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Definitions of pad

  1. To travel slowly; to rob on foot. See Path. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To stuff with pads or padding; put up in pads; wear or use pads. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To travel upon foot; to tread. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To stuff; to furnish with a pad or padding. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To imbue uniformly with a mordant; as, to pad cloth. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To stuff, or line thickly, as a coat; to fill with useless words; as, to pad a story. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To stuff with anything soft: to fix colors in cloth:-pr.p. padding; pa.t. and pa.p. padded. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To stuff with anything soft. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. To travel heavily or slowly. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To rob on foot. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To wear a path by walking. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To walk heavily and slowly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To walk on foot: to rob on foot:-pr.p. padding; pa.t. and pa.p. padded. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To walk. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. add details to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. line or stuff with soft material; "pad a bra" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. To stuff with padding; to fix colours in cloth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. To travel slowly; to rob on foot. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. To stuff with padding; to impregnate cloth with a mordant. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. Padding. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. the foot or fleshy cushion-like underside of the toes of an animal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a usually thin flat mass of padding Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. the large floating leaf of an aquatic plant (as the water lily) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. a number of sheets of paper fastened together along one edge Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. walk heavily and firmly, as when weary, or through mud; "Mules plodded in a circle around a grindstone" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. A footpath; a road. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. An easy-paced horse; a padnag. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The act of robbing on the highway. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A kind of cushion for writing upon, or for blotting; esp., one formed of many flat sheets of writing paper, or layers of blotting paper; a block of paper. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A cushion used as a saddle without a tree or frame. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A stuffed guard or protection; esp., one worn on the legs of horses to prevent bruising. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A cushionlike thickening of the skin one the under side of the toes of animals. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A floating leaf of a water lily or similar plant. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A soft bag or cushion to relieve pressure, support a part, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A piece of timber fixed on a beam to fit the curve of the deck. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A measure for fish; as, sixty mackerel go to a pad; a basket of soles. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A robber that infests the road on foot; a highwayman; - usually called a footpad. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A soft cushion; a cushionlike part of anything; a block of sheets of paper; the floating leaf of some water plants. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. A thief on the high-road (more commonly FOOTPAD): a roadster, an easy-paced horse. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. Anything stuffed with a soft material: a soft saddle, cushion, etc.: a package of some soft material for writing upon. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. A small cushion. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. An elastic cushion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A flat packet of paper; tablet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A floating leaf, as of a water - lily. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. An easy-paced horse; a footpad; a robber that infests the road on foot. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. Anything stuffed with something soft, as a saddle, cushion, or bolster; a soft package for writing on. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. A robber who infests a road on foot, usually in the form foot-pad; an easy-paced horse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. A flat cushion; a soft saddle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. Padded. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for pad?

Usage examples for pad

  1. He remembered pushing, with a big leather pad on his forehead, at a gun stuck in deep mud, and that was before the Afghan War of 1842, and he had not then come to his full strength. – The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
  2. She sprang out of bed, caught up a pad of paper, and wrote hastily: It was all a mistake- I don't care for you at all- not a bit! – The Bent Twig by Dorothy Canfield
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