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Definitions of pull

  1. perform an act, usually with a negative connotation; "perpetrate a crime"; "pull a bank robbery" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. strip of feathers; "pull a chicken"; "pluck the capon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke); "he took a puff on his pipe"; "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. draw or pull out, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense; "pull weeds"; "extract a bad tooth"; "take out a splinter"; "extract information from the telegram" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. cause to move along the ground by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover; "draw a weapon"; "pull out a gun"; "The mugger pulled a knife on his victim" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. strain abnormally; "I pulled a muscle in my leg when I jumped up"; "The athlete pulled a tendon in the competition" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you; "the pull up the hill had him breathing harder"; "his strenuous pulling strained his back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a sustained effort; "it was a long pull but we made it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a device used for pulling something; "he grabbed the pull and opened the drawer" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. special advantage or influence; "the chairman's nephew has a lot of pull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the force used in pulling; "the pull of the moon"; "the pull of the current" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments; "the wrench to his knee occurred as he fell"; "he was sidelined with a hamstring pull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. take sides with; align oneself with; show strong sympathy for; "We all rooted for the home team"; "I'm pulling for the underdog"; "Are you siding with the defender of the title?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. tear or be torn violently; "The curtain ripped from top to bottom"; "pull the cooked chicken into strips" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. take away; "pull the old soup cans from the supermarket shelf" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. hit in the direction that the player is facing when carrying through the swing; "pull the ball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion; "Pull the rope"; "Pull the handle towards you"; "pull the string gently"; "pull the trigger of the gun"; "pull your kneees towards your chin" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. rein in to keep from winning a race; "pull a horse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. operate when rowing a boat; "pull the oars" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. steer into a certain direction; "pull one's horse to a stand"; "Pull the car over" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. move into a certain direction; "the car pulls to the right" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. cause to move in a certain direction by exerting a force upon, either physically or in an abstract sense; "A declining dollar pulled down the export figures for the last quarter" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To draw apart; to tear; to rend. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward one; to pluck; as, to pull fruit; to pull flax; to pull a finch. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To move or operate by the motion of drawing towards one; as, to pull a bell; to pull an oar. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To hold back, and so prevent from winning; as, the favorite was pulled. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To take or make, as a proof or impression; -- hand presses being worked by pulling a lever. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To exert one's self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. The act of pulling or drawing with force; an effort to move something by drawing toward one. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. A contest; a struggle; as, a wrestling pull. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. A pluck; loss or violence suffered. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. A knob, handle, or lever, etc., by which anything is pulled; as, a drawer pull; a bell pull. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. The act of rowing; as, a pull on the river. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. The act of drinking; as, to take a pull at the beer, or the mug. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. Something in one's favor in a comparison or a contest; an advantage; means of influencing; as, in weights the favorite had the pull. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. A kind of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the side. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. To draw towards one by exerting force; pluck; as, to pull grapes; drag or haul; as, to pull a wagon; draw out; as, to pull a tooth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. To draw forcibly; to tug. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. The act of using force to draw; a tug; colloquially, influence or advantage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To draw or try to draw: to draw forcibly: to tear: to pluck. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. To give a pull: to draw. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. The act of pulling: a struggle or contest. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. To draw; pluck. