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Definitions of premise

  1. To state antecedent propositions. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To state in advance, as an explanation. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To send or state before the rest: to make an introduction: to lay down propositions for subsequent reasonings. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To state, or lay down, first. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To state in advance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To make an explanation beforehand. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To speak or write previously, or as introductory to the main subject; to lay down as propositions to reason from. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. To speak or write as introductory to the main subject; to explain or offer previously; to lay down as first propositions on which the subsequent ones are based. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. A distinct portion of land with its appurtenances. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. Either of the first two propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is drawn. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. Matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts; as, to lease premises; to trespass on another's premises. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. To set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows; especially, to lay down premises or first propositions, on which rest the subsequent reasonings. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. To make a premise; to set forth something as a premise. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. That which is premised: a proposition antecedently supposed or proved for after-reasoning: (logic) one of the two propositions in a syllogism from which the conclusion is drawn: the thing set forth in the beginning of a deed:-pl. a building and its adjuncts. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. A proposition laid down or proven, as a basis for argument. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. A preposition antecedently assumed or laid down. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. The two propositions of a syllogism, called respectively major and minor, from which the conclusion is deduced, subject-matter of a conveyance or deed as set forth in the beginning; a building and its adjuncts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

What are the misspellings for premise?

Usage examples for premise

  1. The ballooning exploits which, however, we have now to recount had quite another and more special object consistently in view- that of scientific investigation; and we would here premise that the proper appreciation of these investigations will depend on a due understanding of the attendant circumstances, as also of the constant characteristic behaviour of balloons, whether despatched for mere travel or research. – The Dominion of the Air by J. M. Bacon
  2. The real nerve of the thinking of a mind so vehement, so passionate, so essentially dramatic is to be sought not in some principle which was the major premise of his syllogisms, but in some pervading emotion. – Shelley, Godwin and Their Circle by H. N. Brailsford
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