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Definitions of off

  1. from a particular thing or place or position; "ran away from the lion"; "wanted to get away from there"; "sent the children away to boarding school"; "the teacher waved the children away from the dead animal"; "went off to school"; "they drove off"; (`forth' is obsolete as in"go forth and preach") Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. at a distance in space or time; "the boat was 5 miles off (or away)"; "the party is still 2 weeks off (or away)"; "away back in the 18th century" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (of events) no longer planned or scheduled; "the wedding is definitely off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. in an unpalatable state; "sour milk" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. no longer on or in contact or attached; "clean off the dirt"; "he shaved off his mustache" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. not in operation or operational; "the oven is off"; "the lights are off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. below a satisfactory level; "an off year for tennis"; "his performance was off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. not performing or scheduled for duties; "He's off every Tuesday"; "he was off duty when it happened"; "an off-duty policeman" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. from a particular thing or place or position (`forth' is obsolete); "ran away from the lion"; "wanted to get away from there"; "sent the children away to boarding school"; "the teacher waved the children away from the dead animal"; "went off to school". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. From. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. In a general sense, denoting from or away from; as: Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Denoting distance or separation; as, the house is a mile off. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Denoting the action of removing or separating; separation; as, to take off the hat or cloak; to cut off, to pare off, to clip off, to peel off, to tear off, to march off, to fly off, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Denoting a leaving, abandonment, departure, abatement, interruption, or remission; as, the fever goes off; the pain goes off; the game is off; all bets are off. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Denoting a different direction; not on or towards: away; as, to look off. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Denoting opposition or negation. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Not on; away from; as, to be off one's legs or off the bed; two miles off the shore. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. On the farther side; most distant; on the side of an animal or a team farthest from the driver when he is on foot; in the United States, the right side; as, the off horse or ox in a team, in distinction from the nigh or near horse or ox; the off leg. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Designating a time when one is not strictly attentive to business or affairs, or is absent from his post, and, hence, a time when affairs are not urgent; as, he took an off day for fishing: an off year in politics. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The side of the field that is on the right of the wicket keeper. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Away. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Away; begone; - a command to depart. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Most distant. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. Most distant; on the opposite or farther side; as, the off horse of a team; away; as, I must be off. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Away; as, take off your hat; he stood afar off. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Not on; away from; as, take the bowl off the shelf; not in condition; distant from; as, a mile off shore. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Begone. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. From: away from: on the opposite side of a question: not on. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Most distant: on the opposite or further side. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Not on. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. Away! depart!. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. Away; not on. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. From; not on. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. Farther; aside from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Entirely to an end; utterly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Extending away or out from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Begone! away! - off color, unsatisfactory; inferior. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Away; not toward. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. Begone; depart. Off hand, without study or preparation. Off and on, at one time applying and engaged, then absent or remiss. To be off, to depart or to recede from an agreement or design. To come off, to escape. To go off, to depart. To take off, to mimic with ridicule. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Not on; distant from. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. Denoting distance; in driving, applied to the right-hand side. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. From; away; not towards; denoting the action of removing or separating, as to cut off. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. Not on;, int. Away; begone; among seamen, abreast of or near; be off, away; depart; from off, denoting removal; ill off or badly off, having fared ill; in a state of poverty; off and on, at one time anxious, at another careless, about anything; off-hand, without preparation or hesitation; without respect; of late, recently; of old, formerly; in time long past; to be off, to depart; to recede from an intended contract or design; to come off, to escape; to fare in the event; to happen, as the race came off; to get off, to alight; to come down; to make escape; to go off, to depart; to desert; to take fire and be discharged, as a gun; to take off, to take away; to mimic; well off, having fared well; in good circumstances. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. Away; begone; -- a command to depart. mso.anu.edu.au
