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Definitions of radical

  1. (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed; "thematic vowels are part of the stem" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a person who has radical ideas or opinions Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. A primitive word; a radix, root, or simple, underived, uncompounded word; an etymon. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. A primitive letter; a letter that belongs to the radix. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A characteristic, essential, and fundamental constituent of any compound; hence, sometimes, an atom. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A radical quantity. See under Radical, a. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. One who advocates radical changes in government or social institutions, especially such changes as are intended to level class inequalities; - opposed to conservative. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A simple word, or root, from which other words are formed; a person who holds extreme views and takes extreme measures. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. Radicalness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. A root: a primitive word or letter: one who advocates radical reform: (chem.) the base of a compound. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. A root; primitive word; one who advocates a fundamental change in principles of government. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. An extremist. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. The primitive part of a word; a root; radicle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. A quantity of which the root is required. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. A primitive word; a radix, root, or simple underived uncompounded word; a letter that belongs to the root; one who advocatea radical reform, or extreme changes of a democratic character in the state; the base of a compound. See Radix. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. (linguistics) of or relating to or constituting a linguistic root; "a radical verb form" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. arising from or going to the root; "a radical flaw in the plan" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. especially of leaves; located at the base of a plant or stem; especially arising directly from the root or rootstock or a root-like stem; "basal placentation"; "radical leaves" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. Of or pertaining to the root; proceeding directly from the root. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Hence: Of or pertaining to the root or origin; reaching to the center, to the foundation, to the ultimate sources, to the principles, or the like; original; fundamental; thorough-going; unsparing; extreme; as, radical evils; radical reform; a radical party. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Belonging to, or proceeding from, the root of a plant; as, radical tubers or hairs. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Proceeding from a rootlike stem, or one which does not rise above the ground; as, the radical leaves of the dandelion and the sidesaddle flower. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Relating, or belonging, to the root, or ultimate source of derivation; as, a radical verbal form. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Of or pertaining to a radix or root; as, a radical quantity; a radical sign. See below. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Specifically, a group of two or more atoms, not completely saturated, which are so linked that their union implies certain properties, and are conveniently regarded as playing the part of a single atom; a residue; -- called also a compound radical. Cf. Residue. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A radical vessel. See under Radical, a. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Pertaining to the root or origin; original; extreme; as, a radical difference of opinion; in mathematics, showing or containing the root of a number; pertaining to a political party of advanced views. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Pertaining to the root, or origin: original: reaching to the principles: implanted by nature: not derived: serving to originate: (bot.) proceeding immediately from the root: (politics) ultra-liberal, democratic. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Original; rooted; implanted by nature; reaching to the principles; pertaining to radicals. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. Proceeding from or pertaining to the root; essential; fundamental. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Thoroughgoing; unsparing; extreme. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Pertaining to the root or origin; original; fundamental; implanted by nature; primitive; underived; proceeding immediately from the root. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. Pert. to or arising from the root; fundamental; implanted by nature; constitutional; original; not derived or compounded; primitive; in bot., proceeding from a point close to the summit or crown of the root, applied to leaves close to the ground clustered at the base of a flower-stalk; complete; thorough. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. Arising from the root close to the ground, as basal leaves. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

What are the misspellings for radical?

Usage examples for radical

  1. Such radical lines of treatment should be discouraged. – Common Diseases of Farm Animals by R. A. Craig, D. V. M.
  2. But the colonial secretary had obviously come to the opinion that it was necessary to make a radical change which would insure greater harmony between the executive and the popular bodies of the provinces. – Canada under British Rule 1760-1900 by John G. Bourinot
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