Spellcheck.net

Definitions of monarch

  1. One superior to all others of the same kind; as, an oak is called the monarch of the forest. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. A patron deity or presiding genius. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. A very large red and black butterfly (Danais Plexippus); - called also milkweed butterfly. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. A supreme ruler; sovereign. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. Supreme ruler; king; sovereign. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. A sovereign, as a king or emperor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. The sole ruler or sovereign of a people, whether king, queen, or emperor; the chief of its class. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. The prince or ruler of a country; a king; a sovereign; a person or thing superior to others of the same kind. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. Superior to others; preeminent; supreme; ruling. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Supreme. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Monarchal, monarchic. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Supreme: superior to others. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Monarchal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. Supreme; ruling. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. With only one protoxylem. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

What are the misspellings for monarch?

Usage examples for monarch

  1. Peter even carried his insolence so far as to declare publicly, that the barons of England must not pretend to put themselves on the same footing with those of France; or assume the same liberties and privileges: the monarch in the former country had a more absolute power than in the latter. – The History of England, Volume I by David Hume
  2. The " Monarch near by, is much larger, but not at all pretty. – The Lure of the Camera by Charles S. Olcott
X