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Definitions of number

  1. a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program; "he did his act three times every evening"; "she had a catchy little routine"; "it was one of the best numbers he ever did" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. add up in number or quantity; "The bills amounted to $2,000"; "The bill came to $2,000" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. put into a group; "The academy counts several Nobel Prize winners among its members" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. determine the number or amount of; "Can you count the books on your shelf?"; "Count your change" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the property possessed by a sum or total or indefinite quantity of units or individuals; "he had a number of chores to do"; "the number of parameters is small"; "the figure was about a thousand" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a numeral or string of numerals that is used for identification; "she refused to give them her Social Security number" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. one of a series published periodically; "she found an old issue of the magazine in her dentist's waitingroom" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. place a limit on the number of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. enumerate; "We must number the names of the great mathematicians" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. an item of merchandise offered for sale; "she preferred the black nylon number"; "this sweater is an all-wool number" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. (informal) a clothing measurement; "a number 13 shoe" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the grammatical category for the forms of nouns and pronouns and verbs that are used depending on the number of entities involved (singular or dual or plural); "in English the subject and the verb must agree in number" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. the number is used in calling a particular telephone; "he has an unlisted number" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a symbol used to represent a number; "he learned to write the numerals before he went to school" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. a concept of quantity derived from zero and units; "every number has a unique position in the sequence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. a clothing measurement; "a number 13 shoe" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. a select company of people; "I hope to become one of their number before I die" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. give numbers to; "You should number the pages of the thesis" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. That which admits of being counted or reckoned; a unit, or an aggregate of units; a numerable aggregate or collection of individuals; an assemblage made up of distinct things expressible by figures. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A collection of many individuals; a numerous assemblage; a multitude; many. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A numeral; a word or character denoting a number; as, to put a number on a door. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Numerousness; multitude. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The state or quality of being numerable or countable. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Quantity, regarded as made up of an aggregate of separate things. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The measure of the relation between quantities or things of the same kind; that abstract species of quantity which is capable of being expressed by figures; numerical value. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To count; to reckon; to ascertain the units of; to enumerate. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To reckon as one of a collection or multitude. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To give or apply a number or numbers to; to assign the place of in a series by order of number; to designate the place of by a number or numeral; as, to number the houses in a street, or the apartments in a building. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To amount; to equal in number; to contain; to consist of; as, the army numbers fifty thousand. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. That which is regulated by count; poetic measure, as divisions of time or number of syllables; hence, poetry, verse; - chiefly used in the plural. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A unit; one, or more than one; a total of units; multitude; one of a series; in grammar, quality of a word by which it refers to one (singular number), or to more than one (plural number); poetry, meter, or verse: usually in plural; as, he wrote in numbers. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To count; mark with a number; amount to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. The place of any unit in a series; see No. