Spellcheck.net

Definitions of principle

  1. rule of personal conduct Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an explanation of the fundamental reasons (especially an explanation of the working of some device in terms of laws of nature); "the rationale for capital punishment"; "the principles of internal-combustion engines" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct; "their principles of composition characterized all their works" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a rule or standard especially of good behavior; "a man of principle"; "he will not violate his principles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. (law) an explanation of the fundamental reasons (especially an explanation of the working of some device in terms of laws of nature); "the rationale for capital punishment"; "the principles of internal-combustion engines" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. Beginning; commencement. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. An original faculty or endowment. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. A fundamental truth; a comprehensive law or doctrine, from which others are derived, or on which others are founded; a general truth; an elementary proposition; a maxim; an axiom; a postulate. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. A settled rule of action; a governing law of conduct; an opinion or belief which exercises a directing influence on the life and behavior; a rule (usually, a right rule) of conduct consistently directing one's actions; as, a person of no principle. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. Any original inherent constituent which characterizes a substance, or gives it its essential properties, and which can usually be separated by analysis; -- applied especially to drugs, plant extracts, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet, or rule of conduct, good or ill. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. A source or cause; a settled rule or law of conduct; a truth which is general and fundamental; as, the principles of government; reason; uprightness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. 1. A continuously acting power or force. 2. The essential ingredient in a drug or chemical compound. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  17. Chief or important constituent. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  18. A fundamental truth: a law or doctrine from which others are derived: an original faculty of the mind: a settled rule of action: (chem.) a constituent part. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To establish in principles: to impress with a doctrine. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. Fundamental doctrine; rule of conduct; faculty of the mind; constituent part. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. A cause; essence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A general truth; rule of action, especially of right action. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. The source or origin of anything; clement; constituent or component part; an axiom or accepted truth; ground or reason; a general truth or law comprehending many subordinate one's; tenet or doctrine; a settled law or rule of action; action rightly motived. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To impress with any tenet; to establish firmly in the mind. See Prince. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. The cause, source, or origin of anything; an element; ground of action; motive; a constituent part; a fundamental truth; a law comprehending many subordinate truths; a settled law or rule of conduct or action; a tenet or doctrine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. To establish firmly in the mind. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. A primary concept, assumption, etc that is held to be true and fundamental for a particular field, procedure, knowledge. It is used to predict the course of related entities. thelawdictionary.org
  28. prin'si-pl, n. a fundamental truth on which others are founded or from which they spring: a law or doctrine from which others are derived: an original faculty of the mind: a settled rule of action: (chem.) a constituent part: (obs.) a beginning.--v.t. to establish in principles: to impress with a doctrine.--adj. PRIN'CIPLED, holding certain principles.--PRINCIPLE OF CONTRADICTION, the logical principle that a thing cannot both be and not be; PRINCIPLE OF EXCLUDED MIDDLE (logic), the principle that a thing must be either one thing or its contradictory; PRINCIPLE OF SUFFICIENT REASON (see REASON).--FIRST PRINCIPLE, a very general principle not deducible from others. [L. principium, beginning--princeps.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  29. Fundamental source, primary element, as held water to be the first p. of all things; fundamental truth as basis of reasoning &c., as (first) pp. of political economy; (Physics) general law (often with discoverer\'s name, as Pascal\'s p.); general law as guide to action, as moral, conservative, pp., a dangerous p., whence -principled a.; (pl. & collect. sing.) personal code of right conduct, as a man of high p., has ability but no pp., p. is everything; on p., from settled moral motive, as I refuse on p. (not from selfish motive &c.); law of nature seen in working of machine &c., as in all these instruments the p. is the same; (Chem.) constituent of a substance, esp. one giving rise to some quality &c., as bitter, colouring, p. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. A definite essential constituent. American pocket medical dictionary.
  31. A general truth; a general or widely prevailing law. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  32. An element or ultimate constituent, especially that one on which the distinctive characters of anything depend Appleton's medical dictionary.
  33. n. [Latin] A. source or origin ; that from which any thing proceeds;-an original faculty or endowment of the soul ;-a fundamental truth or tenet ; an elementary proposition ;-a settled rule of action;-usually, a right role of conduct ;- an original element which characterizes some substance, and from which it may be obtained by analysis. Cabinet Dictionary
X