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Definitions of protrude

  1. To shoot forward. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To push or thrust out; project outward. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To thrust or push forwards: to drive along: to put out. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To shoot forward; to project. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To be thrust forward or beyond the usual limit. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To be thrust out or forward. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. extend out or project in space; "His sharp nose jutted out"; "A single rock stick out from the cliff" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. extend out or project in space; "His sharp nose jutted out"; "A single rock sticks out from the cliff" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. To thrust out, as through a narrow orifice or from confinement; to cause to come forth. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. To shoot out or forth; to be thrust forward; to extend beyond a limit; to project. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. To thrust forward; to thrust out. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. To thrust forward; to thrust or put out; to thrust forward beyond the usual limits. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. Protrusion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. Protrusive. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for protrude?

Usage examples for protrude

  1. Abroad, we lose our self- respect; Wear whiskers; let our teeth protrude Consider any garb correct, And no display of temper rude; Descending, when we cross the foam, To depths we dare not plumb at home. – Verse and Worse by Harry Graham
  2. A little mound that rises beside the creek has been partially washed away by the water, leaving a crumbling bank, which shows the strata of the earth, a very thin layer of vegetable soil, beneath a stratum of grayish earth, and a layer of gravel, from which protrude a fossil bone or two. – The Extermination of the American Bison by William T. Hornaday
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