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Definitions of rack

  1. To fly, as vapour or broken clouds. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To amble, as a horse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  3. To draw off from the lees or sediment, as wine. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To extend by the application of force; to stretch or strain; specifically, to stretch on the rack or wheel; to torture by an engine which strains the limbs and pulls the joints. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To torment; to torture; to affect with extreme pain or anguish. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To stretch or strain, in a figurative sense; hence, to harass, or oppress by extortion. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To wash on a rack, as metals or ore. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To bind together, as two ropes, with cross turns of yarn, marline, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To stretch or strain on an instrument of torture; torture; torment; as, racked by remorse; strain; tear; as, racked by a cough; tax greatly; as, to rack one's brain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To stretch forcibly: to strain: to stretch on the rack or wheel: to torture: to exhaust. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To strain or draw off from the lees, as wine. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To strain; torture; draw off, as liquor. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. To torture; pain; stretch; tear; strain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To draw off from the lees, as liquors. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To fly, as vapor or broken clouds. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To go at a pacing gait, as a horse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To move, as a horse, with the gait called rack. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. torment emotionally or mentally Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. torture on the rack Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. work on a rack, of materials such as leather Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. fly in high wind Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. run before a gale Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. To amble fast, causing a rocking or swaying motion of the body; to pace; - said of a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To stretch or strain on the rack or wheel; to torture; to harass by exaction; to stretch; to wrest; to extend. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To draw off from the less; to defecate or decant. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To decant or strain, as wines; to draw wines off the lees. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. To strain; to stretch; to torture by stretching; to affect with extreme pain or anguish. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. a support for displaying various articles; "the newspapers were arranged on a rack" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. framework for holding objects Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. rib section of a forequarter of veal or pork or especially lamb or mutton Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. work on a rack; "rack leather" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. stretch to the limits; "rack one's brains" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. go at a rack; "the horses single-footed" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. obtain by coercion or intimidation; "They extorted money from the executive by threatening to reveal his past to the company boss"; "They squeezed money from the owner of the business by threatening him" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. put on a rack and pinion; "rack a camera" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. Same as Arrack. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A fast amble. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A distaff. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. The neck and spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. A wreck; destruction. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Thin, flying, broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapor in the sky. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. An instrument for torturing the body by stretching or straining the limbs; formerly used to force a confession; intense physical or mental suffering; a framework on or in which articles are hung or arranged; a straight bar having teeth which work with the teeth of a pinion or cogwheel; thin, broken, vapory clouds; wreck; used only in rack and ruin; a pacing gait of a horse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. An instrument for racking or extending: an engine for stretching the body in order to extort a confession: a framework on which articles are arranged: the grating above a manger for hay: (mech.) a straight bar with teeth to work with those of a wheel: (fig.) extreme pain, anxiety, or doubt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. Thin or broken clouds, drifting across the sky. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. An engine of torture; frame work on which things are laid; grating to hold hay; toothed bar; flying clouds. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. A machine for stretching or straining; an instrument of torture by which the limbs were stretched or strained. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. An open grating or frame work. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A bar having teeth that engage with those of a gear - wheel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A quadruped's motion resembling the pace, two feet on a side being moved at once. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. Thin, flying clouds; any floating vapor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. Same as WRACK; obsolete except in the pharse "to go to rack and ruin.". The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. An instrument for stretching or extending anything; an engine of torture; torture; a frame in which articles are arranged; a grate on which bacon is laid; a wooden frame for the feeding of horses, &c.; the frame of the bones of an animal; a straight bar, with teeth to fit into those of a wheel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. Any portion of floating vapour in the sky. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. Among the Tartars, a spirituous liquor made of mare's milk. See Arrack. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. A racking-pace. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. Wreck, which see. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. An instrument for stretching; an engine of torture; extreme pain; anguish. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. The neck or spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. A receptacle for hay for feeding horses, &c., formed of a range of upright bars; a frame on which articles may be placed or spread out, as a plate-rack; the frame from which the yarn or thread is drawn in spinning; in mining, an inclined plane on which the ore is washed and separated from the slime or earth; a flat bar with teeth on one side to work into those of a pinion. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. The drift of the sky; thin, flying, broken clouds-not to be confounded with reek, a mist or vapour. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. An instrument or frame used for stretching, extending, retaining, or displaying, something. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. An instrument for bending a bow. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. A grate on which bacon is laid. Webster Dictionary DB
  64. A frame or device of various construction for holding, and preventing the waste of, hay, grain, etc., supplied to beasts. Webster Dictionary DB
  65. A frame on which articles are deposited for keeping or arranged for display; as, a clothes rack; a bottle rack, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  66. A frame or table on which ores are separated or washed. Webster Dictionary DB
  67. A frame fitted to a wagon for carrying hay, straw, or grain on the stalk, or other bulky loads. Webster Dictionary DB
  68. A bar with teeth on its face, or edge, to work with those of a wheel, pinion, or worm, which is to drive it or be driven by it. Webster Dictionary DB
  69. That which is extorted; exaction. Webster Dictionary DB
  70. An engine of torture, consisting of a large frame, upon which the body was gradually stretched until, sometimes, the joints were dislocated; - formerly used judicially for extorting confessions from criminals or suspected persons. Webster Dictionary DB
  71. A piece or frame of wood, having several sheaves, through which the running rigging passes; - called also rack block. Also, a frame to hold shot. Webster Dictionary DB

Usage examples for rack

  1. 4. The time- card rack – Advanced Toy Making for Schools by David M. Mitchell
  2. On the floor of the cabin, thrown by the shock from the rack lay her writing case. – Benita, An African Romance by H. Rider Haggard
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