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Definitions of purse

  1. To pucker or wrinkle; as, to purse the lips. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. To put into a purse: to contract as the mouth of a purse: to contract into folds. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. To put in a purse; to draw into wrinkles. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4. To draw into wrinkles. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. To place in a purse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To put in a purse; to contract into folds or wrinkles. Long purse, wealth. Light purse, poverty. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a purse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. a small bag for carrying money The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. a sum of money offered as a prize; "the purse barely covered the winner's expenses" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a sum of money spoken of as the contents of a money purse; "he made the contribution out of his own purse"; "he and his wife shared a common purse" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. A small bag or pouch, the opening of which is made to draw together closely, used to carry money in; by extension, any receptacle for money carried on the person; a wallet; a pocketbook; a portemonnaie. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. Hence, a treasury; finances; as, the public purse. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. A sum of money offered as a prize, or collected as a present; as, to win the purse; to make up a purse. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. A specific sum of money Newage Dictionary DB
  15. In Turkey, the sum of 500 piasters. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. In Persia, the sum of 50 tomans. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. To put into a purse. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a purse; to pucker; to knit. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. To steal purses; to rob. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. A small bag or pouch for money; a sum of money collected for a purpose; as, they made up a purse for the widow; treasury; as, the public purse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. A small bag for money, orig. made of skin: a sum of money: a treasury. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A small bag for money; treasury. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. A treasury. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Money offered as a prize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A small bag for money, and carried in the pocket; a sum of money; in Turkey, a sum of 500 piasters; the treasury. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. A small money bag or case; a sum of money given as a prize or present; in Turkey, the sum of 500 piastres. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for purse

  1. In addition to that amount the managers of the fair and several gentlemen who do not care to have their names made public, have made up a purse of one hundred and eighty dollars to be divided equally between them. – The Adventures of a Country Boy at a Country Fair by James Otis
  2. Here is a purse of gold for thy wages, and here are three gifts to reward thy courage and good- will. – The Firelight Fairy Book by Henry Beston
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