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Definitions of peel

  1. come off in flakes or thin small pieces; "The paint in my house is peeling off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the rind of a fruit or vegetable Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. British politician (1788-1850) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the tissue forming the hard outer layer (of e.g. a fruit) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. get undressed; "please don't undress in front of everybody!"; "She strips in front of strangers every night for a living" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. strip the skin off; "pare apples" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. A small tower, fort, or castle; a keep. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A spadelike implement, variously used, as for removing loaves of bread from a baker's oven; also, a T-shaped implement used by printers and bookbinders for hanging wet sheets of paper on lines or poles to dry. Also, the blade of an oar. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To plunder; to pillage; to rob. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To strip off the skin, bark, or rind of; to strip by drawing or tearing off the skin, bark, husks, etc.; to flay; to decorticate; as, to peel an orange. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To strip or tear off; to remove by stripping, as the skin of an animal, the bark of a tree, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The skin or rind; as, the peel of an orange. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To lose the skin, bark, or rind; to come off, as the skin, bark, or rind does; - often used with an adverb; as, the bark peels easily or readily. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To strip the outer covering from, as bark, rind, husk, etc.; to strip off. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To come off or strip. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Skin or rind. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. A small fortress. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. To strip off the skin or bark: to bare. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To come off, as the skin. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. The skin, rind, or bark. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. A small border fortress. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A baker's wooden shovel: a fire-shovel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To plunder: to pillage. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. Rind; skin; bark. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To come off, as skin. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To strip off the skin, rind, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To strip off the peel of; remove or be detached, as a rind or skin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Skin; rind; bark. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. The skin or rind. See Pell. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. A wooden shovel used by bakers; a fire-shovel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. A square fortress tower on the Scottish borders. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To strip off skin, bark, or rind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. The skin or rind of a fruit; the thin bark of a stick. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. To strip from fruit, & c., the skin, bark, or rind; to pare; to lose the skin or bark; to come off, as the skin. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. A flat wooden shovel for an oven; an instr. used in a printing-office for hanging up printed sheets to dry. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To lose the skin, bark, or rind; to come off, as the skin, bark, or rind does; -- often used with an adverb; as, the bark peels easily or readily. mso.anu.edu.au
  37. p[=e]l, v.t. to strip off the skin or bark: to bare.--v.i. to come off as the skin: to lose the skin: (slang) to undress.--n. the skin, rind, or bark: (print.) a wooden pole with short cross-piece for carrying printed sheets to the poles on which they are to be dried: the wash or blade of an oar--not the loom: a mark ([Peel mark]) for cattle, for persons who cannot write, &c.--adj. PEELED, stripped of skin, rind, or bark: plundered.--ns. PEEL'ER, one who peels, a plunderer; PEEL'ING, the act of stripping: that which is stripped off: (print.) the removing of the layers of a paper overlay, to get a lighter impression. [O. Fr. peler, to unskin--L. pil[=a]re, to deprive of hair--pilus, a hair; or pellis, a skin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. p[=e]l, n. a small Border fortress.--Also PEEL'-TOW'ER. [Pile.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. p[=e]l, n. a baker's wooden shovel: a fire-shovel. [O. Fr. pele--L. p[=a]la, a spade.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. p[=e]l, v.t. to plunder: to pillage. [Pill (v.).] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. (hist.). Small square tower built in 16th c. in border counties of England& Scotland. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. Shovel, esp. baker\'s for thrusting loaves &c. into oven. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. Strip the peel, rind, bark, &c., from (orange, potato, tree, &c.); take off (skin, peel, &c.); (archaic, from Isa. xviii. 2, perh. mistransl.) scattered& peeled (pillaged); (intr., of tree, animal body, &c.) become bare of bark, skin, &c., (of person, now slang) strip for exercise &c.; (n.) rind, outer coating, of fruit, candied p. (usu. of citron). Hence peeler Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. (Of bark, surface, &c.) come off or off like p. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. [Fr.] [Celt.] (Geog.) A stronghold Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  46. [Fr.] A broad iron shovel with a long wooden handle, used by bakers. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  47. [Fr.] A T-shaped piece of wood with a long handle, for hanging up the sheets of a book to dry, etc. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  48. n. The skin or rind of any thing. Cabinet Dictionary

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