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Definitions of pile

  1. a nuclear reactor that uses controlled nuclear fission to generate energy Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "it must have cost plenty" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a collection of objects laid on top of each other Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. battery consisting of voltaic cells arranged in series; the earliest electric battery devised by Volta Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. arrange in stacks; "heap firewood around the fireplace"; "stack your books up on the shelves" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. press tightly together or cram; "The crowd packed the auditorium" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the yarn (as in a rug or velvet) that stands up from the weave Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a column of wood or steel or concrete that is driven into the ground to provide support for a structure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. informal: a large sum of money Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. place or lay as if in a pile; "The teacher piled work on the students until the parents protested" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the yarn (as in a rug or velvet or corduroy) that stands up from the weave; "for uniform color and texture tailors cut velvet with the pile running the same direction" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. fine soft dense hair (as the fine short hair of cattle or deer or the wool of sheep or the undercoat of certain dogs) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. a large sum of money (especially as pay or profit); "she made a bundle selling real estate"; "they sank megabucks into their new house" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. A hair; hence, the fiber of wool, cotton, and the like; also, the nap when thick or heavy, as of carpeting and velvet. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A covering of hair or fur. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The head of an arrow or spear. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A large stake, or piece of timber, pointed and driven into the earth, as at the bottom of a river, or in a harbor where the ground is soft, for the support of a building, a pier, or other superstructure, or to form a cofferdam, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. One of the ordinaries or subordinaries having the form of a wedge, usually placed palewise, with the broadest end uppermost. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A mass of things heaped together; a heap; as, a pile of stones; a pile of wood. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A mass formed in layers; as, a pile of shot. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A funeral pile; a pyre. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A large building, or mass of buildings. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Same as Fagot, n., 2. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals, as copper and zinc, laid up with disks of cloth or paper moistened with acid water between them, for producing a current of electricity; -- commonly called Volta's pile, voltaic pile, or galvanic pile. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The reverse of a coin. See Reverse. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; - often with up; as, to pile up wood. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A large beam driven into the ground to make a firm foundation; a mass or heap; as, a pile of sand; colloquially, a great quantity; a collection; a large building; nap of cloth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To throw into a heap; to collect and arrange; as, to pile bricks; accumulate or collect; as, to pile up wealth; build; drive beams into. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To form a mass or heap; collect. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. A series of plates of two different metals imposed alternately one on the other separated by a sheet of cloth or paper moistened with a dilute acid solution, used to produce a current of electricity; a battery. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  33. An individual hemorrhoidal tumor. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  34. A roundish mass: a heap: combustibles for burning, esp. dead bodies: a large building: a heap of shot or shell: (electricity) a form of battery. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. To lay in a pile or heap: to collect in a mass: to heap up: to fill above the brim. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. A pillar: a large stake driven into the earth to support foundations. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. To drive piles into. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  38. A hairy surface: the nap on cloth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. A heap; large building; large stake driven into the earth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To gather into a pile; accumulate; amass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A quantity heaped together; a heap. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Any great structure. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A heavy timber driven into the earth to form a foundation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A massive building. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Hair collectively; fur; raised surface on velvet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A heap; a mass or collection of things piled up, or of combustibles for burning a dead body; a large building or an edifice; a series of plates so arranged as to produce a current. