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Definitions of middle

  1. equally distant from the extremes Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. an area that is approximately central within some larger region; "it is in the center of town"; "they ran forward into the heart of the struggle"; "they were in the eye of the storm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. being neither at the beginning nor at the end in a series; "adolescence is an awkward in-between age"; "in a mediate position"; "the middle point on a line" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. put in the middle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an intermediate part or section; "A whole is that which has beginning, middle, and end"- Aristotle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. time between the beginning and the end of a temporal period; "the middle of the war"; "rain during the middle of April" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. between an earlier and a later period of time; "in the middle years"; "in his middle thirties" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (linguistics) of a stage in the development of a language or literature between earlier and later stages; "Middle English is the English language from about 1100 to 1500"; "Middle Gaelic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the middle area of the human torso (usually in front); "young American women believe that a bare midriff is fashionable" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. of a stage in the development of a language or literature between earlier and later stages; "Middle English is the English language from about 1100 to 1500"; "Middle Gaelic" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. Equally distant from the extreme either of a number of things or of one thing; mean; medial; as, the middle house in a row; a middle rank or station in life; flowers of middle summer; men of middle age. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Intermediate; intervening. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The point or part equally distant from the extremities or exterior limits, as of a line, a surface, or a solid; an intervening point or part in space, time, or order of series; the midst; central portion Webster Dictionary DB
  14. the waist. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The point equally distant from two given points or extremes; central part. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Equally distant from the extremes; halfway between two given points; mean; medial. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Equally distant from the extremes: intermediate: intervening. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. The middle point or part: midst: central portion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. Equally distant from the extremes; intermediate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. The middle point or part. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. Equally distant from the extremes; mean; intermediate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. The part equally distant from the extremities; something intermediate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Equally distant from the extremes; intermediate. Middle Ages, the period which intervened between the fall of the Roman Empire and the revival of letters in the fifteenth century. Middle term, that term in the premises with which those of the conclus; on are successively compared. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. The point or part equally distant from the extremities; the midst; centre. Middle-aged, being about the middle of the ordinary age of man. Middle-class, the class between the aristocracy and the labouring class. Middle-deck, the deck below the main deck in three-deckers. Middle-man, an agent between two parties, chiefly connected with the letting of land. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. Equally distant from the extremes; intervening. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. The point or part equally distant from the extremities; the time which passes, or the events which happen, between the beginning and the end. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. mid'l, adj. equally distant from the extremes: intermediate: intervening: (gram.) intermediate between active and passive, reflexive.--n. the middle point or part: midst: central portion, waist.--adjs. MIDD'LE-AGED, of or about the middle period of life (from about 35 to 50); MIDD'LE-CLASS, pertaining to, or included in, the middle class.--ns. MIDD'LE-EARTH (Shak.), the earth, considered as placed between the upper and lower regions; MIDD'LEMAN, one who stands in the middle between two persons: an agent who does business between two parties: in Ireland, one who rents land in large tracts, and lets it in small portions to the peasantry.--adjs. MIDD'LEMOST, MID'MOST (B.), nearest the middle; MIDD'LE-SIZED, of middle or average size.--ns. MIDD'LE-WATCH, the period between midnight and 4 A.M.; MIDD'LE-WEIGHT, a boxer or jockey of intermediate weight, between light and heavy weight.--adj. MIDD'LING, of middle rate, state, size, or quality: about equally distant from the extremes: moderate: (Scot.) not in very good health: fairly well or prosperous.--adv. moderately.--n. MIDD'LINGNESS, mediocrity.--n.pl. MIDD'LINGS, the coarser part of ground wheat.--MIDDLE AGES, the time between the downfall of the western Roman empire, about 476 A.D., and the Reformation in the first quarter of the 16th century, or even earlier--in the later half of the preceding century, when printing was invented, America discovered, and the revival of learning took place; MIDDLE CLASS, that part of the people which comes between the nobility and the working-class; MIDDLE DISTANCE (same as MIDDLE GROUND); MIDDLE ENGLISH, English as spoken and written from 1350 to 1500 or 1550; MIDDLE GROUND, the central portion of a picture--that is, between the foreground and background; MIDDLE KINGDOM, China; MIDDLE PASSAGE, the voyage across the Atlantic from Africa to the West Indies, which was a time of horror on board a slave-ship; MIDDLE STATES, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware; MIDDLE TERM (logic), that term of a syllogism which appears both in the major premise and the minor, but not in the conclusion.--MIDDLE-CLASS SCHOOLS, schools for the higher education of the middle class, intermediate between the primary schools and the large public schools or the universities. [A.S. middel--mid; Dut. middel, Ger. mittel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. (not pred.; rare sup. middlemost) & n. (Of member of group) so placed as to have same number of members on each side; equidistant from extremities; intermediate in rank, quality, &c.; m. course, way, compromise between two extremes; (Gram.) intermediate voice of Greek vbs, between active& passive, expressing reflexive action or intransitive conditions; M. ENGLISH; m. age, between youth& old age; m.-aged, of such age; the M. Ages (about 1000-1400); m. class, class of society between upper& lower (often attrib., m. class); m. (second) finger; in the m. of, while (doing), during (process); (Log.) m. (term), term common to both premisses, principle of excluded m. (that anything must be included either under a given term or under its negative); middleman, any of the traders through whose hands commodity passes from producer to consumer; (n.) m. point or part (of), waist. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  29. (Footb.) return (ball or abs.) from wing to mid-field in front of goal; (techn.) place in the middle; (Naut.) fold in the middle. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. m. article, brief essay of literary kind published in weekly or other journal& often placed between the political articles& the book-reviews; the M. Kingdom, China (f. Chin. phr. orig. applied to Honan as central& sovereign State); m. life, the m. part of life, m. age; the m. of next week (knock or send one into t. m. o. n. w., knock him senseless, esp. as vague threat). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. n. The point or part equally distant from the extremities ; midst; centre; waist. Cabinet Dictionary

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