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Definitions of out

  1. To cause to be out; to eject; to expel. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To come out with; to make known. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To give out; to dispose of; to sell. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To come or go out; to get out or away; to become public. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. be made known; be disclosed or revealed; "The truth will out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. to state openly and publicly one's homosexuality; "This actor outed last year" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. reveal somebody else's homosexuality; "This actor was outed last week" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. From the inside of. In numerous self explaining compound verbs out adds the sense of surpassing or exceeding. usually meaning "more than, beyond, in excess"; as, outrank, outvote, outweigh, outbid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. a failure by a batter or runner to reach a base safely in baseball; "you only get 3 outs per inning" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. A word or words omitted by the compositor in setting up copy; an omission. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. One who, or that which, is out; especially, one who is out of office; - generally in the plural. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A place or space outside of something; a nook or corner; an angle projecting outward; an open space; - chiefly used in the phrase ins and outs; as, the ins and outs of a question. See under In. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. One who is not in office. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. An outside place. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. A person or thing that is out or omitted. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. One who or that which is without; opposed to in; a nook or corner; an open space. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. Expressing impatience, anger, a desire to be rid of; - with the force of command; go out; begone; away; off. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Away begone. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. Away; begone; prefix, beyond; exceeding; above. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. away from home; "they went out last night" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. outside of an enclosed space; "she is out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. outward from a reference point; "he kicked his legs out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. Without, not within: gone forth: abroad: in a state of discovery: in a state of exhaustion, extinction, etc.: completely: freely: forcibly: at a loss: unsheltered: uncovered. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. In a condition of issusnce, or as of having issued; on the outside; not in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Not in harmony or practise. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Not at home. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To the uttermost. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Without; not within; not at home; in a state of disclosure, or extinction, or being exhausted, or destitution; not in office; to the end; loudly; in an error; at a loss. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. On or to the outside; without; not at home; in a state of exhaustion; in a state of extinction; not in office; not in employment; to the end, as, hear me out; without restraint, as, "I dare laugh out"; not in the hands of the owner, as, "the lands are out upon lease"; with parts of clothes torn, as, out at the elbows; incurring loss, as, out of pocket. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. of a fire; being out or having grown cold; "threw his extinct cigarette into the stream"; "faint smoke from the extinguished candle"; "the fire is out"; "the quenched flames" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. knocked unconscious by a heavy blow Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. outer or outlying; "the out islands" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  33. no longer fashionable; "that style is out these days" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. out of power; especially having been unsuccessful in an election; "now the Democrats are out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  35. outside or external; "the out surface of a ship's hull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  36. directed outward or serving to direct something outward; "the out doorway"; "the out basket" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  37. (baseball) not allowed to continue to bat or run; "he was tagged out at second on a close play"; "he fanned out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  38. not in; or in or into the open; "has been out all day"; "out to lunch"; "the sun is out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  39. not worth considering as a possibility; "a picnic is out because of the weather" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  40. (baseball) a failure by a batter or runner to reach a base safely in baseball; "you only get 3 outs per inning" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  41. of a fire; being out or having grown cold; "threw his extinct cigarette into the stream"; "the fire is out" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  42. not allowed to continue to bat or run; "he was tagged out at second on a close play"; "he fanned out" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  43. In its original and strict sense, out means from the interior of something; beyond the limits or boundary of somethings; in a position or relation which is exterior to something; -- opposed to in or into. The something may be expressed after of, from, etc. (see Out of, below); or, if not expressed, it is implied; as, he is out; or, he is out of the house, office, business, etc.; he came out; or, he came out from the ship, meeting, sect, party, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. Away; abroad; off; from home, or from a certain, or a usual, place; not in; not in a particular, or a usual, place; as, the proprietor is out, his team was taken out. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. Beyond the limits of concealment, confinement, privacy, constraint, etc., actual of figurative; hence, not in concealment, constraint, etc., in, or into, a state of freedom, openness, disclosure, publicity, etc.; as, the sun shines out; he laughed out, to be out at the elbows; the secret has leaked out, or is out; the disease broke out on his face; the book is out. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. Beyond the limit of existence, continuance, or supply; to the end; completely; hence, in, or into, a condition of extinction, exhaustion, completion; as, the fuel, or the fire, has burned out. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. Beyond the bounds of what is true, reasonable, correct, proper, common, etc.; in error or mistake; in a wrong or incorrect position or opinion; in a state of disagreement, opposition, etc.; in an inharmonious relation. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. Not in the position to score in playing a game; not in the state or turn of the play for counting or gaining scores. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. Beyond possession, control, or occupation; hence, in, or into, a state of want, loss, or deprivation; - used of office, business, property, knowledge, etc.; as, the Democrats went out and the Whigs came in; he put his money out at interest. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. Away! be gone !-OUT OF COURSE, out of order. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  51. Not within; forth; abroad; beyond limits. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. Prefix denoting excess, going beyond, or superiority. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  53. Exterior. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for out?

Usage examples for out

  1. It is so much pleasanter out here. – Not Like Other Girls by Rosa N. Carey
  2. Seen the p'lice out your way? – A Little Bush Maid by Mary Grant Bruce
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