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Definitions of month

  1. one of the twelve divisions of the calendar year; "he paid the bill last month" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a time unit of 30 days; "he was given a month to pay the bill" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. One of the twelve portions into which the year is divided; the twelfth part of a year, corresponding nearly to the length of a synodic revolution of the moon, - whence the name. In popular use, a period of four weeks is often called a month. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. One of the twelve parts into which the year is divided, each containing about four weeks. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. The period of one revolution of the moon (now distinguished as a "lunar" month); one of the twelve parts of the year (a "calendar" month). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. Revolution of the moon; one of the twelve parts of the year. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. One of the 12 parts into which the year is divided. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. The time of the revolution of the moon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. A period of time comprehending one-twelfth of the year, called the calender month; the period of one revolution of the moon, called a lunar month. See Moon. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. The twelfth part of the year; in popular usage, four weeks. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. From the time of the institution of the Mosaic law downward the religious feasts commencing with the passover depended not simply on the month, but on the moon; the 14th of Abib was coincident with the full moon; and the new moons themselves were the occasions of regular festivals. ( Numbers 10:10 ; 28:11-14 ) The commencement of the month was generally decided by observation of the new moon. The usual number of months in a year was twelve, as implied in ( 1 Kings 4:7 ; 1 Chronicles 27:1-15 ) but since twelve lunar months would make but 354 1/2 days, the years would be short twelve days of the short twelve days of the true year, and therefore it follows as a matter of course that an additional month must have been inserted about every third year, which would bring the number up to thirteen. No notice, however, is taken of this month in the Bible. In the modern Jewish calendar the intercalary month is introduced seven times in every nineteen years. The usual method of designating the months was by their numerical order, e.g. "the second month," ( Genesis 7:11 ) "the fourth month," ( 2 Kings 25:3 ) and this was generally retained even when the names were given, e.g. "in the month Zif, which is the second month." ( 1 Kings 6:1 ) The names of the months belong to two distinct periods. In the first place we have those peculiar to the period of Jewish independence, of which four only, even including Abib, which we hardly regard as a proper name are mentioned, viz.: Abib, in which the passover fell, ( Exodus 13:4 ; 23:15 ; 34:18 ; 16:1 ) and which was established as the first month in commemoration of the exodus, ( Exodus 12:2 ) Zif, the second month, ( 1 Kings 6:1 1 Kings 6:37 ) Bul, the eighth, ( 1 Kings 6:38 ) and Ethanim, the seventh. ( 1 Kings 6:38 ) and Ethanim, the seventh. ( 1 Kings 8:2 ) In the second place we have the names which prevailed subsequent to the Babylonish captivity; of these the following seven appear in the Bible: Nisan, the first, in which the passover was held, ( Nehemiah 2:1 ; Esther 3:7 ) Sivan, the third ( Esther 8:9 ) Bar. 1:8; Elul, the sixth, ( Nehemiah 6:15 ) 1 Macc. 14:27; Chisleu, the ninth, ( Nehemiah 1:1 ; Zechariah 7:1 ) 1 Macc. 1:54; Tebeth, the tenth, ( Esther 2:16 ) Sebat, the eleventh, ( Zechariah 1:7 ) 1 Macc. 16:14; and Adar, the twelfth. ( Esther 3:7 ; 8:1 ) 2 Macc. 15:36. The names of the remaining five occur int he Talmud and other works; they were, Iyar, the second, Targum; ( 2 Chronicles 30:2 ) Tammuz, the fourth; Ab, the fifth; Tisri, the seventh; and Marcheshvan, the eighth. The name of the intercalary month was Ve-adar, i.e. the additional Adar. The identification of the jewish months with our own cannot be effected with precision on account of the variations that must inevitably exist between the lunar and the solar month. Nisan (or Abib) answers to March; Zif or Iyar to May; Sivan to June; Tammuz to July; Ab to August; Elul to September; Ethanim or Tisri to October; Bul or Marcheshvan to November; Chisleu to December; Tebeth to January; Sebat to February; and Adar to March. biblestudytools.com
  12. One of the twelve portions into which the year is divided; the twelfth part of a year, corresponding nearly to the length of a synodic revolution of the moon, -- whence the name. In popular use, a period of four weeks is often called a month. mso.anu.edu.au
  13. Among the Egyptians the month of thirty days each was in use long before the time of the Exodus, and formed the basis of their calculations. From the time of the institution of the Mosaic law the month among the Jews was lunar. The cycle of religious feasts depended on the moon. The commencement of a month was determined by the observation of the new moon. The number of months in the year was usually twelve ( 1 Kings 4:7 ; 1 Chronicles 27:1-15 ); but every third year an additional month (ve-Adar) was inserted, so as to make the months coincide with the seasons. "The Hebrews and Phoenicians had no word for month save 'moon,' and only saved their calendar from becoming vague like that of the Moslems by the interpolation of an additional month. There is no evidence at all that they ever used a true solar year such as the Egyptians possessed. The latter had twelve months of thirty days and five epagomenac or odd days.", Palestine Quarterly, January 1889. biblestudytools.com
  14. One of the divisions of a year. The space of time denoted by this term varies according as one or another of the following varieties of months is intended: Astronomical, containing one-twelfth of the time occupied by the suu in passing through the entire zodiac. Calender, civil, or solar, which is one of the months in the Gregorian calendar, thelawdictionary.org
  15. One of the twelve portions into which the year is divided; the twelfth part of a year, corresponding nearly to the length of a synodic revolution of the moon, whence the name. In popular use, a period of four weeks is often called a month. dictgcide_fs
  16. munth, n. the period from new moon to new moon--a lunation, lunar, or synodic month (=29.5306 days): one of the twelve divisions of the year--a calendar month: one-twelfth part of a tropical year, the time the sun takes to pass through 30°--a solar month=30.4368 days.--n. MONTH'LING, that which is a month old or which lasts a month.--adj. MONTH'LY, performed in a month: happening or published once a month.--n. a monthly publication: (pl.) the menses.--adv. once a month: in every month.--MONTH OF SUNDAYS, a period that seems very long; MONTH'S MIND (see MIND).--SIDEREAL, OR STELLAR, MONTH, the time in which the moon passes round the ecliptic to the same star=27.3217 days; TROPICAL, or PERIODIC, MONTH, from the moon's passing the equinox till she again reaches it=27.3216 days. [A.S. mónð--móna, the moon.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. Any of the twelve portions into which the year is divided (also calendar m.); lunar m., period in which moon makes complete revolution; space of time from a day in one month to corresponding day in next; space of 28 days; m. of Sundays, indefinite period; this day m., a month from to-day; m.\'s mind, mass &c. in commemoration of deceased person a month after death, (also) inclination, liking. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. [L., Gr.] Calendar months are merely artificial parts of the calendar year, January, February, etc. The mean of the intervals from one new moon (i.e. from one conjunction) to the next is the Synodic or Lunar Month; its length is 29 days 12 hrs. 44 mins. 2.8 secs. The Tropical Month is the mean interval between her leaving and returning to the first point of Aries; its length is 27 days 7 hrs. 43 mins. 4.5 secs. The Sidereal Month is the mean interval between her leaving and returning to a given point in the heavens, i.e. it is the tropical month corrected for precession; its length is about seven seconds longer than the tropical month. A Full Month is one of thirty days; a Hollow Month, one of twenty-nine days. These terms were used in the distribution of the months throughout the Metonic cycle. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  19. n. [Anglo-Saxon] One of the twelve portions into which the year is divided. Cabinet Dictionary

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