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Definitions of pick

  1. harass with constant criticism; "Don't always pick on your little brother" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. attack with or as if with a pickaxe of ice or rocky ground, for example; "Pick open the ice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the act of choosing or selecting; "your choice of colors was unfortunate"; "you can take your pick" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the person or thing chosen or selected; "he was my pick for mayor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the best people or things in a group; "the cream of England's young men were killed in the Great War" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. look for and gather; "pick mushrooms"; "pick flowers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the yarn woven across the warp yarn in weaving Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. pilfer or rob; "pick pockets" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a basketball maneuver; obstructing an opponent with one's body; "he was called for setting an illegal pick" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a heavy iron tool with a wooden handle and a curved head that is pointed on both ends; "they used picks and sledges to break the rocks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a thin sharp implement used for picking; "he used a pick to clean dirt out of the cracks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a small thin device (of metal or plastic or ivory) used to pluck a stringed instrument Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. the quantity of a crop that is harvested; "he sent the first picking of berries to the market"; "it was the biggest peach pick in years" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. remove in small bits; "pick meat from a bone" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. select carefully from a group; "She finally picked her successor"; "He picked his way carefully" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. eat intermittently; take small bites of; "He pieced at the sandwich all morning"; "She never eats a full meal--she just nibbles" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. pull lightly but sharply with a plucking motion; "he plucked the strings of his mandolin" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. provoke; "pick a fight or a quarrel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. pay for something; "pick up the tab"; "pick up the burden of high-interest mortgages"; "foot the bill" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. completely; used as intensifiers; "clean forgot the appointment"; "I'm plumb (or plum) tuckered out" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. To throw; to pitch. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To peck at, as a bird with its beak; to strike at with anything pointed; to act upon with a pointed instrument; to pierce; to prick, as with a pin. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To separate or open by means of a sharp point or points; as, to pick matted wool, cotton, oakum, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To open (a lock) as by a wire. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To pull apart or away, especially with the fingers; to pluck; to gather, as fruit from a tree, flowers from the stalk, feathers from a fowl, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To remove something from with a pointed instrument, with the fingers, or with the teeth; as, to pick the teeth; to pick a bone; to pick a goose; to pick a pocket. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To trim. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To eat slowly, sparingly, or by morsels; to nibble. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To do anything nicely or carefully, or by attending to small things; to select something with care. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To steal; to pilfer. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. A pike or spike; the sharp point fixed in the center of a buckler. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Choice; right of selection; as, to have one's pick. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. That which would be picked or chosen first; the best; as, the pick of the flock. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A particle of ink or paper imbedded in the hollow of a letter, filling up its face, and occasioning a spot on a printed sheet. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. That which is picked in, as with a pointed pencil, to correct an unevenness in a picture. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To choose; to select; to separate as choice or desirable; to cull; as, to pick one's company; to pick one's way; - often with out. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To take up; esp., to gather from here and there; to collect; to bring together; as, to pick rags; - often with up; as, to pick up a ball or stones; to pick up information. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A sharp-pointed tool for picking; - often used in composition; as, a toothpick; a picklock. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A heavy iron tool, curved and sometimes pointed at both ends, wielded by means of a wooden handle inserted in the middle, - used by quarrymen, roadmakers, etc.; also, a pointed hammer used for dressing millstones. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. The blow which drives the shuttle, - the rate of speed of a loom being reckoned as so many picks per minute; hence, in describing the fineness of a fabric, a weft thread; as, so many picks to an inch. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. A heavy pointed iron tool with a wooden handle; a pickax; a wire or other sharp-pointed instrument; a blow with a pointed instrument; act of choosing; choice or selection; as, take your pick; the best of anything; as, the pick of the lot. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. To strike with a sharp instrument, or with the beak; pierce or peck; as, to pick a hole; open by an instrument; as, to pick a lock; lift: used with up; as, to pick up something fallen; pluck or gather; as, to pick berries; separate with the fingers; as, to pick rags; bring about intentionally; as, to pick a quarrel; choose or select; as, pick the best one; clean or clear of something, as, to pick a chicken; rob; as, to pick a pocket; pull or twitch the strings of; as, to pick a banjo. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To eat daintily; pilfer; to choose carefully. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. To prick with a sharp pointed instrument: to peck, as a bird: to pierce: to open with a pointed instrument, as a lock: to pluck or gather, as flowers, etc.: to separate from: to clean with the teeth: to gather: to choose: to select: to call: to seek, as a quarrel: to steal. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. To do anything nicely: to eat by morsels. