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Definitions of mould

  1. To become, or cause to become, moldy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To cover with mold or soil. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To cause to become moldy; to cause mold to grow upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To form into a particular shape; to shape; to model; to fashion. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To ornament by molding or carving the material of; as, a molded window jamb. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To knead; as, to mold dough or bread. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To cover with a damp growth; to fashion or form into a particular shape. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To cover with mould or soil: to cause to become mouldy. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. To form in a mould: to knead, as dough. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To form in a mold. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. To cover with mold. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. To become moldy; to be covered or filled, in whole or in part, with a mold. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To become covered with a tiny growth caused by dampness. Also, mold. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To become mouldy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. make something, usually for a specific function; "She molded the riceballs carefully"; "Form cylinders from the dough"; "shape a figure"; "Work the metal into a sword" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. form in clay, wax, etc; "model a head with clay" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. Crumbling, soft, friable earth; esp., earth containing the remains or constituents of organic matter, and suited to the growth of plants; soil. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Earthy material; the matter of which anything is formed; composing substance; material. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. See MOLD, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. To cause to contract mould; to cover with mould. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. To form into a particular shape; to shape; to fashion; to model; to knead. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. To cause to contract mould; to become mouldy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23. To form into a particular shape; to fashion; to knead. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  24. Alt. of Mouldy Webster Dictionary DB
  25. a fungus that produces a superficial growth on various kinds of damp or decaying organic matter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. loose soil rich in organic matter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. A growth of minute fungi of various kinds, esp. those of the great groups Hyphomycetes, and Physomycetes, forming on damp or decaying organic matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The matrix, or cavity, in which anything is shaped, and from which it takes its form; also, the body or mass containing the cavity; as, a sand mold; a jelly mold. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. That on which, or in accordance with which, anything is modeled or formed; anything which serves to regulate the size, form, etc., as the pattern or templet used by a shipbuilder, carpenter, or mason. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Cast; form; shape; character. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A group of moldings; as, the arch mold of a porch or doorway; the pier mold of a Gothic pier, meaning the whole profile, section, or combination of parts. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A frame with a wire cloth bottom, on which the pump is drained to form a sheet, in making paper by hand. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A fine, soft, rich soil; a discoloration or growth caused by dampness; a cavity or vessel in which anything is shaped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. Dust: soil rich in decayed matter: the matter of which anything is composed: a minute fungus which grows on bodies in a damp atmosphere, so named from often growing on mould. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. A hollow form in which anything is cast: a pattern: the form received from a mould: character. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. MOULDER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. A form for shaping anything plastic; a model character. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Rich earth; constituent material. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Any fungous growth on food, clothing, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Fine soft earth, or earth easily pulverized, such as constitutes soil, and is rich in decayed vegetable or animal matter; substance of which anything is composed; a minute vegetable growth on decaying vegetable or animal matter. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. The matrix in which anything is cast and receives its form; pattern; cast; form; stamp. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. Fine soft earth such as constitutes soil; friable earth; garden-soil; matter of which anything is formed. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. The thread-like fungi or down-like substance which forms on bodies, particularly when exposed to warm or damp air, and which prey upon them and destroy their valuable properties. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. That in which anything is cast and receives its form; the matrix; a shape for confectionery; the cast or form given. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for mould

  1. Instead of feeling the despair we expect, we are amazed at our own indifference, which again is succeeded by a renewed capacity for judging facts as they are, and by a new energy to mould our lives upon a better plan. – Sant' Ilario by F. Marion Crawford
  2. Place the flour and butter in a basin and beat them thoroughly, then add the salt, pepper, milk, the eggs well beaten, and the tender green part of the asparagus cut very small; stir all well together, then pour into a well- buttered mould or basin, and steam for one and a half hours. – New Vegetarian Dishes by Mrs. Bowdich
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