Spellcheck.net

Language:

English - United States Change

Enter your text below and click here to check the spelling

Definitions of order

  1. To give command. Order of battle, the arrangement and disposition of the different parts of an army for action. Regimental orders, such orders as proceed immediately from a commanding officer for the observance of the regiment. Holy orders, the Christian ministry. Order of the day, prearranged order of business. To take orders, to be ordained. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To regulate or manage; command; conduct; direct; to give a command for. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To arrange: to conduct: to command. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To arrange; command. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To command; put in order; regulate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To give orders; to issue commands. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To give a command or order. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To give command. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. assign a rank or rating to; "how would you rank these students?"; "The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. To regulate; to methodize; to conduct; to command; to manage. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To regulate; to direct or command; to manage; to give directions to. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. Orders, or holy orders, in the Episcopal Ch., the three orders of the Christian ministry, but usually understood as applying to deacons and priests. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. The clerical office. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. (architecture) one of the three styles of Greek architecture (or a style developed from the original three by the Romans) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. a degree in a continuum of size or quantity; "it was on the order of a mile"; "an explosion of a low order of magnitude" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. (often plural) a command given by a superior (e.g., a military or law enforcement officer) that must be obeyed; "the British ships dropped anchor and waited for orders from London" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. a request for food or refreshment (as served in a restaurant or bar etc.); "I gave the waiter my order" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. (biology) taxonomic group containing one or more families Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. a condition of regular or proper arrangement; "he put his desk in order"; "the machine is now in working order" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. (architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. a commercial document used to request someone to supply something in return for payment and providing specifications and quantities; "IBM received an order for a hundred computers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; "theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate order" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. established customary state (especially of society); "order ruled in the streets"; "law and order" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. place in a certain order; "order these files" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. bring order to or into; "Order these files" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. make a request for something; "Order me some flowers"; "order a work stoppage" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority; "I said to him to go home"; "She ordered him to do the shopping"; "The mother told the child to get dressed" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Of intellectual notions or ideas, like the topics of a discource. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Of periods of time or occurrences, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Right arrangement; a normal, correct, or fit condition; as, the house is in order; the machinery is out of order. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. The customary mode of procedure; established system, as in the conduct of debates or the transaction of business; usage; custom; fashion. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet; as, to preserve order in a community or an assembly. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. That which prescribes a method of procedure; a rule or regulation made by competent authority; as, the rules and orders of the senate. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A command; a mandate; a precept; a direction. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Hence: A commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods; a direction, in writing, to pay money, to furnish supplies, to admit to a building, a place of entertainment, or the like; as, orders for blankets are large. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a group or division of men in the same social or other position; also, a distinct character, kind, or sort; as, the higher or lower orders of society; talent of a high order. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A body of persons having some common honorary distinction or rule of obligation; esp., a body of religious persons or aggregate of convents living under a common rule; as, the Order of the Bath; the Franciscan order. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. An assemblage of genera having certain important characters in common; as, the Carnivora and Insectivora are orders of Mammalia. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. The placing of words and members in a sentence in such a manner as to contribute to force and beauty or clearness of expression. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. Rank; degree; thus, the order of a curve or surface is the same as the degree of its equation. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. To put in order; to reduce to a methodical arrangement; to arrange in a series, or with reference to an end. Hence, to regulate; to dispose; to direct; to rule. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. To give an order to; to command; as, to order troops to advance. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. To give an order for; to secure by an order; as, to order a carriage; to order groceries. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. A decision issued by a court. It can be a simple command--for example, ordering a recalcitrant witness to answer a proper question--or it can be a complicated and reasoned decision made after a hearing, directing that a party either do or refrain from some act. For example, following a hearing, the court may order that evidence gathered by the police not be introduced at trial; or a judge may issue a temporary restraining order. This term usually does not describe the final decision in a case, which most often is called a judgment.
  49. A body of persons having some common honorary distinction or rule of obligation; esp., a body of religious persons or aggregate of convents living under a common rule; as, the of the Bath; the Franciscan order. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; - often used in the plural; as, to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. Method or state of regular arrangement; settled way of doing something; as, an order of worship; right working condition; as, the machine is in good order; rule; regulation; command; as, to issue or obey an order; class; as, an order of plants; rank; as, the order of nobility; a religious fraternity; as, an order of monks; public quiet or observance of law; as, order in the streets; a commission for something; as, an order for groceries: holy orders, the three orders (bishop, priest, deacon), of the Christian ministry. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  52. Orderliness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. Regular arrangement: method: proper state: rule: regular government: command: a class: a society of persons: a religious fraternity: a scientific division of objects: (arch.) a system of the parts of columns:-pl. the Christian ministry. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  54. Regular arrangement; quiet; rule; command; a class or society. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  55. Methodical arrangement; tranquillity; settled rule; working condition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. A command; usage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. A class, as of society; a group superior to a genus. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. An honor conferred. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. A style of architecture. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. Regular or methodical arrangement; proper state; adherence to rule laid down; settled mode of proceeding or working; regularity; mandate; regulation; rank; class; division of men; a religious fraternity; care; a division intermediate between a class and a family; a system of several members, ornaments, and proportions of columns and pilasters, as the Tuscan, Doric, Ionie, Corinthian, and Composite. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  61. Of material things, like the books in a library. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. Methodical arrangement; regularity; established method or process; proper state; a law; a command; rank or class; a society or fraternity; a division of animals or plants between class and genus; in arch., one of the five principal methods employed by the ancients in constructing and ornamenting the columns of an edifice-these were the Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  63. Any group of organisms closely allied, ranking between the family and the class. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

Usage examples for order

  1. It is my opinion, for instance, that he wrote his book in order to make a beginning with the ladies. – Tommy and Grizel by J.M. Barrie
  2. Once or twice, Susannah had to excuse herself in order to go on with her work. – Out of the Air by Inez Haynes Irwin
X