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  35. That by which things are counted or computed: a collection of things: more than one: a unit in counting: a numerical figure: the measure of multiplicity: sounds distributed into harmonies: metre, verse, esp. in pl.: (gram.) the difference in words to express singular or plural:-pl. the 4th book of the Old Test. from its having the numbers of the Israelites. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. To count: to reckon as one of a multitude: to mark with a number: to amount to. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. NUMBERER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. A collection of things or persons; a unit; verse; in gram., difference expressing the singular or plural. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To count; reckon. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To count; reckon; designate by number; amount to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A numeral. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A unit or collection of units. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. The science of numerals. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Poetic measure; commonly in the plural. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. The form indicating the singular or plural. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A unit; an assemblage of units; more than one; many; a multitude; one of a series; measure, or the order and quantity of syllables constituting feet; verse; the difference of termination of a word, to express unity or plurality. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. To ascertain the units of any sum or multitude; to reckon among; to amount to; to mark with a number. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. One, or more than one; many; a multitude; a collection of units or things of the same kind; the variations in the endings of words, as of nouns and verbs, to express sing, or plu.; division of a work published in parts; in the plu. numbers, poetic measure, or verse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. To reckon as one of a collection or multitude; to count; to calculate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. Like most Oriental nations, it is probable that the Hebrews in their written calculations made use of the letters of the alphabet. That they did so in post-Babylonian times we have conclusive evidence in the Maccabaean coins; and it is highly probable that this was the ease also in earlier times. But though, on the one hand, it is certain that in all existing MSS of the Hebrew text of the Old Testament the numerical expressions are written at length, yet, on the other, the variations in the several versions between themselves and from the Hebrew text, added to the evident inconsistencies in numerical statement between certain passages of that text itself seems to prove that some shorter mode of writing was originally in vogue, liable to be misunderstood, and in fact misunderstood by copyists and translators. These variations appear to have proceeded from the alphabetic method of writing numbers. There can be little doubt, however, that some at least of the numbers mentioned in Scripture are intended to be representative rather than determinative. Certain numbers, as 7,10,40,100, were regarded as giving the idea of completeness. Without entering into St. Augustines theory of this usage, we may remark that the notion of representative numbers in certain cases is one extremely common among eastern nations, who have a prejudice against counting their possessions accurately; that it enters largely into many ancient systems of chronology, and that it is found in the philosophical and metaphysical speculations not only of the Pythagorean and other ancient schools of philosophy, both Greek and Roman, but also in those of the later Jewish writers, of the Gnostics, and also of such Christian writers se St. Augustine himself. We proceed to give some instances of numbers used, (a) representatively, and thus probably by design indefinitely, or, (b) definitely, but, as we may say, preferentially, i.e. because some meaning (which we do not in all cases understand) was attached to them. 1. Seven as denoting either plurality or completeness, perhaps because seven days completed the week is so frequent as to make a selection only of instances necessary, e.g. seven fold ( Genesis 4:24 ) seven times , i.e. completely, ( Leviticus 26:24 ; Psalms 12:6 ) seven (i.e. many) ways, ( 28:25 ) 2. Ten as a preferential number is exemplified in the Ten Commandments and the law of tithe. 3. Seventy , as compounded of 7 X 10, appears frequently e.g. seventy fold. ( Genesis 4:24 ; Matthew 18:22 ) Its definite use appears in the offerings of 70 shekels, ( Numbers 7:13 Numbers 7:19 ) ff,; the 70 elders, ch. ( Numbers 11:16 ) 70 years of captivity. ( Jeremiah 25:11 ) 4. Five appears in the table of punishments, of legal requirements, ( Exodus 22:1 ; Leviticus 5:16 ; 22:14 ; 27:15 ; Numbers 5:7 ; 18:16 ) and in the five empires of Daniel. ( Daniel 2:1 ) ... 5. Four is used in reference to the 4 winds, ( Daniel 7:2 ) and the so-called 4 corners of the earth; the creatures, each with 4 wings and 4 faces, of Ezekiel, ( Ezekiel 1:5 ) ff.; 4 rivers of Paradise ( Genesis 2:10 ) 4 beasts, ( Daniel 7:1 ) ... and Reve 4:6 the 4 equal-sided temple-chamber. ( Ezekiel 40:47 ) 6. Three was regarded, by both the Jews and other nations as a specially complete and mystic number. 7. Twelve (3X4) appears in 12 tribes 12 stones in the high priests breastplate, 12 apostles, 12 foundation-stones, and 12 gates. ( Revelation 21:19-21 ) 8. Lastly, the mystic number 666. ( Revelation 13:18 ) biblestudytools.com
