Spellcheck.net

Definitions of preposition

  1. a function word that combines with a noun or pronoun or noun phrase to form a prepositional phrase that can have an adverbial or adjectival relation to some other word Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running. Newage Dictionary DB
  3. A word, followed by a noun or pronoun, as object, which shows the relation of the object to some other word; as, in the sentence. Mary went to the store, to is a preposition showing relation between store and went. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. A word placed before a noun or pronoun to show its relation to some other word of the sentence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. The part of speech that denotes the relation of an object to an action or thing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. A word usually put before a noun or a pronoun to show its relation to another word in the sentence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. In gram., one of a class of words which express the various relations subsisting between verbs, nouns, and pronouns, and are nearly always placed before the words they govern. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. PREPOSITIONALLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. PREPOSITIONAL. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

Usage examples for preposition

  1. As, however, this latter practice should not be indulged in too frequently, it may be of interest to many of your readers to consider some phases of our preposition of." – The Esperantist, Complete by Various
  2. Each form of the infinitive is found as the subject of a verb, as its object, as an attribute complement, and as the object of a preposition – Composition-Rhetoric by Stratton D. Brooks
X