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Definitions of post

  1. mark or expose as infamous; "She was branded a loose woman" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the system whereby messages are transmitted via the post office; "the mail handles billions of items every day"; "he works for the United States mail service"; "in England they call mail `the post'" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any particular collection of letters or packages that is delivered; "your mail is on the table"; "is there any post for me?"; "she was opening her post" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. cause to be directed or transmitted to another place; "send me your latest results"; "I'll mail you the paper when it's written" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. military installation at which a body of troops is stationed; "this military post provides an important source of income for the town nearby"; "there is an officer's club on the post" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. enter on a public list Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the delivery and collection of letters and packages; "it came by the first post"; "if you hurry you'll catch the post" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position; "he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a pole or stake set up to mark something (as the start or end of a race track); "a pair of posts marked the goal"; "the corner of the lot was indicated by a stake" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the position where someone (as a guard or sentry) stands or is assigned to stand; "a soldier manned the entrance post"; "a sentry station" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. for example, of records, in sports Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. assign to a station Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. put up; "post a sign"; "post a warning at the dump" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. mark with a stake; "stake out the path" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. United States manufacturer of breakfast cereals and Postum (1854-1914) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. United States female author who wrote a book and a syndicated newspaper column on etiquette (1872-1960) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. United States aviator who in 1933 made the first solo flight around the world (1899-1935) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. publicize with, or as if with, a poster; "I'll post the news on the bulletin board" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. display, as of records in sports games Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. affix in a public place or for public notice; "post a warning" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. ride Western style and bob up and down in the saddle in in rhythm with a horse's trotting gait Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. transfer (entries) from one account book to another Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. assign to a post; put into a post; "The newspaper posted him in Timbuktu" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. A pole or pillar, carved and painted with a series of totemic symbols, set up before the house of certain Indian tribes of the northwest coast of North America, esp. Indians of the Koluschan stock. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Hired to do what is wrong; suborned. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. A piece of timber, metal, or other solid substance, fixed, or to be fixed, firmly in an upright position, especially when intended as a stay or support to something else; a pillar; as, a hitching post; a fence post; the posts of a house. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. The doorpost of a victualer's shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a debt. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. The place at which anything is stopped, placed, or fixed; a station. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. A station, or one of a series of stations, established for the refreshment and accommodation of travelers on some recognized route; as, a stage or railway post. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. A military station; the place at which a soldier or a body of troops is stationed; also, the troops at such a station. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. The piece of ground to which a sentinel's walk is limited. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. A messenger who goes from station; an express; especially, one who is employed by the government to carry letters and parcels regularly from one place to another; a letter carrier; a postman. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. An established conveyance for letters from one place or station to another; especially, the governmental system in any country for carrying and distributing letters and parcels; the post office; the mail; hence, the carriage by which the mail is transported. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. Haste or speed, like that of a messenger or mail carrier. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. One who has charge of a station, especially of a postal station. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. A station, office, or position of service, trust, or emolument; as, the post of duty; the post of danger. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. A size of printing and writing paper. See the Table under Paper. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. To attach to a post, a wall, or other usual place of affixing public notices; to placard; as, to post a notice; to post playbills. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. To hold up to public blame or reproach; to advertise opprobriously; to denounce by public proclamation; as, to post one for cowardice. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. To enter (a name) on a list, as for service, promotion, or the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. To assign to a station; to set; to place; as, to post a sentinel. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. To carry, as an account, from the journal to the ledger; as, to post an account; to transfer, as accounts, to the ledger. Newage Dictionary DB
