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Definitions of proof

  1. make or take a proof of, such as a photographic negative, an etching, or typeset Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the act of validating; finding or testing the truth of something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a trial photographic print from a negative Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. (printing) a trial impression made to check for errors Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (logic or mathematics) a formal series of statements showing that if one thing is true something else necessarily follows from it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a measure of alcoholic strength expressed as an integer twice the percentage of alcohol present (by volume) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. make resistant, as to water, sound, errors, etc. Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. activate by mixing with water and sometimes sugar or milk; "proof yeast" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (used in combination or as a suffix) able to withstand; "temptation-proof"; "childproof locks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. any factual evidence that helps to establish the truth of something; "if you have any proof for what you say, now is the time to produce it" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. (printing) an impression made to check for errors Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. a formal series of statements showing that if one thing is true something else necessarily follows from it Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. make resistant to water, sound, errors, etc.; "proof the materials against shrinking in the dryer" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. read for errors; "I should proofread my manuscripts" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. knead to reach proper lightness; "proof dough" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. Any effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. That degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments that induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness that resists impression, or does not yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. A trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination; -- called also proof sheet. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Cf. Prove, v. t., 5. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. Armor of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armor of proof. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. Used in proving or testing; as, a proof load, or proof charge. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. Firm or successful in resisting; as, proof against harm; waterproof; bombproof. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. Being of a certain standard as to strength; -- said of alcoholic liquors. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. The means by which something is found to be true or correct; convincing evidence; a test or trial; in printing, an impression taken from type for correction; an early impression of an engraving. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Capable of resisting; capable of moral or physical resistance: proof reader, one who is trained to find and correct errors in printers' proofs. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. That which proves: test: experiment: any process to discover or establish a truth: that which convinces: demonstration: evidence: condition of having been proved: firmness of mind: a certain strength of alcoholic spirits: (print.) an impression taken for correction, also "proof-sheet": an early impression of an engraving. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Proved: firm in resisting. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Able to withstand. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. Test; evidence; demonstration; impression of types, &c., taken for correction. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. Employed in or connected with proving or correcting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Firm; impenetrable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Of standard alcoholic strength. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. The act of proving; convincing evidence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. The standard strength of alcoholic liquors. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A printed trial-sheet, as for correction. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Strong to resist impression or penetration. See Prove. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. Trial or test; experiment; demonstration; that which convinces; hardness or firmness to resist; impenetrability; firmness of mind; the degree of strength in spirit; a rough impression taken for correction; an early impression of an engraving. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Evidence; testimony; test; trial; any effort, process, or operation to ascertain truth; that which convinces the mind and produces belief; capacity of resistance, as fire-proof, water-proof; firmness or stability of mind; a standard strength of spirit, containing nearly equal weights of pure alcohol and water; an impression taken from a form of type, or from an engraved plate, for examination and correction. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. Able to resist something; impenetrable. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. Proof, in civil process, is a sufficient reason for the truth of a juridical proposition by which a party seeks either to maintain his own claim or to defeat the claim of another. Whart. Ev. thelawdictionary.org
  43. pr[=oo]f, n. that which proves or establishes the truth of anything: test: (obs.) experience: experiment: any process to discover or establish a truth: that which convinces: demonstration: evidence which convinces the mind: state of having been proved: (pl.) in equity practice, the instruments of evidence in their documentary form: (Scots law) the taking of evidence by a judge upon an issue framed in pleading: a test, hence 'Armour of proof,' armour proved to be trustworthy: (arith.) an operation checking the accuracy of a calculation: firmness of mind: a certain strength of alcoholic spirits: (print.) an impression taken for correction, also 'proof-sheet:' an early impression of an engraving--'proof before letter'=one taken before the title is engraved on the plate: (phot.) the first print from a negative.--adj. firm in resisting: noting alcoholic liquors having the specific gravity 0.920:--pl. PROOFS.--ns. PROOF'-ARM'OUR, armour proved to be able to resist ordinary weapons; PROOF'-CHARGE, an extraordinary amount of powder and shot put into a gun to test its strength; PROOF'-HOUSE, a house fitted up for proving the barrels of firearms; PROOF'-LEAF (same as PROOF-SHEET).--adj. PROOF'LESS, wanting proof or evidence.--ns. PROOF'-MARK, a mark stamped on a gun to show that it has stood the test; PROOF'-READ'ER, a person who reads printed proofs to discover and correct errors; PROOF'-SHEET, an impression taken on a slip of paper for correction before printing finally; PROOF'-SPIR'IT, a mixture containing fixed proportions of alcohol and water--nearly half its weight and fully half its volume of alcohol; PROOF'-TEXT, a passage of Scripture held to prove a certain doctrine.--ARTIST'S PROOF, a first impression from an engraved plate or block; BURDEN OF PROOF (see BURDEN); INDIA PROOF (see INDIAN). [O. Fr. prove (Fr. preuve)--L. prob[=a]re, to prove.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. Evidence sufficing or helping to establish a fact, as this requires no p., as a p. of his esteem, p. positive of his intention or that he intended, whence proofless a.; spoken or written legal evidence; proving, demonstration, as not capable of p., in p. of my assertion; (Scotch law) trial before judge instead of by jury; test, trial, as must be brought to the p., will stand a severe p., the p. of t.e pudding is in the eating; (place for) testing of firearms or explosives; (archaic) proved impenetrability, as armour of p.; standard of strength of distilled alcoholic liquors; (first) p., trial impression taken from type, in which corrections &c. may be made (cf. revise), p.-reader, reading, (person employed in) reading& correcting pp., p.-sheet. sheet of p.; each of a limited number of careful impressions made from engraved plate before printing of ordinary issue& usu. (also p. before letters) before inscription is added, artist\'s, engraver\'s, p. (taken for examination oralteration by him), signed p., early p. signed by artist; test-tube; rough edges left to some leaves of book to show it has not been cut down; p.-plane, conductor fixed on insulating handle& used in measuring electrification of a body. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. (Of armour) of tried strength; impenetrable, as p. against the severest weather, the pricks of conscience, esp. in comb., as bomb, bullet, fire, rain, sound, burgar, thief, weather, -p., water p.; (v.t.) make (thing p., esp. make (fabric &c.) waterproof. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. n. [French, Latin] A test ; trial ; experiment ; any process or operation to determine the nature or qualities of physical bodies, or to test their strength or fitness for specific use ;-in mathematics, experimental trial to ascertain the correctness of products or results ;- also, demonstration of a problem, theorem, &c. ;-the amount or kind of evidence which convinces the mind and produces belief, as eye-witness, testimony, conclusive argument, &c. ;-firmness of mind ; constancy ; stability ;-that which has been assayed or tested, as armour, &c. ;-state of being wrought and hardened as to resist outward force or impression ; impenetrability, as by shot or shell ;-act of testing the strength of alcoholic spirits ; also, the degree of strength ;-a trial impression from type, an engraved plate, &c., taken for correction ; evidence ; reason ; argument. Cabinet Dictionary

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