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Definitions of old

  1. used informally especially for emphasis; "a real honest-to-god live cowboy"; "had us a high old time"; "went upriver to look at a sure-enough fish wheel" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. lacking originality or spontaneity; no longer new; "moth-eaten theories about race" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. of an earlier time; "his old classmates" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. just preceding something else in time or order; "the previous owner"; "my old house was larger" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (linguistics) of a very early stage in development; "Old English is also called Anglo Saxon"; "Old High German is High German from the middle of the 9th to the end of the 11th century" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. old in experience; "an old offender"; "the older soldiers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. of long duration; not new; "old tradition"; "old house"; "old wine"; "old country"; "old friendships"; "old money" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (used especially of persons) having lived for a relatively long time or attained a specific age; especially not young; often used as a combining form to indicate an age as specified as in `a week-old baby'; "an old man's eagle mind"--William Butler Yeats; "his mother is very old"; "a ripe old age"; "how old are you?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. (used for emphasis) very familiar; "good old boy"; "same old story" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. past times (especially in the phrase `in days of old') Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. of a very early stage in development; "Old English is also called Anglo Saxon"; "Old High German is High German from the middle of the 9th to the end of the 11th century" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. Open country. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Not young; advanced far in years or life; having lived till toward the end of the ordinary term of living; as, an old man; an old age; an old horse; an old tree. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Not new or fresh; not recently made or produced; having existed for a long time; as, old wine; an old friendship. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Formerly existing; ancient; not modern; preceding; original; as, an old law; an old custom; an old promise. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Long practiced; hence, skilled; experienced; cunning; as, an old offender; old in vice. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Long cultivated; as, an old farm; old land, as opposed to new land, that is, to land lately cleared. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Worn out; weakened or exhausted by use; past usefulness; as, old shoes; old clothes. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. More than enough; abundant. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Old-fashioned; wonted; customary; as of old; as, the good old times; hence, colloquially, gay; jolly. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Used colloquially as a term of cordiality and familiarity. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Continued in life; advanced in the course of existence; having (a certain) length of existence; - designating the age of a person or thing; as, an infant a few hours old; a cathedral centuries old. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Aged; antiquated; hence, wanting in the mental vigor or other qualities belonging to youth; - used disparagingly as a term of reproach. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Having existed or lived many years; aged; as, an old oak; having an appearance of age; as, an old face; having reached a certain age; as, twenty-one years old; ancient; out of date; as, old customs; old coins; long used; not new; as, old shoes; long practiced; as, old habits; belonging to the past; as, one's old home; long experienced; as, he is an old hand at that work. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Older. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Oldest. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. Former times; as, in days of old. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Oldness. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Advanced in years: having been long in existence: decayed by time: out of date: ancient: having the age or duration of: long practiced. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Aged; that has existed long; ancient; out of date. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. Having a great age; having some specified age; aged. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Antiquated; worthless. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Familiar, customary. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Advanced in age; decayed by time; existing long; not new or fresh; ancient; of any duration whatever; previous; long practised; cultivated for long; more than enough; crafty. Old age, advanced years. Old-clothesman, a dealer in old clothes. Old-fashioned, long out of fashion. Old-gentleman, the evil one. Old-maid, an unmarried female somewhat advanced in years. Old red sandstone, a series of red sandstone rocks lying below the coal formation. Old style. Old Testament, that part of the Bible which contains the canonical books written previous to Christ. Old Tom, a sort of strong gin. Old-wife, a prating old woman; a man like an old woman in his habits. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. Far advanced in years; aged; used of any length of time, as, How old is he? he is two years old; decayed or injured by time or long use; out of date; not new or fresh. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. Continued in life; advanced in the course of existence; having a certain length of existence; -- designating the age of a person or thing; as, an infant a few hours old; a cathedral centuries old. mso.anu.edu.au
  37. Aged; antiquated; hence, wanting in the mental vigor or other qualities belonging to youth; -- used disparagingly as a term of reproach. mso.anu.edu.au
  38. Continued in life; advanced in the course of existence; having (a certain) length of existence; designating the age of a person or thing; as, an infant a few hours old; a cathedral centuries old. dictgcide_fs
  39. Aged; antiquated; hence, wanting in the mental vigor or other qualities belonging to youth; used disparagingly as a term of reproach. dictgcide_fs