  44. To place in the care of the post; to mail; as, to post a letter. Newage Dictionary DB
  45. To inform; to give the news to; to make (one) acquainted with the details of a subject; -- often with up. Newage Dictionary DB
  46. To travel with post horses; figuratively, to travel in haste. Newage Dictionary DB
  47. To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the horse, esp. in trotting. Newage Dictionary DB
  48. With post horses; hence, in haste; as, to travel post. Newage Dictionary DB
  49. A prefix signifying behind, back, after; as, postcommissure, postdot, postscript. Newage Dictionary DB
  50. A piece of timber, etc., set upright, usually to support something else; system of carrying and delivering letters; the mail; place, station, situation, or office; a military station. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. To fasten, as a notice, to a wall, etc.; to make known by means of notices fastened to a wall, etc.; to send by mail; in bookkeeping, to transfer an entry or item from journal or day book to ledger; to inform fully. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  52. To travel with speed; as, to post o'er land and sea. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  53. Speedily: post card, a private card, as a picture, which can be sent through the mail by the affixing of a postage stamp. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  54. A prefix to words derived from Latin roots, noting after, behind, or posterior, corresponding to Greek, meta-. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  55. A piece of timber fixed in the ground, generally as a support to something else: a pillar. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  56. To fix on or to a post, that is, in a public place: to expose to public reproach. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  57. A fixed place, as a military station: a fixed place or stage on a road: an office: one who travels by stages, esp. carrying letters, etc.: a public letter carrier: an established system of conveying letters: a size of writing-paper, double that of common note-paper. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  58. To set or station: to put in the post-office: (book-k.) to transfer to the ledger. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  59. To travel with posthorses, or with speed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  60. With posthorses: with speed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  61. Piece of timber fixed in the ground; station; office; letter carrier; mail. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  62. To station; put in the mail; enter in the ledger. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  63. to travel with speed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  64. To put up in some public place. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. To assign to a post position or place. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. To mail. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. To transfer (items or accounts) to the ledger. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. Poster. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. An upright piece of timber or other material used as a support. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  70. A fixed place or station; office; employment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  71. The mail system; a postman; messenger. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  72. By post-horses; rapidly; as, to travel post. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  73. Behind or after; opposed to ante-; as, postscript. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  74. Latin prefix signifying after, behind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  75. Swiftly; with dispatch. To ride post, to be employed to carry despatches. To travel post, to travel with post-horses. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  76. A piece of timber set upright, usually larger than a stake, and intended to support something. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  77. A fixed place or station; a military station; a stage; an office or employment; a messenger or a carrier of letters; an established system of letter-carrying; the mail; a size of paper twice that of ordinary note-paper. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  78. To fix to a post; to stick up, as a bill; to expose to public reproach. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  79. To station; to forward a letter by the post-office; to carry accounts to the ledger. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  80. A piece of timber placed upright, generally as a support for something else; a station for soldiers; a place or situation; the station of duty; employment; a messenger who carries letters regularly from place to place; a quick or speedy manner of travelling; the mail; a size of printing and writing paper; a miner's or quarryman's term for any compact stratum of sandstone or lime-stone. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  81. To travel with speed, as by relays of horses; to send with speed; to place; to station; to fix; to assign; to advertise by putting a placard on a wall or a post; to place letters in the post-office; in book-keeping, to carry the entries from other books to the ledger. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  82. Speedy, as by post. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  83. In haste; hastily. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  84. A common prefix, signifying behind; after; afterwards; subsequent. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  85. 1. Probably, as Gesenius argues, the door-case of a door, including the lintel and side posts. The posts of the doors of the temple were of olive wood. ( 1 Kings 6:33 ) 2. A courier or carrier of messages, used among other places in ( Job 9:25 ) biblestudytools.com