  45. Away; begone; a command to depart. dictgcide_fs
  46. Designating a time when one's performance is below normal; as, he had an off day. dictgcide_fs
  47. of, adv. from: away from: on the opposite side of a question.--adj. most distant: on the opposite or farther side: on the side of a cricket-field right of the wicket-keeper and left of the bowler: not devoted to usual business, as an OFF DAY.--prep. not on.--interj. away! depart!--adj. and adv. OFF'-AND-ON', occasional.--adj. OFF'-COL'OUR, of inferior value: indisposed.--n. OFF'-COME (Scot.), an apology, pretext: any exhibition of temper, &c.--adv. OFF'-HAND, at once: without hesitating.--adj. without study: impromptu: free and easy.--adj. OFF'ISH, reserved in manner.--ns. OFF'-PRINT, a reprint of a single article from a magazine or other periodical--the French tirage à part, German Abdruck; OFF'-RECK'ONING, an allowance formerly made to certain British officers from the money appropriated for army clothing.--v.t. OFF'SADDLE, to unsaddle.--ns. OFF'SCOURING, matter scoured off: refuse: anything vile or despised; OFF'-SCUM, refuse or scum; OFF'SET (in accounts), a sum or value set off against another as an equivalent: a short lateral shoot or bulb: a terrace on a hillside: (archit.) a horizontal ledge on the face of a wall: in surveying, a perpendicular from the main line to an outlying point.--v.t. (in accounts) to place against as an equivalent.--n. OFF'SHOOT, that which shoots off from the main stem, stream, &c.: anything growing out of another.--adv. OFF'SHORE, in a direction from the shore, as a wind: at a distance from the shore.--adj. from the shore.--ns. OFF'SIDE, the right-hand side in driving: the farther side; OFF'SPRING, that which springs from another: a child, or children: issue: production of any kind.--OFF ONE'S CHUMP, HEAD, demented; OFF ONE'S FEED, indisposed to eat.--BE OFF, to go away quickly; COME OFF, GO OFF, SHOW OFF, TAKE OFF, &c. (see COME, GO, SHOW, TAKE, &c.); ILL OFF, poor or unfortunate; TELL OFF, to count: to assign, as for a special duty; WELL OFF, rich, well provided. [Same as Of.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. Away, at or to a distance, (rode o.; beat o. the attack; keep assailant o.; ward o. disaster; take oneself, be, make, o., depart; o. with you!, go; o. with his head!, behead him; fall, go, o., deteriorate; of ship, fall o., become less close to wind; the bullet glanced o.; go o., fall asleep; is far, three miles, two years, o.); (so as to be) out of position, not on or touching or dependent or attached, loose, separate, gone, (my hat is o.; take his clothes o.; cut, break, shake, &c., o.; throw o. reserve, become open or candid; be o. with the old love, have severed connexion; get one\'s daughters, stock, o., disposed of by marriage, sale; the gilt is o., disillusionment has come; we are o. now, just started, starting, or about to start); so as to break continuity or continuance, discontinued, stopped, not-obtainable, (broke o., ceased to speak; leave o. work; the engagement, bargain, negotiation, is o.; declare o., refuse or rescind engagement; cut o. supplies; the gas, asparagus, is o., no longer to be got); to the end, entirely, so as to be clear, (clear, drink, pay, polish, work, o.); BUY, COME, DASH, GET, MARK, PALM, PASS, RATTLE, SHOW, TAKE, o.; RIGHT, STRAIGHT, o.; well, badly, comfortably, &c., o., so circumstanced or supplied with money; o. &on, intermittently, waveringly, now& again; o.-load, o.-saddle, S.-Afr., for un-. (Prep.) from, away or down or up from, disengaged or distant from, (so as to be) no longer on, (drove them o. the seas; is o. the beaten track; fell o. a ladder; take cover o. dish; eats o. silver plate; take thing, matter, o. one\'s hands, relieve him of it; had borrowed £20 o. plaintiff vulg.; o. one\'s HEAD; o. colour, out of condition, indisposed; took something o. the price; is o. duty or work; cut a slice o., dine o., the joint; was only a yard o. me; keep ship two points o. the wind; in a street o. the Strand, turning out of it: from o. archaic, poet., or vulg., =o.; o.-hand, extempore, without premeditation, unceremoniously, whence offhand, offhanded. aa., offhandedly adv., offhandedness n.; o.shore, a short way out to sea; so o.-shore fisheries; o.-shore wind, blowing seawards; anchored o. the point, cape, &c., opposite& a short way from it; o. side in football, between ball& opponents goal; so o.-side play, rule). (Adj.) farther, far, (on the o. side of the wall); (of horses &c. or vehicles) right (opp. NEAR, w. ref. to side at which rider usu. mounts; the o. leader, front wheel, hind leg, side); (Cricket) towards, in, or coming from, that half of the field as divided by line through two middle stumps in which playing batsman does not stand (opp. ON, LEG; an o. drive, whence offdrive v.t.; o. stump; LONG o.; an o. break); subordinate, divergent, (in an o. street; fig. of argument &c., that is an o. issue); contingent, improbable, (there is an o. chance that); disengaged (will do it on my next o. day); o.-licence, to sell beer &c. for consumption o. the premises; o.-print, separatum, printed copy of article &c. that was orig. part of larger publication. (N.; cricket) the o. side. (Vb; colloq.) announce intention of abandoning or annulling (negotiation, agreement, undertaking), withdraw from negotiation or engagement with (person). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. (Naut.) Abreast of or near, as off the Nore. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  50. (Naut.) From ; as on and off a shore, i.e. towards and away from it. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  51. (Naut.) In driving, the Off side is the right ; the Near side is the left. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  52. (Naut.) Opposed to Near ; as nothing off, keep her to the wind. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  53. adv. From ; away from ;— denoting distance ;— separation ; removal ;— departure, abatement, remission ;— opposite direction ;— the opposite side of a question. Cabinet Dictionary
  54. prep. Not on ; away from. Cabinet Dictionary

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