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Definitions of purse

  1. a bag used for carrying money and small personal items or accessories (especially by women); "she reached into her bag and found a comb" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. gather or contract into wrinkles or folds; pucker; "purse ones's lips" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a small bag for carrying money The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. a sum of money offered as a prize; "the purse barely covered the winner's expenses" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a sum of money spoken of as the contents of a money purse; "he made the contribution out of his own purse"; "he and his wife shared a common purse" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. contract one's lips into a rounded shape Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. A small bag or pouch, the opening of which is made to draw together closely, used to carry money in; by extension, any receptacle for money carried on the person; a wallet; a pocketbook; a portemonnaie. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. Hence, a treasury; finances; as, the public purse. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. A sum of money offered as a prize, or collected as a present; as, to win the purse; to make up a purse. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. A specific sum of money Newage Dictionary DB
  11. In Turkey, the sum of 500 piasters. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. In Persia, the sum of 50 tomans. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. To put into a purse. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a purse; to pucker; to knit. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. To steal purses; to rob. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. A small bag or pouch for money; a sum of money collected for a purpose; as, they made up a purse for the widow; treasury; as, the public purse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To pucker or wrinkle; as, to purse the lips. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. A small bag for money, orig. made of skin: a sum of money: a treasury. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To put into a purse: to contract as the mouth of a purse: to contract into folds. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. A small bag for money; treasury. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To put in a purse; to draw into wrinkles. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To draw into wrinkles. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. To place in a purse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A treasury. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Money offered as a prize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A small bag for money, and carried in the pocket; a sum of money; in Turkey, a sum of 500 piasters; the treasury. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To put in a purse; to contract into folds or wrinkles. Long purse, wealth. Light purse, poverty. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. A small money bag or case; a sum of money given as a prize or present; in Turkey, the sum of 500 piastres. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. To contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a purse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. a bag for money. The Hebrews, when on a journey, were provided with a bag, in which they carried their money, ( Genesis 42:35 ; Proverbs 1:14 ; 7:20 ; Isaiah 46:6 ) and, if they were merchants, also their weights. ( 25:13 ; Micah 6:11 ) This bag is described in the New Testament by the terms balantion (bag) ( Luke 10:4 ; 12:33 ; Luke 22:35 Luke 22:38 ) and glossokomon (originally the bag in which musicians carried the mouth-pieces of their Instruments). ( John 12:6 ; 13:29 ) The girdle also served as a purse. ( Matthew 10:9 ; Mark 6:8 ) Ladies wore ornamental purses. ( Isaiah 3:24 ) [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  31. A purse, prize, or premium is .ordinarily some valuable thing, offered by a person for the doing of something by others, into strife for which he does not enter. lie has not a chance of gaining the thing offered ; and, if he abide by his offer, that he must lose it and give it over to some of those con- 'tending for it is reasonably certain. Harris v. White, 81 N. Y. 539. thelawdictionary.org
  32. Gr. balantion, a bag ( Luke 10:4 ; Luke 22:35 Luke 22:36 ). biblestudytools.com
  33. Gr. zone, properly a girdle ( Matthew 10:9 ; Mark 6:8 ), a money-belt. As to our Lord's sending forth his disciples without money in their purses, the remark has been made that in this "there was no departure from the simple manners of the country. At this day the farmer sets out on excursions quite as extensive without a para in his purse; and a modern Moslem prophet of Tarshisha thus sends forth his apostles over this identical region. No traveller in the East would hestitate to throw himself on the hospitality of any village." Thomson's Land and the Book. (See SCRIP .) These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Purse". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  34. purs, n. a small bag for money, orig. made of skin: a sum of money, esp. a sum given as a present or offered as a prize: a treasury: a person's finances.--v.t. to put into a purse: to contract as the mouth of a purse: to draw into folds or wrinkles.--n. PURSE'-BEAR'ER, one who has charge of the purse of another: a treasurer.--adj. PURSE'-BEAR'ING, pouched, marsupiate.--ns. PURSE'FUL, as much as a purse can hold: enough to fill a purse; PURSE'-MOUTH (Tenn.), a pursed-up mouth; PURSE'-NET, a kind of net that can be closed like a purse; PURSE'-PRIDE.--adj. PURSE'-PROUD, proud of one's purse or wealth: insolent from wealth.--ns. PURS'ER, an officer who has charge of the provisions, clothing, and accounts of a ship, now termed a 'paymaster;' PURS'ERSHIP; PURSE'-SEINE, a seine which can be pursed into the shape of a bag.--n.pl. PURSE'-STRINGS, the strings fastening a purse.--n. PURSE'-TAK'ING, robbing.--A LIGHT, or EMPTY, PURSE, poverty; A LONG, or HEAVY, PURSE, riches; PRIVY PURSE, an allowance for the private expenses of the British sovereign: an officer in the royal household who pays the sovereign the grant of the civil list for his private expenses. [O. Fr. borse (Fr. bourse)--Low L. bursa--Gr. byrsa, a hide.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. Scrotum- p. Shepherd's, Thlaspi bursa. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  36. Small pouch of leather &c. for carrying money on the person, orig. closed by drawing strings together; (fig.) money, funds, as a common p. (fund), heavy or long p., wealth, light p., poverty, the public p., national treasury; privy p.; sum collected, subscribed, or given, as present or as prize for contest, as will any gentleman give or put up a p.?; (in Turk. empire) p. of silver, gold, 500 plastres, 10,000 piastres; bag-like natural or other receptacle. pouch, cyst, &c.; p.-bearer, one who has charge of another\'s or a company\'s money, official carrying Great Seal before Lord Chancellor in p.; p.-net, bag-shaped net for catching rabbits &c., mouth of which can be closed with cards; p.-proud, puffed up by wealth; p.-seine, p.-net for fishing; p.-strings, strings for closing mouth of p., hold the p.-s., have control of expenditure, tighten, loosen, the p.-s., be sparing, generous, of money. Hence purseful n., purseless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. Contract (lips, brow, often up) in wrinkles; become wrinkled; (rare) put (often up) into one\'s purse. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. n. [French, Latin, Greek] A kind of small bag used to carry money in ;-hence, a treasury sum of money offered as a prize, or collected as a present. Cabinet Dictionary

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