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Definitions of ought

  1. expresses an emotional, practical, or other reason for doing something; "You had better put on warm clothes"; "You should call your mother-in-law"; "The State ought to repair the bridges" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. be logically necessary Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. A cipher; naught. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. See Aught. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Was or were under obligation to pay; owed. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Owned; possessed. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To be bound in duty or by moral obligation. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. of Owe Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To be necessary, fit, becoming, or expedient; to behoove; - in this sense formerly sometimes used impersonally or without a subject expressed. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To be under obligation; be fit, necessary, or proper: used chiefly as a helping verb. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. Anything; aught. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Same as AUGHT. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To be under obligation: to be proper or necessary. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. Anything. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. Imperfect, is under obligation; is fit or necessary. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To be under moral obligation to be or do. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. To be fitting or imperative. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Aught; anything. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. To be held or bound in duty or moral obligation; to be necessary; to behove; to be fit or proper. See Aught. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. Anything; a tittle or jot. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. A defective verb, formerly the pt. of owe; to be bound in duty or moral obligation. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. To be necessary, fit, becoming, or expedient; to behoove; -- in this sense formerly sometimes used impersonally or without a subject expressed. mso.anu.edu.au
  23. To be necessary, fit, becoming, or expedient; to behoove; in this sense formerly sometimes used impersonally or without a subject expressed. dictgcide_fs
  24. awt, n. (same as Aught) a vulgar corr. of nought.--adv. (Scot.) OUGHT'LINGS, at all, in any degree. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  25. awt, v.i. to be under obligation: to be proper or necessary.--n. OUGHT'NESS, rightness. [A.S. áhte, pa.t. of ágan, to owe.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  26. (vulg.). Figure denoting nothing, nought. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  27. (the only form in use, except archaic oughtest or oughtst, is ought serving as present or past finite) expressing duty, rightness, shortcoming, advisability, or strong probability; the past sense (except when merely due to sequence of tenses in reporting &c.) is indicated by a following perf. infin. Exx.: we o. to love our neighbours; it o. not to be allowed; you o. to know better; you o. to go to Pinafore; Eclipse o. to win; it o. to be done at once, have been done long ago; I told you it o. to be, have been, done; I said it, & still think I o. to have said it. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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