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Definitions of mirror

  1. reflect as if in a mirror; "The smallest pond at night mirrors the firmament above" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. polished surface that forms images by reflecting light Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a faithful depiction or reflection; "the best mirror is an old friend" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. reflect or resemble; "The plane crash in Milan mirrored the attack in the World Trade Center" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. A looking-glass or a speculum; any glass or polished substance that forms images by the reflection of rays of light. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. That which gives a true representation, or in which a true image may be seen; hence, a pattern; an exemplar. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To reflect, as in a mirror. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. A looking-glass; any substance that reflects images; that which gives a true likeness; hence, a pattern. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. A polished surface reflecting the rays of light from objects in front of it. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  10. A looking-glass: any polished substance in which objects may be seen: a pattern. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To reflect as in a mirror:-pr.p. mirroring; pa.p. mirrored. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. A looking-glass. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. To reflect, as a mirror. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. To image. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. An object having a reflecting surface. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. A looking-glass or speculum; a pattern; an exemplar. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. Any polished body capable of reflecting images of objects; a looking-glass; a pattern or example, as, "she was a mirror of grace". Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. To reflect or shadow forth as in a mirror. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. ( Exodus 38:8 ; Job 37:18 ) The Hebrew women on coming out of Egypt probably brought with them mirrors like those which were used by the Egyptians, and were made of a mixed metal, chiefly copper, wrought with admirable skill, and susceptible of a bright lustre. ( 1 Chronicles 13:12 ) biblestudytools.com
  20. The Mirror of Justice, or of the Justices, commonly spoken of as the "Mirror," is an ancient treatise on the laws of England, written during the reign of Ed- ward II., and attributed to one Andrew Ilorne. thelawdictionary.org
  21. To copy or duplicate; to mimic or imitate; as, the files at Project Gutenberg were mirrored on several other ftp sites around the world. dictgcide_fs
  22. To have a close resemblance to; as, his opinions often mirrored those of his wife. dictgcide_fs
  23. mir'ur, n. a looking-glass: a reflecting surface, usually made of glass lined at the back with a brilliant metal: a pattern.--v.t. to reflect as in a mirror:--pr.p. mirr'oring; pa.p. mirr'ored.--n. MAG'IC-MIRR'OR, a mirror in which, by means of divination, a person sees scenes in his future life: a Japanese convex mirror, engraved on the back, by which bright light reflected from the polished surface on to a screen gives bright-lined images corresponding to the figures on the back. [O. Fr. mireor, miroir--L. mir[=a]ri, -[=a]tus, to wonder at.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. [Latin] A smooth reflecting surface for throwing light in any desired direction or for forming an image of an object The surface may be plane (Plane m.) or curved (Curved m.); in the latter case the m. being either Convex or Concave. Curved m’s are usually made from the surface of a sphere (Spherical mirror) sometimes from that of paraboloid. (Parabolic m.). Plane m’s neither disperse nor concentrate light, and are used for affording weak illumination and for the formation of images which are of the same size as the object, erect, and virtual. Convex mirrors disperse light so that the latter appears to radiated from a point behind the m. (virtual focus), and they produce images which are smaller than the object smaller than the object, and are erected and virtual. Concave m’s collect light and heat into a pint in front of the m. (real focus), and are hence used for concentrating heat (Burning m.), and for concentrating light and thus illuminating an object strongly. They form an enlarged erect and virtual image or a small or large inverted real image, according to the distance of the objects from the m. M’s are used for giving a view of the cavities of the body (Throat-m., Laryngoscopic m. Rhinoscope m.), and are usually either held in the hand or attached to the forehead (Forehead-m., Head-m.). na
  25. Polished usu. glass surface reflecting image, looking-glass; (fig.) what gives faithful reflection or true description of thing; (v. t.) reflect as in m. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  26. n. [French, Latin] A looking-glass; -that in which a true image may be seen; a pattern; an exemplar. Cabinet Dictionary

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