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Definitions of punish

  1. impose a penalty on; inflict punishment on; "The students were penalized for showing up late for class"; "we had to punish the dog for soiling the floor again" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. To impose a penalty upon; to afflict with pain, loss, or suffering for a crime or fault, either with or without a view to the offender's amendment; to cause to suffer in retribution; to chasten; as, to punish traitors with death; a father punishes his child for willful disobedience. Newage Dictionary DB
  3. To inflict a penalty for (an offense) upon the offender; to repay, as a fault, crime, etc., with pain or loss; as, to punish murder or treason with death. Newage Dictionary DB
  4. To injure, as by beating; to pommel. Newage Dictionary DB
  5. To deal with roughly or harshly; - chiefly used with regard to a contest; as, our troops punished the enemy. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To cause loss or pain to as a penalty for a crime or fault; correct; colloquially, to handle roughly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. Punisher. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. Punishable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. To exact a penalty: to cause loss or pain for a fault or crime: to chasten. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To exact a penalty from; inflict pain or loss for ill-doing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. To inflict a penalty upon; requite with penalty; chastise; castigate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. To afilict with pain, loss, of calamity for a crime or fault; to chastise; to chasten; to inflict a penalty. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. To afflict with pain, suffering, loss, or any calamity, as a penalty for a fault or crime, or with a view to amendment; to correct; to chasten. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. pun'ish, v.t. to cause to pay a penalty: to cause loss or pain to a person for a fault or crime: (coll.) to handle or beat severely, maul: (coll.) to consume a large quantity of: to chasten.--ns. PUNISHABIL'ITY, PUN'ISHABLENESS.--adj. PUN'ISHABLE, that may be punished--said both of persons and crimes.--ns. PUN'ISHER; PUN'ISHMENT, act or process of punishing: loss or pain inflicted for a crime or fault: the consequences of a broken law.--adjs. PUNITIVE (p[=u]'ni-tiv), pertaining to punishment: inflicting punishment; P[=U]'NITORY, punishing: tending to punishment. [Fr. punir, punis-sant--L. pun[=i]re, to punish--poena, penalty.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  15. Cause (offender) to suffer for offence; chastise; inflict penalty on (offender); inflict penalty for (offence); (colloq.) inflict severe blows on (opponent in boxing), (of race, competitor) tax severely the powers of (competitor), take full advantage of (weak bowling, bowler, stroke at tennis), make heavy inroad on (food &c.), whence punishing a. Hence punishability, punisher, punishment, nn., punishable a., punishably adv. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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