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Definitions of mouth

  1. To speak with a full, swelling, affected voice; to vociferate; to rant; to make mouths. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To speak unnaturally; rant; grimace. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To take into the mouth; to seize or grind with the mouth or teeth; to chew; to devour. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To utter with a voice affectedly big or swelling; to speak in a strained or unnaturally sonorous manner. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To form or cleanse with the mouth; to lick, as a bear her cub. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To make mouths at. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To utter with a swelling or pompous voice; to seize in the mouth; as, a dog mouths a bone. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To speak with a full, round, or loud, affected voice; to vociferate; to rant. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To put mouth to mouth; to kiss. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To make grimaces, esp. in ridicule or contempt. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To make faces. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. touch with the mouth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. express in speech; "She talks a lot of nonsense"; "This depressed patient does not verbalize" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. To utter with a voice affectedly big or swelling: to seize with the mouth; to chew; to devour; to reproach; to insult. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. The opening in the head of an animal by which food is received, and containing the organs of mastication and of voice; the instr. of speech; any opening or channel by which a thing is received or discharged; an entrance; the part of a river or creek where its waters join those of a sea or other large body of water. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. an impudent or insolent rejoinder; "don't give me any of your sass" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. the opening of a jar or bottle; "the jar had a wide mouth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. the externally visible part of the oral cavity on the face and the system of organs surrounding the opening; "she wiped lipstick from her mouth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge; "he stuffed his mouth with candy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. the point where a stream issues into a larger body of water; "New York is at the mouth of the Hudson" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. an opening that resembles a mouth (as of a cave or a gorge); "he rode into the mouth of the canyon"; "they built a fire at the mouth of the cave" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a person conceived as a consumer of food; "he has four mouths to feed" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. (informal) a spokesperson (as a lawyer) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. articulate silently; form words with the lips only; "She mouthed a swear word" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. The opening through which an animal receives food; the aperture between the jaws or between the lips; also, the cavity, containing the tongue and teeth, between the lips and the pharynx; the buccal cavity. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. An opening affording entrance or exit; orifice; aperture; Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The opening of a vessel by which it is filled or emptied, charged or discharged; as, the mouth of a jar or pitcher; the mouth of the lacteal vessels, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The opening or entrance of any cavity, as a cave, pit, well, or den. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The opening through which the waters of a river or any stream are discharged. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. The entrance into a harbor. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The crosspiece of a bridle bit, which enters the mouth of an animal. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A principal speaker; one who utters the common opinion; a mouthpiece. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Cry; voice. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Speech; language; testimony. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A wry face; a grimace; a mow. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The opening in the head of an animal through which it receives food and utters sounds; an opening through which to go in or out; as, the mouth of a cave; an opening for putting anything in or out; as, the mouth of a bottle; instrument of speaking; grimace. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Mouther. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The opening in the head of an animal by which it eats and utters sound: opening or entrance, as of a bottle, river, etc.: the instrument of speaking: a speaker:-pl. MOUTHS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Opening into which an anima receives its food; opening or entrance. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To utter overloud or pompously. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. The orifice at which food is taken; any opening or orifice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. The aperture in the head of an animal, by which it utters sound and receives food; the opening of a vessel or of a river; the opening or entrance of a cave, pit, well, or den; instrument of speaking; principal speaker; voice. To make mouths, to distort the mouth; to pout. To stop the mouth, to put to silence. Down in the mouth, dejected. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

What are the misspellings for mouth?

Usage examples for mouth

  1. Turning to the man whose mouth had been damaged he muttered: " Go at him again." – Furze the Cruel by John Trevena
  2. The little girl opened her mouth to speak. – Elizabeth and her German Garden by "Elizabeth", AKA Marie Annette Beauchamp
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