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Definitions of petition

  1. reverent petition to a deity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. write a petition for something to somebody; request formally and in writing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a formal message requesting something that is submitted to an authority Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. A prayer; a supplication; an imploration; an entreaty; especially, a request of a solemn or formal kind; a prayer to the Supreme Being, or to a person of superior power, rank, or authority; also, a single clause in such a prayer. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A formal written request addressed to an official person, or to an organized body, having power to grant it; specifically (Law), a supplication to government, in either of its branches, for the granting of a particular grace or right; -- in distinction from a memorial, which calls certain facts to mind; also, the written document. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To make a prayer or request to; to ask from; to solicit; to entreat; especially, to make a formal written supplication, or application to, as to any branch of the government; as, to petition the court; to petition the governor. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To make a petition or solicitation. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A formal written request made to a court, asking for an order or ruling on a particular matter. For example, if you want to be appointed conservator for an elderly relative, you must file a petition with a court. See also complaint.
  9. An earnest request; a formal request; a paper containing a written request. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To solicit; entreat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. Petitioner. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A request: a prayer: a supplication. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To present a petition to: to supplicate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. Request; prayer. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To present a petition to; supplicate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To present a petition; request. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A prayer or formal request. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A request or prayer; a formal supplication from an inferior to a superior; the paper containing a supplication or solicitation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To make a request to; to solicit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. An asking or seeking; a solemn or formal solicitation made by one party to another; a paper or document containing a written request or supplication; a prayer, or a part of one, addressed to God; an earnest entreaty. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. To solicit earnestly; to supplicate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. A written address, embodying an application or prayer from the person or persons preferring it, to the power, body, or person to whom it is presented, for the exercise of his or their authority in the redress of some wrong, or the grant of some favor, privilege, or license. In practice. An application made to a court ex parte, or where there are no parties BL.LAW DICT. (2D ED.) thelawdictionary.org
  23. p[=e]-tish'un, n. a request generally from an inferior to a superior: a written request presented to a court of law, or to a body of legislators: a prayer: a supplication.--v.t. to present a petition to: to ask as a favour: to supplicate.--adj. PETIT'IONARY, offering or containing a petition: supplicatory.--ns. PETIT'IONER, one who offers a petition or prayer; PETIT'IONING, the act of presenting a petition: entreaty: solicitation; PETIT'IONIST.--adj. PET'ITORY, petitioning.--PETITIO PRINCIPII, the fallacy of begging the question--a taking for granted in argument of that which has yet to be proved. [Fr.,--L. petitio--pet[)e]re, petitum, to ask.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. Asking, supplication, request; formal written supplication from one or more persons to sovereign &c.; (Hist.) P. & Advice, Parliament\'s remonstrance to Cromwell, 1657, P. of Right, parliamentary declaration of rights& liberties of the people assented to by Charles I in 1628; (Law) kinds of formal written application to a court; (v.t.) make p. to (sovereign &c. for thing, to do); (v.i.) ask humbly (for thing, to be allowed to do &c.). Hence or cogn. petitionary a., petitioner n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. The Constitution prohibits Congress from making any law to abridge " the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." February 11, 1790, a petition signed by Franklin was offered to Congress praying the abolition of slavery, but it was unnoticed. Between 1830 and 1844 numerous petitions from abolitionists poured in. February 8, 1835, Henry L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, suggested that resolutions be adopted to the effect that Congress cannot constitutionally interfere with slavery in any of the States. The committee on these resolutions reported favorably and suggested that thereafter abolition petitions be laid on the table. These were adopted. John Quincy Adams opposed these "gag rules" during ten years, finally accomplishing their abolition in 1844. Dictionary of United States history
  26. n. [Latin] A prayer; a begging; a request; an entreaty, especially of a formal kind; supplication; memorial. Cabinet Dictionary

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