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. To draw with force; haul; drag; tug; pluck. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. The act of pulling; draft. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. An advantage, as through political favoritism. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. The act of pulling; that which is pulled; a contest; a struggle; a pluck; violence suffered. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. To draw towards one; to pluck; to tear; to rend. To pull down, to demolish; to humble. To pull off, to separate by pulling. To pull out, to extract. To pull up, to tear up by the roots; to eradicate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To give a pull; to tug. To pull through, to get through. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. To draw forcibly; to rend; to draw towards one; to pluck; to gather; to haul or tug. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. A pluck; a drawing; a contest. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. To strike the ball in a particular manner. See Pull, n., 8. mso.anu.edu.au
  56. 1. Internet. Data that is asked for by a recipient is pulled by them to their computer. Push is when they receive information that is sent to them. 2. Production. The generation of lists or material and parts that are ordered by a company. These are products ordered that is generated by sales to the public. 3. Marketing. The creation of a demand through advertising for a product. thelawdictionary.org
  57. p[=oo]l, v.t. to draw, or try to draw, with force: to draw or gather with the hand: to tear: to pluck: to extract: to move, propel by tugging, rowing, &c.: to transport by rowing: in horse-racing, to check a horse in order to prevent its winning: to produce on a printing-press worked by hand: to raid or seize.--v.i. to give a pull: to draw.--n. the act of pulling: a struggle or contest: exercise in rowing: (slang) influence, a favourable chance, advantage: (coll.) a drink, draught: (print.) a single impression of a hand-press.--ns. PULL'-BACK, a restraint: a device for making a woman's gown hang close and straight in front; PULL'ER.--PULL A FACE, to draw the countenance into a particular expression: to grimace; PULL APART, to bring asunder by pulling; PULL DOWN, to take down or apart: to demolish; PULL FOR, to row in the direction of; PULL OFF, to carry anything through successfully; PULL ONE'S SELF TOGETHER, to collect one's faculties; PULL OUT, to draw out, lengthen; PULL THE LONG BOW, to lie or boast beyond measure; PULL THROUGH, to get to the end of something difficult or dangerous with some success; PULL UP, to tighten the reins: to take to task: to bring to a stop: to halt; PULL UP STAKES, to prepare to leave a place. [A.S. pullian; conn. with Low Ger. pulen, to pluck.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. Exert upon (thing) force tending to draw it to oneself, as don\'t p. my hair, p. his ears or him by the ear (as chastisement), p. his nose or him by the nose (as insult), p. his sleeve or him by the sleeve (to gain attention). p. the (bell-rope or handle to ring the) bell, p. person\'s leg, p. (=draw) the long -bow, p. the strings, wires; draw (thing &c.) towards oneself or in direction so regarded, as p. it nearer, p. him into the room, p. your cap over your ears, p. off one\'s hat (as salutation), p. on one\'s stockings; p. (thing) to pieces, separate its parts forcibly, (fig.) criticize (person, thing) unfavourably; exert pulling force, as horse pulls well, pulled (away) at the handle; proceed with effort (up hill &c.); (of horse) strain, esp. habitually, against bit; p. devil, p. baker; draw, suck, at (pipe, cigar, &c.); pluck (plant, often up) by root; pulled, reduced in health or spirits; pulled bread, pieces from inside of new loaf, rebaked till crisp; p. caps, wigs, scuffle, quarrel; tear, pluck, at (thing); print upon (sheet), print (copy, proof), orig. in old hand-press by pulling bar towards one; move boat, move (boat), by pulling oar, (of boat) be rowed, be rowed by (so many oars), as she pulled in shore, pulls 6 oars; p. (row with effect in proportion to) one\'s weight; (slang) arrest; (slang) make raid on (gambling-house &c.); check (horse) esp. so as to make him lose race; (Crick.) strike (ball or abs.), strike ball bowled by (bowler), from off to leg; (Golf) drive (ball or abs.) widely to left; p. a face; p. a sanctimonious &c. face, assume such expression; p. about, p. from side to side, treat roughly; p. down, demolish (building &c.), lower in health, spirits, price, &c.; p. off, win (prize, contest); p. out, row out, (of train) move out of station; pull through adv. & prep., get (person), get oneself, safely through (danger, illness, &c. or abs.); p. oneself together, rally, recover oneself; p. together, work in harmony; p. up, cause (person, horse, vehicle) to stop, reprimand, check oneself, advance one\'s relative position in race &c.; p.-back, retarding influence, check, contrivance for pulling fullness of woman\'s skirt to back. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. Act of pulling, wrench, tug; force thus exerted; (Print.) rough proof; pulling at bridle to check horse esp. in racing; spell of rowing; (Crick., Golf) pulling stroke; (in public house) supply of beer &c. exceeding that asked for; have the p. (advantage) of (person); deep draught of liquor; handle &c. by which p. is applied, as BEER, BELL, -p. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. n. Act of pulling or drawing with force ; -a contest ; a struggle;-effort : strain ;-colloquially, hold over another ; upperhand in a difference, &c. Cabinet Dictionary

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