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Definitions of physiology

  1. processes and functions of an organism Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. The science which treats of the phenomena of living organisms; the study of the processes incidental to, and characteristic of, life. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. A treatise on physiology. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. The science that treats of the life of plants and animals; the study of life processes, especially of the work of the organs and tissues in the human body. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. The science of the functions of living beings-a branch of biology. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. PHYSIOLOGIC, PHYSIOLOGICAL. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. PHYSIOLOGIST. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. Science of the functions of living bodies. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. The science which treats of the organs of plants and animals and their functions. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. The science which treats of the vital actions or functions performed by the organs of plants and animals. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. The study of functions and activities of organisms. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

Usage examples for physiology

  1. If you study physiology and note the arrangement of the internal organs, you will very easily see that when the body is compressed in a sitting attitude there must be a hindrance to full and deep breathing. – What a Young Woman Ought to Know by Mary Wood-Allen
  2. In the same year as his Chouans appeared his Physiology of Marriage, a book of satire and caricature having a distinct stamp of his maturer manner. – Balzac by Frederick Lawton
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