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Definitions of nominative

  1. The case of the subject of a finite verb. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. The naming case, the case of the subject. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. Case of the subject of the verb. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4. The case of the subject of a sentence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. named; bearing the name of a specific person; "nominative shares of stock" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (grammar) serving as or indicating the subject of a verb and words identified with the subject of a copular verb; "nominative noun endings"; "predicate nominative" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. serving as or indicating the subject of a verb and words identified with the subject of a copular verb; "nominative noun endings"; "predicate nominative" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. Giving a name; naming; designating; - said of that case or form of a noun which stands as the subject of a finite verb. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Naming or being, in grammar, the case of the subject of a finite verb. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Naming: (gram.) applied to the case of the subject. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Naming or being the subject of a sentence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. Relating to the subject. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. That simply names; that forms the subject, or part of the subject, of the verb. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for nominative

  1. Whenever the sentence is introduced by a phrase consisting in part of a noun in the plural, or several nouns in the singular or plural, and, especially, where the subject follows the verb; care must be taken to keep the nominative well in mind, so that the verb may be in strict accord with it. – Slips of Speech by John H. Bechtel
  2. The Greek takes sadai as breasts and nominative to the verb: Do the breasts of the rock give out? – Jeremiah by George Adam Smith
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