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. Any sharp-pointed instrument: choice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. PICKER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. A pointed tool; choice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  49. To peck; open with a pointed tool; pluck; select. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. To strike with or as with a pick or point. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. To pluck; select; cull. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A tool with a pointed head. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. Right of selection; choice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. A quantity picked by hand. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. A sharp-pointed tool for digging; choice; right of selection; foul matter which collects on printing types. To pick up, to take up; to gather. To pick a hole in one's coat, to find fault. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To pluck with the fingers something that grows or adheres to another thing; to pull off or clean with the teeth, fingers, &c; to separate so as to loosen; to steal by taking out with the fingers; to choose or select; to strike with the bill, as a bird; to puncture; to open by a pointed instrument, as a lock. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. To eat slowly; to nibble. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. An iron tool pointed, used in digging; choice; selection; foul matter on type. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. To pluck, as fruit; to separate with the fingers; to pull off or clean; to select or choose; to take up; togather; to eat by morsels, as to pick a bone; to pierce; to strike with anything pointed; to open with an instr., as a lock; to strike with the bill; to rob; to do anything nicely or leisurely. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. To choose; to select; to separate as choice or desirable; to cull; as, to pick one's company; to pick one's way; -- often with out. mso.anu.edu.au
  61. To take up; esp., to gather from here and there; to collect; to bring together; as, to pick rags; -- often with up; as, to pick up a ball or stones; to pick up information. mso.anu.edu.au
  62. A sharp-pointed tool for picking; -- often used in composition; as, a toothpick; a picklock. mso.anu.edu.au
  63. A heavy iron tool, curved and sometimes pointed at both ends, wielded by means of a wooden handle inserted in the middle, -- used by quarrymen, roadmakers, etc.; also, a pointed hammer used for dressing millstones. mso.anu.edu.au
  64. The blow which drives the shuttle, -- the rate of speed of a loom being reckoned as so many picks per minute; hence, in describing the fineness of a fabric, a weft thread; as, so many picks to an inch. mso.anu.edu.au
  65. pik, v.t. to prick with a sharp-pointed instrument: to peck, as a bird: to pierce: to open with a pointed instrument, as a lock: to pluck or gather, as flowers, &c.: to separate or pull apart: to clean with the teeth: to gather: to choose: to select: to call: to seek, as a quarrel: to steal.--v.i. to do anything carefully: to eat by morsels.--n. any sharp-pointed instrument, esp. for loosening and breaking up hard soil, &c.: a picklock: foul matter collecting on printing-types, &c.: right or opportunity of first choice.--n. PICK'-CHEESE, the blue titmouse: the fruit of the mallow.--adj. PICKED (pikt), selected, hence the choicest or best: having spines or prickles, sharp-pointed.--ns. PICK'EDNESS; PICK'ER, one who picks or gathers up: one who removes defects from and finishes electrotype plates: a pilferer; PICK'ING, the act of picking, selecting, gathering, pilfering: that which is left to be picked: dabbing in stone-working: the final finishing of woven fabrics by removing burs, &c.: removing defects from electrotype plates; PICK'LOCK, an instrument for picking or opening locks; PICK'-ME-UP, a stimulating drink; PICK'POCKET, one who picks or steals from other people's pockets; PICK'-PURSE, one who steals the purse or from the purse of another.--adj. PICK'SOME, given to picking and choosing.--n. PICK'-THANK, an officious person who does what he is not desired to do in order to gain favour: a flatterer: a parasite.--v.t. to gain favour by unworthy means.--PICK A HOLE IN ONE'S COAT, to find fault with one; PICK A QUARREL, to find an occasion of quarrelling; PICK AT, to find fault with; PICK FAULT, to seek occasions of fault-finding; PICK OAKUM, to make oakum by untwisting old ropes; PICK OFF, to aim at and kill or wound, as with a rifle; PICK ONE'S WAY, to move carefully; PICK OUT, to make out: to mark with spots of colour, &c.; PICK TO PIECES, to tear asunder: to damage, as character; PICK UP, to improve gradually: to gain strength bit by bit: to take into a vehicle, or into one's company: to get as if by chance.--adj. gathered together by chance. [Celt., as Gael. pioc, to pick, W. pigo; cf. Pike.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  66. Tool consisting of iron bar usu. curved with point at one end& point or chisel-edge at other, with wooden handle passing through middle perpendicularly, used for breaking up hard ground &c.; instrument for picking; TOOTHP. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. Break surface of (ground &c.) with or as with pick; make (hole &c.) thus; (fig.) p. HOLEs in; probe (teeth &c.) with pointed instrument to remove extraneous matter; clear (bone, carcass) of adherent flesh, pluck, gather, (flower, fruit, &c.) from stalk &c.; (of birds) take up (grains &c.) in bill; (of persons) eat (food, or meal, or abs.) in small bits, (colloq.) eat (t. & i.); select carefully, as p. one\'s words, way, steps, p. & choose, select fastidiously; p. (contrive) a quarrel with; p. (person\'s) pocket, steal its contents; (intr.) p. & steal, pilfer; p. a lock, open it (esp. with intent to rob) with pointed instrument, skeleton key, &c.; pull asunder, esp. p. oakum; p. to pieces, pull asunder, (fig.) criticize (person &c.) hostilely; p. off, pluck off, (also) shoot (persons &c.) deliberately one by one; p. out, select, distinguish from surrounding objects, relieve (ground colour with another), make out (meaning of passage &c.), play (tune) by ear on piano &c.; p. up, break up (ground &c.) with pick, lay hold of& take up, raise oneself from a fall &c., gain, acquire (livelihood, profit, tricks, information), take (person or thing overtaken) along with one, esp. train stops to p. up passengers, regain (lost path &c., flesh, spirit), (intr.) recover health, make acquaintance with; picklock, person who picks locks, instrument used for this; p.-me-up, stimulating drink (also fig.); pickpocket, one who steals from pockets; pick-thank (archaic), sycophant; p.-up, picking up (esp. of ball in cricket). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Picking; selection; the best part of. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. n. A sharp-pointed tool; especially, an iron tool tapering to a point from a heavy mass or head, used for loosening and breaking up hard earth, ground, stones, &c.;—a small pointed instrument for cleansing the teeth; tooth-pick;—pointed iron instrument for dressing stone;—choice; right of selection. Cabinet Dictionary

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