  86. Lat. After; occurring in a report or a text-book, is used to send the reader to a subsequent part of the book. thelawdictionary.org
  87. A runner, or courier, for the rapid transmission of letters, etc. ( 2 Chronicles 30:6 ; Esther 3:13 Esther 3:15 ; Esther 8:10 Esther 8:14 ; Job 9:25 ; Jeremiah 51:31 ). Such messengers were used from very early times. Those employed by the Hebrew kings had a military character ( 1 Samuel 22:17 ; 2 Kings 10:25 , "guard," marg. "runners"). The modern system of postal communication was first established by Louis XI. of France in A.D. 1464. biblestudytools.com
  88. This word sometimes also is used for lintel or threshold ( Isaiah 6:4 ). These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Post". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  89. p[=o]st, n. a piece of timber fixed in the ground, generally as a support to something else: a pillar.--v.t. to fix on or to a post, or to any conspicuous position, in a public place: to expose to public reproach, to placard as having failed in an examination, &c.--n. POST'ER, one who posts bills: a large printed bill or placard for posting.--FROM PILLAR TO POST (see PILLAR). [A.S. post--L. postis, a doorpost--pon[)e]re, to place.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  90. p[=o]st, n. a fixed place, as a military station: a fixed place or stage on a road: an office: one who travels by stages, esp. carrying letters, &c.: a public letter-carrier: an established system of conveying letters: (Shak.) a post-horse: (Shak.) haste: a size of writing-paper, double that of common note-paper (so called from the water-mark, a postman's horn).--v.t. to set or station: to put in the post-office: (book-k.) to transfer from the journal to the ledger: to supply with necessary information, as to post up (cf. Well posted up).--v.i to travel with post-horses, or with speed.--adv. with posthorses: with speed.--ns. POST'AGE, the act of going by post: journey: money paid for conveyance of letters, &c., by post or mail; POST'AGE-STAMP, an adhesive stamp for affixing to letters to show that the postal charge has been paid.--adj. POST'AL, of or pertaining to the mail-service.--ns. POST'-BAG, a mail-bag; POST'-BILL, a way-bill of the letters sent from a post-office; POST'BOY, a boy that rides posthorses, or who carries letters; POST'-CARD, a stamped card on which a message may be sent by post; POST'-CHAISE, POST'-CHAR'IOT, a chaise or carriage with four wheels let for hire for the conveyance of those who travel with posthorses.--v.i. POST'-CHAISE, to travel by post-chaise.--ns. POST'-DAY, the day on which the post or mail arrives or departs; POST'ER, one who travels by post: (Shak.) a courier: one who travels expeditiously: a posthorse.--adj. POST'-FREE, delivered by the post without payment.--n. POSTHASTE', haste in travelling like that of a post.--adj. speedy: immediate.--adv. with haste or speed.--ns. POST'-HORN, a postman's horn: a horn blown by the driver of a mail-coach; POST'HORSE, a horse kept for posting; POST'HOUSE, a house where horses are kept for the use of parties posting: a post-office; POST'MAN, a post or courier: a letter-carrier; POST'MARK, the mark or stamp put upon a letter at a post-office showing the time and place of reception and delivery; POST'MASTER, the manager or superintendent of a post-office: one who supplies posthorses: at Merton College, Oxford, a scholar who is supported on the foundation; POST'MASTER-GEN'ERAL, the minister who is the chief officer of the post-office department; POST'-OFF'ICE, an office for receiving and transmitting letters by post: a department of the government which has charge of the reception and conveyance of letters.--adj. POST'-PAID, having the postage paid, as a letter.--ns. POST'-TIME, the time for the despatch or for the delivery of letters; POST'-TOWN, a town with a post-office.--POSTAL NOTE, a note for a fixed designated sum issued by a postmaster, payable at any office; POSTAL ORDER, an order issued by the postmaster authorising the holder to receive at some particular post-office payment of the sum marked on it. [Fr. poste--L. pon[)e]re, positum, to place.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  91. p[=o]st, adv. and prep. after, behind--in compounds as Post-abdominal, Post-anal, Post-axial, Post-brachial, Post-canonical, Post-clavicle, Post-embryonic, &c.--adj. POST'-CLASS'ICAL, after those Greek and Latin writers styled classical, but before the medieval.--n. POST'-COMMUN'ION, the part of the eucharistic office after the act of communion.--adj. succeeding communion.--v.t. POSTDATE', to date after the real time.--n. a date on a letter later than the real date on which it was written.--adjs. POST'-DIL[=U]'VIAL, POST'-DIL[=U]'VIAN, being or happening after the deluge.--ns. POST'-DIL[=U]'VIAN, one who has lived since the deluge; POST'-EN'TRY, an additional entry of merchandise at a custom-house.--adjs. POST'-EXIL'IC, POST'-EXIL'IAN, after the time of the Babylonian captivity of the Jews.--ns. POST'-EXIST'ENCE, future existence; POST'FIX, a letter, syllable, or word fixed to or put after another word, an affix.--v.t. POSTFIX', to add to the end of another word.--adjs. POST'-GL[=A]'CIAL, after the glacial epoch; POST'-GRAD'UATE, belonging to study pursued after graduation; POST'-MERID'IAN, coming after the sun has crossed the meridian: in the afternoon (written P.M.).--n. POST'-MILLEN[=A]'RIAN, one who believes in post-millennialism.--adj. POST'-MILLENN'IAL.--n. POST'-MILLENN'IALISM, the doctrine that the second coming of Christ will follow the millennium.--adj. POST'-MOR'TEM, after death.--n. a post-mortem examination.--adjs. POST'-N[=A]'TAL, after birth; POST'-N[=I]'CENE, after the first general council at Nicæa in 325 A.D.--n. POST'-NOTE, a note issued by a bank, payable at some future time.--adj. POST'-NUP'TIAL, being or happening after marriage.--ns. POST'-[=O]'BIT, a bond or security given by heirs and others entitled to reversionary interests, whereby in consideration of a sum of money presently advanced, the debtor binds himself to pay a much larger sum after the death of some person, or of himself; POST'-POSI'TION, the state of being put back or out of the regular place: (gram.) a word or particle placed after a word--opp. to a preposition, which is placed before.