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. A large stake driven into the earth to support a building. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. The nap or fine hairy substance on the surface of cloth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. To lay in a heap or pile; to collect together; to amass. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. A large stake or piece of timber driven into the earth to support the foundation of a building or the pier of a bridge; one side of a coin-so called from the punch used in stamping the figures; the arms side of a coin, as distinguished from the head, which was formerly marked by a cross, hence the term cross and pile, as a name for money; in her., one of the lesser ordinaries having the form of a wedge. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. A large building or mass of buildings; a heap of a roundish elevated form; a heap; an accumulation. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. To collect or gather together in a heap; to accumulate; to fill above the brim or top. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. Hairy surface; nap. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; -- often with up; as, to pile up wood. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. p[=i]l, n. a roundish mass: a heap of separate objects: combustibles, esp. for burning dead bodies: a large building: a heap of shot or shell: (elect.) a form of battery consisting of a number of dissimilar metal plates laid in pairs one above another, with an acid solution between them: (slang) a large amount of money: a fortune.--v.t. to lay in a pile or heap: to collect in a mass: to heap up: to fill above the brim.--n. P[=I]'LER, one who forms into a heap.--PILE ARMS, to place three muskets with fixed bayonets so that the butts remain firm, the muzzles close together pointing obliquely--also Stack arms. [Fr.,--L. p[)i]la, a ball.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. p[=i]l, n. a pillar: a large stake driven into the earth to support foundations: a pyramidal figure in a heraldic bearing.--v.t. to drive piles into.--ns. PILE'-DRIV'ER, PILE'-EN'GINE, an engine for driving down piles; PILE'-DWELL'ING, a dwelling built on piles, a lake-dwelling; PILE'WORK, work or foundations made of piles; PILE'-WORM, a worm found eating into the timber of piles and ships: the teredo. [A.S. píl--L. p[=i]la, a pillar.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. p[=i]l, n. hair, fur: the nap on cloth, esp. if regular and closely set.--v.t. to furnish with pile, to make shaggy.--adj. PILE'-WORN, worn threadbare. [O. Fr. peil, poil--L. p[)i]lus, a hair.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. [Latin] An aggregation of superimposed similar elements, especially for generating electricity; a battery, particularly one composed of numerous small metallic discs ( Voltaic p.). Thermo-electric p., an aggregation of fine metallic bars soldered together, which, on exposure to heat, generate a current of electricity acting upon an index. The movements of the latter register with the greatest delicacy the amount of heat. na
  59. Pointed stake or post; heavy beam driven vertically into bed of river &c. as support for bridge &c.; p. -driver, machine for driving pp.; (v.t.) furnish with pp., drive pp. into. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Heap of things laid more or less regularly upon one another; (funeral) p., heap of combustibles on which corpse is burnt; (colloq.) heap of money, fortune, as make a p., make one\'s p. (as much as one wants); lofty mass of buildings; series of plates of dissimilar metals laid one upon another alternately for producing electric current. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. Heap up (often up, on); p. arms, place (usu. four) rifles with butts on ground& muzzles together in pyramidal form so as to be readily available; (colloq.) p. up (or on) the agony, intensify painful description &c., p. it on, exaggerate; load (table &c. with). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  62. (archaic). Reverse of coin; cross or p., heads or tails. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. Soft hair, down, wool of sheep; nap on cloth, esp. on velvet, plush, &c., or on carpet, as two, three, -p. carpet. Hence pily a. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  64. (Pl.) haemorrhoids, disease marked by tumours of veins of lower rectum; (sing.) such tumour; pilewort, lesser celandine (from reputed efficacy against pp.). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  65. See battery. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  66. See hemorrhoid. In this connection it is generally used in the plural, Appleton's medical dictionary.
  67. [Fr.] The nap of cloth, velvet, etc. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  68. [L.] (Her.) A wedge shaped ordinary formed by lines drawn from the dexter and sinister chief to the middle base. See Escutcheon. Swords or other charges arranged in this shape are said to be borne in pile. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  69. n. [French, Latin, Greek] A roundish or elevated mass or collection of things; a heap;—a collection of combustibles for burning a dead body;—a heap of balls or shot raised in the form of a pyramid;—a large building or mass of buildings;—a vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals, with disks of cloth or paper between them moistened with acid water for producing a current of electricity. Cabinet Dictionary
  70. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Latin] A piece of timber pointed and driven into the earth for the support of a building, a bridge, or the like. Cabinet Dictionary
  71. n. [Latin] The fibre of wool, cotton, and the like; hence, the nap. Cabinet Dictionary

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