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Definitions of oar

  1. an implement used to propel or steer a boat Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. An implement for impelling a boat, being a slender piece of timber, usually ash or spruce, with a grip or handle at one end and a broad blade at the other. The part which rests in the rowlock is called the loom. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. An oarsman; a rower; as, he is a good oar. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. An oarlike swimming organ of various invertebrates. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To row. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. A pole with a flat or spoonshaped blade at one end, used for rowing a boat; one who rows. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. A light pole with a flat end for rowing boats. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To impel by rowing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. Instrument to row boats. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. To propel with an oar; use as an oar. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. A bladed wooden implement for propelling a boat. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A long pole with a flattened blade for rowing boats. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. To row. To ship the oars, to place them in the rowlocks. To unship the oars, to take them out of the rowlocks. To boat the oars, to lay the oars in the boat. To lie on one's oars, to rest on one's oars or from work. See Feather. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. A pole with a broad flat end or blade, used in the rowing of boats. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. [=o]r, n. a light pole with a flat feather or spoon-shaped end (the blade) for propelling a boat: an oar-like appendage for swimming, as the antennæ of an insect or crustacean, &c.: an oarsman.--v.t. to impel by rowing.--v.i. to row.--n. OAR'AGE, oars collectively.--adj. OARED, furnished with oars.--ns. OAR'LAP, a rabbit with its ears standing out at right-angles to the head; OAR'-LOCK, a rowlock; OARS'MAN, one who rows with an oar; OARS'MANSHIP, skill in rowing.--adj. OAR'Y, having the form or use of oars.--BOAT OARS, to bring the oars inboard; FEATHER OARS, to turn the blades parallel to the water when reaching back for another stroke; LIE ON THE OARS, to cease rowing without shipping the oars: to rest, take things easily: to cease from work; PUT IN ONE'S OAR, to give advice when not wanted; SHIP, or UNSHIP, OARS, to place the oars in the rowlocks, or to take them out. [A.S. ár.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  16. Pole with blade used (usu. in even numbers) to propel boat by leverage, esp. one worked by single rower (cf. SWEEP) with both hands (cf. SCULL), or to steer (chained to the o., constrained to work hard& long, with allusion to galley-slaves; pair-o., four-o., &c., boat with two, four, &c., oo.; pulls a good o., is good oarsman; put in one\'s o., interfere; have an o. in every man\'s boat, be a meddler; rest on one\'s oo., cease work for a time); good, bad, young, practised, &c., oarsman; (fig.) wing, fin, arm used in swimming, &c.; oarsman, -woman, rower, whence oarsmanshii (3) n.; hence oarage (1) n. (poet.), (-)oared, oarless, oary (poet.), aa. (Vb) row (t. & i.; poet.; o. boat, water, air, one\'s way; o. one\'s arms or hands, move them as in swimming). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  17. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic] An instrument for rowing boats. Cabinet Dictionary

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