--adjs. POST'-POS'ITIVE; POST'-REMOTE', more remote in subsequent time or order; POST'-TER'TIARY, more recent than the Tertiary.--n. the most recent geological division. [L.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  92. Stout piece of timber usu. cylindrical or square& of considerable length placed vertically as support in building; stake, stout pole, for various purposes; BED, DOOR, GOAL, KING, LAMP, SIGN, -p.; starting, winning, -p., p. that marks starting, finishing, point in race; thick compact stratum of sandstone &c.; vertical mass of coal left as support in mine; (v.t.) stick (paper &c., usu. up) to p. or in prominent place; make known, advertise, (fact, thing, person); (in colleges) place in list that is posted up the names of (unsuccessful students); publish name of (ship) as overdue or missing; placard (wall &c.) with bills. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  93. (Hist.) one of a series of men stationed with horses along roads at intervals, the duty of each being to ride forward with letters to next stage; (Hist.) courier, letter-carrier, mail-cart; a single dispatch of letters, letters so dispatched; letters taken from p.-office or pillar-box on one occasion, as I missed the morning p.; letters delivered at one house on one occasion, as the p. has come, had a heavy p. to-day; official conveyance of letters, parcels, &c., as send it by p.; GENERAL, PARCEL-, PENNY, p.; p. office or postal letter box, as take it to the p.; by return of p., (Hist.) by same courier who brought the dispatch, (mod.) by next mail in opposite direction; (as title of newspaper) Morning P. &c.; sizes (about 20 X 16 in.) & kinds of writing-paper; (adv.) with p.-horses, express, with haste, as ride p.; p.-bag, mail-bag; p.-boat, mail-boat, (also) boat conveying travellers between certain points; p.-boy, letter-carrier, (also) postilion; postcard, card of regulation size for conveyance by p.; p.-chaise (Hist.) travelling carriage hired from stage to stage or drawn by horses so hired; p.-free, carried free of charge by p., or with postage prepaid; p.-haste, n. & adv. (archaic), (with) great expedition; p.-horse (kept at inns &c. for use of p. or travellers); postman, one who delivers or collects letters; postmark, (n.) official mark stamped on letter, esp. one giving place, date, & hour of dispatch or arrival, & serving to deface stamp, (v.t.) mark (envelope &c.) with this; postmaster, official in charge of a p. office, p.-m. general, administrative head of postal service; postmastership, office of postmaster; postmistress, woman in charge of p. office; p. office, public department for conveyance of letters &c. by p., house or shop where postal business is carried on (GENERAL P.O., p.-o. ORDER, savings-bank, see SAVE); p.-paid, on which postage has been paid; p.-town (with p. office, esp. one that is not sub-office of another). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  94. Travel with relays of horses; travel with haste, hurry; put (letter &c.) into post office or letter-box for transmission; (Bookkeep.) carry (entry) from auxiliary book to more formal one, esp. from day-book or journal to ledger, (also p. up) complete (ledger &c.) thus, (fig., also p. up) supply (person) with full information. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  95. Place where soldier is stationed, (fig.) place of duty; position taken by body of soldiers, force occupying this; fort; (also trading-p.) place occupied for purposes of trade esp. in uncivilized country; situation, employment; (Naval, hist.) commission as officer in command of vessel of 20 guns or more, p. captain, holder of such commission (not of courtesy title or inferior command); (Mil.) first, last, p., bugle-call giving notice of hour of retiring for night; (v.t.) place, station, (soldiers &c.), (Mil., Nav.) commission (person) as captain. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  96. in comb. = Letin post after, behind, in wds f. Letin; & as living English prefix, as: -classical, occurring later than the classical period of (esp. Greek& Roman) language, literature, or art; -communion, part of eucharistic office following act of communion; -costal, behind a rib; -date, (v.t.) affix, assign, a later than the actual date to (document, event, &c.), (n., post-) such date; -diluvian, a. & n., (person) existing, occurring, after the Flood; -entry, late or subsequent entry (for race, in book-keeping, &c.);. -exilian, -exilic, subsequent to the Babylonian exile; -fix, (v.t.) append (letters) at end of word, (n., post-) suffix; -glacial, subsequent to the glacial period; -graduate, (of course of study) carried on after graduation; -millennial, of the period following the millennium; -millennialism, doctrine that second Advent will follow the millennium, so -millennialist n.; -natal, occurring after birth; -nuptial, subsequent to marriage; -oral, situated behind the mouth; -pliocene, of the formation immediately overlying the pliocene; -tertiary, of the formations subsequent to the tertiary. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  97. post hoc ergo propter hoc, L phr. (after this, therefore on account of this) ridiculing the tendency to confuse mere sequence with cause& effect; post-impressionism,-ist, (exponent of) a bizarre experimental style of painting named as aspiring to supersede the impressionism prevalent from c. 1870. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  98. A large kind of writing-paper. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  99. n. [Latin] A piece of timber or other solid substance set upright, especially as a support ; a pillar ;-the place at which any thing is stayed or fixed ; a station ; especially, a military station ;-an office or position of service, trust or emolument ;-a messenger who goes from station to station ; a letter-carrier; an express; a postman ;-an established conveyance for letters ; the mail ;-a sort of writing paper. Cabinet Dictionary
  100. adv. With post - horses ; with great rapidity. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for post?

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