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Definitions of privilege

  1. a right reserved exclusively by a particular person or group (especially a hereditary or official right); "suffrage was the prerogative of white adult males" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. bestow a privilege upon Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. grant a privilege to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a special advantage or immunity or benefit not enjoyed by all Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (law) the right to refuse to divulge information obtained in a confidential relationship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or immunity not enjoyed by others or by all; special enjoyment of a good, or exemption from an evil or burden; a prerogative; advantage; franchise. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. See Call, Put, Spread, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. To grant some particular right or exemption to; to invest with a peculiar right or immunity; to authorize; as, to privilege representatives from arrest. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. To bring or put into a condition of privilege or exemption from evil or danger; to exempt; to deliver. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. A special advantage, favor, or right, granted to or enjoyed by some to the exclusion of others; one of the rights granted to the people by a constitutional form of government. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To bestow some particular right or favor on; exempt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. A peculiar advantage: a right not general: prerogative. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To grant a privilege to: to exempt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. A peculiar advantage; special right. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To grant a privilege to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. A right or advantage enjoyed by certain persons only. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A benefit or advantage peculiar to a person, company or society; pecullar advantage, right or immunity; prerogative. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. To invest with a peculiar right or immunity; to exempt from censure. Writ of privilege, a writ to deliver a privileged person from custody when arrested in a civil suit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. A right enjoyed alone or with few; a peculiar benefit or advantage; liberty; favour; advantage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. To invest with rights or immunities; to grant some particular and peculiar benefit to; to exempt, as from censure, or from paying a tax or impost. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. A particular and peculiar benefit or advantage enjoyed by a person, company, or class, beyond the common advantages of other citizens. An exceptional or extraordinary power or exemption. A right, power, franchise, or immunity held by a person or class, against or beyond the course of the law. Privilege is an exemption from some burden or attendance, with which certain persons are indulged, from a supposition of law that the stations they fill, or the offices they are engaged in, are such as require all their time and care, and that, therefore, without this indulgence, it would be impracticable to execute such offices to that advantage which the public good requires. See Lawyers’ Tax Cases, 8 Heisk. (Tenn.) 049; U. S. v. Patrick (C. C.) 54 Fed. 348; Dike v. State, 38 Minn. 3GG, 38 N. W. 95; International Trust Co. v. American L. & T. Co., 62 Minn. 501, 65 N. W. 78; Com. v. Henderson, 172 Pa. 135, 33 Atl. 308; Tennessee v. Whitworth (C. C.) 22 Fed. 83; Morgan v. Louisiana, 93 U. S. 217, 23 L. 13d. 800; Corfield v. Coryell, 6 Fed. Cas. 551; State v. Giiman, 33 W. Va. 140, 10 S. E. 2S3, 6 L. R. A. 847. In the civil law. A right which the nature of a debt gives to a creditor, and which entitles him to be preferred before other creditors. Civil Code La. art. 3180. In maritime law. An allowance to the master of a ship of the same general nature with primage, being compensation, or rather a gratuity, customary iu certain trades, and which the law assumes to be a fair and equitable allowance, because the contract on both sides is made under the knowledge of such usage by the parties. 3 Chit. Commer. Law, 431. In the law of libel and slander. An exemption from liability for the speaking or publishing of defamatory words concerning another, based on the fact that the statement was made in the performance of a duty, political, judicial, social, or personal. Privilege is either absolute or conditional. The former protects the speaker or publisher without reference to his motives or the truth or falsity of the statement. This may be claimed in respect, for instance, to statements made in legislative debates, in reports of officers to their superiors in the line of their duty, and statements made by judges, witnesses, and jurors in trials in court. Conditional privilege will protect the speaker or publisher unless actual malice and knowledge of the falsity of the statement is shown. This may be claimed where the communication related to a matter of public interest, or where it was necessary to protect one’s private interest and was made to a person having an interest in the same matter. Ramsey v. Cheek, 109 N. C. 270, 13 S. E. 775; Nichols v. Eaton, 110 Iowa, 509, 81 N. W. 792, 47 L. It A. 483, 80 Am. St Rep. 319; Knapp & Co. v. Campbell, 14 Tex. Civ. App. 199, 30 S. W. 705; Hill v. Drainage Co., 79 Hun, 335, 29 N. Y. Supp. 427; Cooley v. Galyon, 109 Tenn. 1, 70 S. W. 007, 00 L. R. A. 139, 97 Am. St. Rep. 823 ; Rohs v. Backer, G Leisk. (Tenn.) 405, 19 Am. Rep. 598; Cranfill v. Haydu, 97 Tex. 544, 80 S. V. 013. In parliamentary law. The right of a particular question, motion, or statement to take precedence over all other business before the house and to be considered imme- diately, notwithstanding any consequent interference with or setting aside the rules of procedure adopted by the house. The matter may be one of “personal privilege,” where it concerns one member of the house in his capacity as a legislator, or of the “privilege of the house,” where it concerns the rights, immunities, or dignity of the entire body, or of “constitutional privilege,” where it relates to some action to be taken or some order of proceeding expressly enjoined by the constitution. thelawdictionary.org
  22. priv'i-lej, n. an advantage to an individual: a right enjoyed only by a few: freedom from burdens borne by others: prerogative: a sacred and vital civil right: (Shak.) superiority.--v.t. to grant a privilege to: to exempt: to authorise, license.--adj. PRIV'ILEGED.--BREACH OF PRIVILEGE, any interference with or slight done to the rights or privileges of a legislative body; QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE, any question arising out of the rights of an assembly or of its members; WRIT OF PRIVILEGE, an order for the release of a person from custody. [Fr.,--L. privilegium--privus, single, lex, legis, a law.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. Right, advantage, immunity, belonging to person, class, or office; special advantage or benefit, as to converse with him was a p.; p. (BENEFIT) of clergy; bill of p., petition of peer demanding to be tried by his peers; writ of p., writ to deliver privileged person from custody when arrested in civil suit; monopoly, patent, granted to individual, corporation, &c. p. cab (admitted to stand for hire in private place esp. railway station); (v.t.) invest with p., allow (person to do) as p., exempt (person from burden &c.). Hence privileged[French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. n. [Latin] A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favour ; a right or immunity not enjoyed by others or by all ; prerogative ; franchise ; liberty. Cabinet Dictionary

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