  51. That which is regulated by count; poetic measure, as divisions of time or number of syllables; hence, poetry, verse; -- chiefly used in the plural. mso.anu.edu.au
  52. num'b[.e]r, n. that by which things are counted or computed: a collection of things: more than one: a unit in counting: a numerical figure: the measure of multiplicity: sounds distributed into harmonies: metre, verse, esp. in pl.: (gram.) the difference in words to express singular or plural: (pl.) the fourth book of the Old Testament.--v.t. to count: to reckon as one of a multitude: to mark with a number: to amount to.--n. NUM'BERER.--adj. NUM'BERLESS, without number: more than can be counted.--ns. NUMERABIL'ITY, N[=U]'MERABLENESS.--adj. N[=U]'MERABLE, that may be numbered or counted.--adv. N[=U]'MERABLY.--adj. N[=U]'MERAL, pertaining to, consisting of, or expressing number.--n. a figure or mark used to express a number, as 1, 2, 3, &c.: (gram.) a word used to denote a number.--adv. N[=U]'MERALLY, according to number.--adj. N[=U]'MERARY, belonging to a certain number: contained within or counting as one of a body or a number--opp. to Supernumerary.--v.t. N[=U]'MER[=A]TE, to point off and read as figures: (orig.) to enumerate, to number.--ns. N[=U]MER[=A]'TION, act of numbering: the art of reading numbers, and expressing their values; N[=U]'MER[=A]TOR, one who numbers: the upper number of a vulgar fraction, which expresses the number of fractional parts taken.--adjs. N[=U]MER'IC, -AL, belonging to, or consisting in, number: the same both in number and kind.--adv. N[=U]MER'ICALLY.--n. N[=U]MEROS'ITY, numerousness: harmonious flow.--adj. N[=U]'MEROUS, great in number: being many.--adv. N[=U]'MEROUSLY.--n. N[=U]'MEROUSNESS. [Fr. nombre--L. numerus, number.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. (written No, for numero= in number, with pl. Nos, before distinguishing figure, as bedroom No 15, Nos 1-10). Tale, count, sum, company, or aggregate, of person (also of) or things (also of) or abstract units, symbol or figure representing such aggregate, ticket &c. bearing such figure, person or thing (esp. single issue of magazine, or part of opera &c.) whose place in series is indicated by such figure, (the n. of fools is infinite; Numbers, abbr. Num., O.T. book containing census; the greatest n. on record is 59 persons; to the n. of 80, as many as; GOLDEN n.; science of nn., arithmetic; took the cabman\'s n.; sleeps in No 5; lose the n. of one\'s mess, die; n. one, oneself, esp. in take care of n. one; story issued in nn., in parts successively published bearing nn.; back n., earlier issue of magazine, fig. anything out of date; is not of our n., included among us; is now added to the n. of my enemies); (sing. or pl.) large, small, &c., or large, collection or company of or abs. (were present in great, only in small, nn.; saw a great, or a, n. of birds; a small n. came; there are nn. who live by begging); (pl.) numerical preponderance (won by nn. or force of nn.); numerical reckoning (the laws of n. & proportion pervade Nature; without n., innumerable, also numberless a.; in n., when counted or estimated, numerically, as one people exceeds another in n.); (Gram.) class of word-forms including all singular, all plural, or all dual &c. words (Greek has three nn.; \'things\' is of the plural n.); rhythm; (pl.) groups of musical notes, metrical feet, verses. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. Count, ascertain n. of; (pass.) be restricted in n. (his days or years are numbered, he has not long to live); include, regard as, among, in, or with some class; assign a n. to, distinguish with a n.; have lived, live, (so many years); be able to show (so many inhabitants &c.); amount to (specified n.). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. N 10 Downing street, N 10, (used for) Prime Minister\'s official residence (when he is also First Lord of the Treasury). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. [L., Gr.] Any particular aggregate of units. (For Abstract Number, Cardinal Number, Prime Number, etc., vide Abstract number; Cardinal numbers; Prime meridian; etc. ) Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  57. n. [French, Latin] A series of units or aggregate of quantities;—a single unit ; one of a series ; simple number ;- a particular aggregate of units ;- an indefinite aggregate of units; collection of particulars ; assemblage of individuals ; multitude ;—in grammar, an inflection in the form of a word to signify plurality or unity, called plural or singular number ;- a ticket or badge bearing a distinctive figure ;—a part or division of a book issued in separate portions ;- in poetry, the quantity of syllables or feet in a line or verse ; metrical measure ;- hence, pl. Verse ; song ; poetry. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for number?

X