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Definitions of physics

  1. The science which treats of matter and energy, including mechanics, heat, light, electricity, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. Used as sing. (orig.) equivalent to PHYSICAL SCIENCE, i.e. the science of the order of nature: usually sig. (as distinguished from chemistry) study of matter and the general properties of matter and the general properties of matter as affected by energy-also called natural philosophy. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. The science which treats of the properties of matter, the laws of motion, and the phenomena of nature; natural philosophy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  4. The science of nature or natural objects. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. The science that treats of the phenomena and laws of matter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. The science of nature, or of the material system; natural philosophy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

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Usage examples for physics

  1. Sir Oliver Lodge, F. R. S., well- known among English men of science, and at the time Professor of Physics at Liverpool, describes the opening of the trance in very nearly the same words as Professor Richet in the remarkable report which he published in 1890 on the sittings he had with Mrs Piper. – Mrs. Piper & the Society for Psychical Research by Michael Sage
  2. But in mathematics, physics chemistry, all the matters in which it is impossible for a man to take another view because he is a Frenchman or a German- here we reach a haven of intellectual peace; and these calm waters are spreading over the world, in spite of the tempests. – The Unity of Civilization by Various
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