  40. [=o]ld, adj. advanced in years: having been long in existence: worn out: out of date, old-fashioned: ancient, former, antique, early: (coll.) great, high: having the age or duration of: long practised: sober, wise.--n. OLD-CLOTHES'MAN, one who buys cast-off garments.--v.i. OLD'EN, to grow old, to become affected by age.--adj. old, ancient.--adj. OLD-FASH'IONED, of a fashion like that used long ago: out of date: clinging to old things and old styles: with manners like those of a grown-up person (said of a child).--n. OLD-FASH'IONEDNESS.--adjs. OLD-F[=O]'GYISH, like an old fogy; OLD-GEN'TLEMANLY, characteristic of an old gentleman; OLD'ISH, somewhat old; OLD'-LIGHT, denoting those of the Seceders from the Church of Scotland who continued to hold unchanged the principle of the connection between church and state--the position maintained by the first Seceders in 1733.--n. one of this body.--ns. OLD-MAID'HOOD, OLD-MAID'ISM.--adj. OLD-MAID'ISH, like the conventional old maid, prim.--ns. OLD'NESS; OLD'STER (coll.), a man getting old: a midshipman of four years' standing, a master's mate.--adj. OLD'-TIME, of or pertaining to times long gone by: of long standing: old-fashioned.--n. OLD'-TIM'ER, one who has lived in a place or kept a position for a long time.--adjs. OLD-WOM'ANISH, like an old woman; OLD'-WORLD, belonging to earlier times, antiquated, old-fashioned.--n. the Eastern Hemisphere.--OLD AGE, the later part of life; OLD BACHELOR, an unmarried man somewhat advanced in years; OLD ENGLISH (see ENGLISH): the form of black letter used by 16th-century English printers; OLD GOLD, a dull gold colour like tarnished gold, used in textile fabrics; OLD HARRY, NICK, ONE, &c., the devil; OLD HUNDRED, properly OLD HUNDREDTH, a famous tune set in England about the middle of the 16th century to Kethe's version of the 100th Psalm, marked 'Old Hundredth' in Tate and Brady's new version in 1696; OLD MAID, a woman who has not been married, and is past the usual age of marriage: a simple game played by matching cards from a pack from which a card (usually a queen) has been removed; OLD MAN, unregenerate human nature: (coll.) one's father, guardian, or employer (usually with 'the'); OLD RED SANDSTONE (see SAND); OLD SALT, an experienced sailor; OLD SCHOOL, of, or resembling, earlier days, old-fashioned; OLD SONG, a mere trifle, a very small price; OLD SQUAW, a sea-duck of the northern hemisphere--also OLD WIFE; OLD STYLE (often written with a date O.S.), the mode of reckoning time before 1752, according to the Julian calendar or year of 365¼ days; OLD TESTAMENT (see TESTAMENT); OLD TOM, a strong kind of English gin; OLD WIFE, a prating old woman, or even a man: a chimney-cap for curing smoking.--OF OLD, long ago, in ancient times, or belonging to such. [A.S. eald; Dut. oud; Ger. alt.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. (ELDER, -est, in particular uses; ordinarily older, -est), & n. Advanced in age, far on in natural period of existence, not young or near its beginning, (the o., aged people; young& o., every one; o. age, later part of life; O. Lady of Thread needle Street, Bank of England; o. man of the sea, person who can not be shaken off, w. ref. to tale of Sindbad; o. man &c.; my &c. o. man colloq., husband; o. man\'s beard, kind of moss, also TRAVELLER\'s Joy; my &c. o. woman colloq., wife; o. woman, fussy or timid man, whence old-womanish, old-womanly, aa., old-womanishness, old-womanliness, nn.; my &c. o. bones, I or me &c. who am o.; the century grows o.); having characteristics, experience, feebleness, &c., of age (o. head on young shoulders, wisdom beyond one\'s years; child has an o. face; o. buffer, fogy, &c.; a man is as o. as he feels), worn, dilapidated, shabby, (o. clothes &c.); (appended to period of time) of age (is ten years o., a ten-year-o. boy, a boy OF ten years o., could read Greek at ten years o.; also ellipt. four &c. -year-o., person or animal, esp. racehorse, of that age, w. pl. -olds); practised or inveterate in action or quality or as agent &c. (o. in crime, folly, cunning, diplomacy: an o. campaigner, offender; o. bird, person on his guard against snares; o. hand, practised workman, person of experience in something, at doing; o. STAGER; o. bachelor, man confirmed in bachelorhood; o. maid, elderly spinster, whence old-maidish a., also precise& tidy& fidgety man, also a round card game); dating from far back, made long ago, long established or known or familiar or dear, ancient, not new or recent, primeval, (o. Ocean, Night, &c.; o. red sandstone; of o. standing, long established; so o.-established; o. as the hills; o. countries, long inhabited or civilized; o. friends; an o. debt, grudge, o. SCORES; an o. name, family; o. wine, matured with keeping; so O. Tom, kind of gin; o. gold, colour of tarnished gold; o. CATHOLIC; the o., what is not new; o. testament; o. boy, chap, fellow, man, esp. in voc., intimate or person treated as such; O. England; the o. one or gentleman, O. Harry, Nick, Scratch, &c., the devil; good o. with name, slang exclamation in real or ironical commendation of person\'s or thing\'s performance; have a fine, good, high, &c., o. time &c. slang, be well amused or entertained); belonging only or chiefly to the past, obsolete or obsolescent, out of date, antiquated, antique, concerned with antiquity, not modern, bygone, only lingering on, former, quondam, (the good o. times, customs &c. of earlier generations; o. annals; o. fashions, that have gone or are going out, whence old-fashioned a., old-fashionedness n., opp. new-fangled &c.; am old-fashioned enough to think, used in ironical self-depreciation; of the o. school, o.-fashioned; the o. country, home, &c., used by colonists or colonials of mother-country; call up o. memories; the o. order changeth; have lost my o. beliefs; o. boy, former member of school; so o. Etonian &c.; the O. COMEDY; o. London, Paris, England, &c., London &c. as it once was, or the extant relics of its former state; the o. man, one\'s unregenerate self; the O. World, Eastern hemisphere; o.-world, not American, also belonging to o. times, & so o.-time attrib.; O.STYLE, abbr. o.s.; the o. year, just ended or about to end; o. clothes, discarded; o.-clothes-man, dealer in these); hence oldish (2) a., oldness n. (rare). (N.) o. time (only in of o. adj. & adv., as the men of o., of o. there were giants; have heard it of o., from long ago). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. O. Age Pensions Act, that of 1908 providing weekly payment by the State to those over 70 whose income is not over £31 10s.; the O. Hundredth, the hymn \'All people that on carth do dwell\', a version of Ps. c by W. Kethe first printed in the Geneva English Psalter (1561); the O. Masters, Royal Academy\'s annual winter exhibition at Burlington House. Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for old?

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