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Definitions of promise

  1. make a prediction about; tell in advance; "Call the outcome of an election" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make a promise or commitment Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. grounds for feeling hopeful about the future; "there is little or no promise that he will recover" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. give grounds for expectations; "The new results were promising"; "The results promised fame and glory" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a verbal commitment by one person to another agreeing to do (or not to do) something in the future Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. promise to undertake or give; "I promise you my best effort" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. In general, a declaration, written or verbal, made by one person to another, which binds the person who makes it to do, or to forbear to do, a specified act; a declaration which gives to the person to whom it is made a right to expect or to claim the performance or forbearance of a specified act. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. An engagement by one person to another, either in words or in writing, but properly not under seal, for the performance or nonperformance of some particular thing. The word promise is used to denote the mere engagement of a person, without regard to the consideration for it, or the corresponding duty of the party to whom it is made. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. That which causes hope, expectation, or assurance; especially, that which affords expectation of future distinction; as, a youth of great promise. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. Bestowal, fulfillment, or grant of what is promised. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. To engage to do, give, make, or to refrain from doing, giving, or making, or the like; to covenant; to engage; as, to promise a visit; to promise a cessation of hostilities; to promise the payment of money. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. To afford reason to expect; to cause hope or assurance of; as, the clouds promise rain. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. To make declaration of or give assurance of, as some benefit to be conferred; to pledge or engage to bestow; as, the proprietors promised large tracts of land; the city promised a reward. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. To give assurance by a promise, or binding declaration. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. To afford hopes or expectation; to give ground to expect good; rarely, to give reason to expect evil. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. An engagement to do or not to do something; the thing to be done or left undone; a cause or ground for hope or expectation. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To assure, or engage to do, something; give reason for hope or expectation. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To engage to do or not to do for another; give reason to hope for. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. Promiser, promisor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. An engagement to do or not to do something: expectation or that which affords expectation. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To make an engagement to do or not to do something: to afford reason to expect: to assure: to engage to bestow. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A declaration binding the one who makes it; engagement; ground of expectation. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To engage by declaration; give reason to expect. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To agree to do or not to do. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To afford hope or expectation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A declaration binding to do or not to do a specified act. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Reasonable ground for hope or expectation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Something promised. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. An engagement to do or not to do something for another's benefit; that which affords ground of expectation; that which is promised. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To engage to do something; to afford reason to expect. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To assure by promise; to afford expectations; to assure. Breach of promise, non-fulfilment of a matrimonial contract, which renders the party liable to damages at law. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. Word pledged; a declaration or engagement, more or less formal, to another; hopes; expectation. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To assure by a binding declaration; to engage or undertake to do, or not to do; to afford hopes or expectation. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. A declaration, verbal or written, made by one person to another for a good or valuable consideration in the nature of a covenant by which the promisor binds himself to do or forbear some act, and gives to the promisee a legal right to demand and enforce a fulfillment. See Taylor v. Miller, 113 N. C. 340, 18 S. E. 504; New- comb v. Clark, 1 Denio (N. Y.) 22S; Foute v. Bacon, 2 Cush. (Miss.) 104; U. S. v. Baltic Mills Co., 124 Fed. 41, 59 C. C. A. 558. “Promise” is to be distinguished, on the one hand, from a mere declaration of intention involving no engagement or assurance as to the future; and, on the other, from “agreement,” which is an obligation arising upon reciprocal promises, or upon a promise founded on a consideration. Abbott. “Fictitious promises,” sometimes called “implied promises,” or “promises implied in law,” occur in the case of those contracts which were invented to enable persons in certain cases to take advantage of the old rules of pleading peculiar to contracts, and which are not now of practical importance. Sweet thelawdictionary.org
  35. prom'is, n. an engagement made by a person either verbally or in writing to do or keep from doing something: expectation or that which causes expectation: a ground for hope of future excellence: (rare) fulfilment of what is promised.--v.t. to make an engagement to do or not to do something: to afford reason to expect: to assure: to engage to bestow.--v.i. to assure one by a promise: to afford hopes or expectations: (rare) to stand sponsor.--ns. PROM'ISE-BREACH (Shak.), violation of promise; PROM'ISE-BREAK'ER (Shak.), a violator of promises.--adj. PROM'ISE-CRAMMED (Shak.), crammed or filled with promises.--ns. PROMIS[=EE]', the person to whom a promise is made; PROM'ISER, PROM'ISOR.--adj. PROM'ISING, affording ground for hope or expectation: likely to turn out well.--advs. PROM'ISINGLY; PROM'ISSORILY.--adj. PROM'ISSORY, containing a promise of some engagement to be fulfilled.--n. PROM'ISSORY-NOTE, a note by one person promising to pay a sum of money to another, or to bearer, at a certain date, or at sight, or on demand.--PROMISED LAND, the land promised by God to Abraham and his seed: Canaan: heaven.--BE PROMISED (rare), to have an engagement; BREACH OF PROMISE (see BREACH); CONDITIONAL PROMISE, a promise of which the obligation depends on certain conditions--opp. to Absolute promise; EXPRESS PROMISE, a promise expressed orally or in writing; THE PROMISE, the assurance of God to Abraham that his descendants should become the chosen people. [Fr. promesse--L. promissa, promitt[)e]re, to send forward--pro, forward, mitt[)e]re, to send.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Assurance given to a person that one will do or not do something or will give or procure him something; thing promised, as I claim your p.; BREACH of p.; land of p. (see foll.); (fig.) ground of expectation of future achievements or good results, as book, writer, of great p. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. Make (person) a promise to give or procure him (thing), as I p. you a fair hearing; make (person) a promise (to do, that thing shall be done &c.); (abs.) cannot positively p.; p. oneself, look forward to (a pleasant time &c.); (colloq.) I p. (assure) you, it will not be so easy; (fig.) afford expectation of, as these discussions p. future storms, seem likely (to do); (abs.) p. well &c., hold out good &c. prospect; promised land (also land of promise) Canaan (Gen. xii. 7 &c.), heaven, any place of expected felicity. Hence promiser n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. n. A voluntary undertaking or engagement ; especially, an engagement to do or give something for the benefit of another-binding only in honour, conscience, and social obligations;-in law, a declaration, verbal or written, by which one person for some consideration or on some condition, binds and engages himself or his representatives to do or forbear a specified act-performance of which is enforceable by legal process ;-also, that which affords expectation; ground of hope ; prospective likelihood of future good, distinction, &c. ; - grant or gift promised ; fulfilment of what was promised or expected. Cabinet Dictionary

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