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Definitions of plant

  1. set up or lay the groundwork for; "establish a new department" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. fix or set securely or deeply; "He planted a knee in the back of his opponent"; "The dentist implanted a tooth in the gum" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a living organism lacking the power of locomotion Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. put firmly in the mind; "Plant a thought in the students' minds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. buildings for carrying on industrial labor; "they built a large plant to manufacture automobiles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. place into a river; "plant fish" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. something planted secretly for discovery by another; "the police used a plant to trick the thieves"; "he claimed that the evidence against him was a plant" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an actor situated in the audience whose acting is rehearsed but seems spontaneous to the audience Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. place something or someone in a certain position in order to secretly observe or deceive; "Plant a spy in Moscow"; "plant bugs in the dissident's apartment" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. put or set (seeds or seedlings) into the ground; "Let's plant flowers in the garden" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. A vegetable; an organized living being, generally without feeling and voluntary motion, and having, when complete, a root, stem, and leaves, though consisting sometimes only of a single leafy expansion, or a series of cellules, or even a single cellule. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A bush, or young tree; a sapling; hence, a stick or staff. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The whole machinery and apparatus employed in carrying on a trade or mechanical business; also, sometimes including real estate, and whatever represents investment of capital in the means of carrying on a business, but not including material worked upon or finished products; as, the plant of a foundry, a mill, or a railroad. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A plan; an artifice; a swindle; a trick. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An oyster which has been bedded, in distinction from one of natural growth. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A young oyster suitable for transplanting. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To put in the ground and cover, as seed for growth; as, to plant maize. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To set in the ground for growth, as a young tree, or a vegetable with roots. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To furnish, or fit out, with plants; as, to plant a garden, an orchard, or a forest. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To engender; to generate; to set the germ of. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To furnish with a fixed and organized population; to settle; to establish; as, to plant a colony. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To introduce and establish the principles or seeds of; as, to plant Christianity among the heathen. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To set firmly; to fix; to set and direct, or point; as, to plant cannon against a fort; to plant a standard in any place; to plant one's feet on solid ground; to plant one's fist in another's face. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To set up; to install; to instate. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To perform the act of planting. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. Any vegetable organism; a sprout or sapling; the tools, machinery, fixtures, and sometimes buildings, of any trade or business; as, a manufacturing plant; the equipment of an institution, as a college of hospital. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To put into the ground for growth; as, to plant seed; to provide or prepare with seeds, roots, etc.; as, to plant a garden; fix in the mind; establish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. A sprout: any vegetable production: a child: the tools or materials of any trade or business. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To put into the ground for growth: to furnish with plants: to set in the mind: to establish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. A vegetable; machinery and outfit of a manufactory. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To set in the ground; establish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To set in the ground for growth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. To supply (ground) with plants or seeds. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. To sow seeds, or set plants. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A vegetable growth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. The appliances required for a factory or other institution. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Any vegetable production; a sapling; the fixtures, machinery, tools, &c., necessary to carry on any business. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To set or put in the ground for growth; to furnish with plants; to set firmly; to fix; to settle; to set and direct. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. An organised living body destitute of sensation; a small vegetable; a herb or shrub; the tools necessary to any trade; the stock, fixtures, &c., necessary to carry on any large concern, as railway plant. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. To put or set in the ground for growth; to set that it may increase, as the germ of anything; to set firmly; to fix; to settle; to fill or adorn with plants. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. The fixtures, tools, machinery, and apparatus which are necessary to carry on a trade or business. Wharton. Southern Bell Tel. Co. v. D'Alemberte, 39 Fla. 25, 21 South. 570; Sloss-Sheffield Steel Co. v. Mobley, 139 Ala. 425, 30 South. 181; Maxwell v. Wilmington Dental Mfg. Co. (C. C.) 77 Fed. 941. thelawdictionary.org
  42. plant, n. a something living and growing, fixed on the ground and drawing food therefrom by means of its root, and developing into a stem, leaves, and seed: a sprout: any vegetable production: the tools or material of any trade or business: (slang) a trick, dodge, hidden plunder.--v.t. to put into the ground for growth: to furnish with plants: to set in the mind, implant: to establish.--v.i. to set shoots in the ground.--adj. PLANT'ABLE.--ns. PLANT'AGE (Shak.), plants in general, or the vegetable kingdom; PLANT[=A]'TION, a place planted: a wood or grove: (U.S.) a large estate: a colony: act or process of introduction: (Milt.) the act of planting; PLANT'ER, one who plants or introduces: the owner of a plantation; PLANT'-HOUSE, a garden structure designed for the protection and cultivation of the plants of warmer climates than our own; PLANT'ICLE, a young plant; PLANT'ING, the act of setting in the ground for growth: the art of forming plantations of trees: a plantation.--adj. PLANT'LESS, destitute of vegetation.--ns. PLANT'LET, a little plant; PLANT'-LOUSE, a small homopterous insect which infests plants; PLANT'ULE, the embryo of a plant. [A.S. plante (Fr. plante)--L. planta, a shoot, a plant.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  43. Member of the vegetable kingdom (often restricted to the smaller pp., excluding trees and shrubs); crop; growth, as in p., growing, lose p., die off, miss p., fail to spring from seed; mode of planting oneself, pose; fixtures, implements, machinery, &c., used in industrial process, (fig.) machinery of intellectual work &c.; (slang) planned swindle or burglary, hoax; (slang) detective, picket of these; p.-louse, kinds of insect that infest pp., esp. aphis. Hence plantlet n., plantlike a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. Place (tree, shoot, bulb, seed, crop, &c.) in ground that it may take root& grow; deposit (young fish, spawn, oysters) in river &c.; p. out, transfer (plant) from pot or frame to open ground, set out (seedlings) at intervals; fix firmly (in, on, ground &c.); station (person), esp. as spy; p. oneself, take up a position; establish, found, (community, city, church); settle (person) in a place as colonist &c.; cause (idea &c.) to take root in (mind); furnish (land with plants, district with settlers, &c.); deliver (blow, thrust) with definite aim; (slang) conceal (stolen goods &c.); (slang) place (gold dust, ore) in mining claim to encourage prospective buyer, cf. SALT v.; (slang) devise (fraudulent scheme); abandon, as there I was, fairly planted. Hence plantable a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. n. [Latin, Anglo-Saxon] A vegetable; an organic body having a root, stem, and leaves, and propagating itself by seed; herb; shrub; tree, &c.;—a sapling;—a child; a descendant; an inhabitant of a country;—the sole of the foot;—a fraudulent contrivance; deceptive trick;—the fixtures and tools necessary to carry on any trade or mechanical business. Cabinet Dictionary

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