. metallon, a mine, a metal.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. A class of simple, combustible bodies; distinguished from others by considerable specific gravity; a particular splendour; amost total opacity; insolubility in water; and the property they have of ringing when struck. Metals have no effect, except of a mechanical nature, when taken into the stomach; unless they have already undergone, or undergo in the stomach, oxidation or union with an acid; when, at times, deleterious compounds may be formed. Copper cents; half-pence; quicksilver; lead, have frequently been swallowed in the metallic state with impunity. Tin and mercury are the only metals prescribed for a mechanical effect; the former as an anthelmintic, - the latter, idly enough, in cases of fancied intussusception. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  32. [Greek] An element, such as iron, lead, or gold, distinguished by its susceptibility of polish and its malleability, ductility, and power of conducting heat and electricity. The m’s are usually held to include all the elements except oxygen, chlorine, bromine, iodine, fluorine, sulphur, phosphorus, nitrogen, carbon, silicon, boron, selenium, and hydrogen. Hydrogen, however, is often group among the m’s on account of its chemical properties; and some or all of the following m’s are by many, for the same reason, classed as non-metallic, and, from their ambiguous character, are called Metalloids; vanadium, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, tellurium, tungsten, molybdenum, tin, titanium, thorium, zirconium, niobium, uranium, and tantalum. M’s are usually distinguished by forming basic compounds with oxygen. The Light m’s comprise the Alkaline m’s (sodium, potassium, lithium, caesium, rubidium), the M’s of the alkaline earths (calcium, barium, magnesium, strontium), and other m’s such as aluminum. The Heavy m’s include gold, silver, lead, mercury, platinum, etc. Base m., one which readily tarnishes, especially on exposure to moisture, as distinguished from the Noble m’s (gold, silver, platinum, iridium, osmium, palladium, etc.), which are not readily affected by exposure. na
  33. (-II-). Any of a class of substances represented by gold, silver, copper, iron, lead, & tin, but containing many substances that have few of the characteristics of these; BELL, BRITANNIA, GUN, WHITE, YELLOW, m.; HEAVY m.; material used for making glass, in molten state; (also road m.) broken stone for macadam roads or railway ballast; (v.t.) furnish, fit, with m., mend (road) with m. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. Any element marked by luster, malleability, ductility, and conductivity of electricity and heat. American pocket medical dictionary.
  35. [L.] In organ pipes, means spotted Metal. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  36. [L.] In road-making, stone. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  37. [L.] In the artillery, gun-metal. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  38. See Spotted metal. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  39. n. [Latin] A substance having a peculiar lustre, insoluble in water, a good conduce of heat and electricity, and usually solid at ordinary temperatures;— the effective power or calibre of guns carried by a vessel of war;— the materials of which glass, pottery, type, &c. are made;— small or broken stone used in macadamiaing roads. Cabinet Dictionary

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