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Definitions of moor

  1. come into or dock at a wharf; "the big ship wharfed in the evening" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. secure in or as if in a berth or dock; "tie up the boat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. open land usually with peaty soil covered with heather and bracken and moss Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. one of the Muslim people of Africa; of mixed Arab and Berber descent; converted to Islam in the 8th century; conquerors of Spain in the 8th century Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. secure with cables or ropes; "moor the boat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. one of the Muslim people of north Africa; of mixed Arab and Berber descent; converted to Islam in the 8th century; conqueror of Spain in the 8th century Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. One of a mixed race inhabiting Morocco, Algeria, Tunis, and Tripoli, chiefly along the coast and in towns. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Any individual of the swarthy races of Africa or Asia which have adopted the Mohammedan religion. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. An extensive waste covered with patches of heath, and having a poor, light soil, but sometimes marshy, and abounding in peat; a heath. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A game preserve consisting of moorland. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To fix or secure, as a vessel, in a particular place by casting anchor, or by fastening with cables or chains; as, the vessel was moored in the stream; they moored the boat to the wharf. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Fig.: To secure, or fix firmly. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To cast anchor; to become fast. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. In England, a broad tract of waste land covered with heather, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To fasten (a ship) by a cable and anchor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To be secured by a cable and anchor.—Moor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. A native of Morocco, in North Africa; in the Middle Ages, one of the Saracens who invaded and settled in Spain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Moorish, Moorish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. An extensive waste covered with heath, and having a poor, peaty soil: a heath. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To fasten a ship by cable and anchor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To be fastened by cables or chains. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A native of N. Africa, of a dark complexion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To fasten by a cable, as a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. Waste land covered with heath; a native of North Africa. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To fasten, as a vessel, to the shore or bottom; tie up; anchor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A tract of waste land, or a tract kept for hunting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. One of the mixed race inhabiting Morocco and the adjacent coast. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. An extensive barren waste, covered with heath, and sometimes marshy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. A native of the northern coast of Africa, of dark complexion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To secure, as a ship, with cable and anchor. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To be confined by cables. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. An extensive tract of waste land, covered with patches of heath, and having a poor light soil, sometimes marshy and peaty. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. A native of the northern part of Africa-called by the anc. Romans, Mauritania, form the colour of the people, the word meaning literally "dark-compleioned people"; one of the people from Africa who conquered Spain in the eight century-these were, however. strictly Arabs, teh Moors crossing much later. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. To confine or make fast a ship, by means of cables or chains and anchors, in a particular station; to be confined to a particular station, a ship. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. An officer in the Isle of Man, who summons the courts for the several sheadings. The office is similar to the English bailiff of a hundred. thelawdictionary.org
  36. Any individual of the swarthy races of Africa or Asia which have adopted the Muslim religion. dictgcide_fs
  37. m[=oo]r, n. a large tract of untilled ground, often covered with heath, and having a poor, peaty soil: a heath.--ns. MOOR'COCK, MOOR'FOWL, the red grouse or heathcock found in moors; MOOR'HEN, the female moor-fowl: the water-hen; MOOR'-ILL (Scot.), a kind of disease among cattle--also Red-water.--adjs. MOOR'ISH, MOOR'Y, resembling a moor: sterile: marshy: boggy.--n. MOOR'LAND, a tract of moor. [A.S. mór; Ice. mór, peat.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. m[=oo]r, v.t. to fasten a ship by cable and anchor: to fix firmly.--v.i. to be fastened by cables or chains.--ns. MOOR'AGE, a place for mooring; MOOR'ING, act of mooring: that which serves to moor or confine a ship: in pl. the place or condition of a ship thus moored. [Prob. Dut. marren, to tie, allied to A.S. merran (in compound ámierran), Old High Ger. marrjan, to hinder.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. m[=oo]r, n. a member of the dark mixed Mauretanian and Arab race inhabiting Morocco and the Barbary coast: one of the Arab and Berber conquerors and occupants of Spain from 711 to 1492--same as Arab or Saracen: a dark-coloured person generally, a negro.--n. MOOR'ERY, a quarter inhabited by MOORS.--adj. MOOR'ISH. [Fr. more, maure--L. maurus--Gr. mauros, black.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. Tract of open waste ground, esp. if covered with heather; (in Cornwall) waste land where tin is found; m. game, red (rarely, black) grouse; m.-cock, male of this; m.-hen, female of this, (also) water-hen; moorland, country abounding in heather; moorstone, kind of granite. Hence moorish, moory, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. One of a Mohammedan race, mixed Berber& Arab, inhabiting N. W. Africa. Hence Moorish a. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. Secure (boat or other floating thing) with chains or ropes fastened to shore or to anchors. Hence moorage (3,4) n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. n. [Anglo-Saxon] An extensive waste covered with heath, and having a poor, light soil, but sometimes marshy, and abounding in peat; a heath; a fen. Cabinet Dictionary
  44. n. [Latin, Greek] A native of the northern coast of Africa. Cabinet Dictionary

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